Culture

11 Words That Mean Something Different In Miami

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If you’ve spent any time in Miami, you know we Miamians tend to speak an entirely different language than the rest of the United States/known universe. Grab this cheat sheet. And your passport.


“Ventanita”

“Dale”

giphy / Yahooentertainment.tumblr.com / Yahoo Music
CREDIT: CREDIT: Giphy / Tumblr / Yahoo Music

What it usually means: Spanish for “go!,” or that word Pitbull uses in his songs.

What it means in Miami: Go. Come. Yes. Do it. We can do it. Bye, this meeting is over. “Aya tu.” Great job on those reports, Cheryl. Get it in. Let’s do it. It’s pachanga time.

In a sentence: “Dale, have the last croqueta. That’s how much I love you.”


“Swears”

giphy-40
Credit: The CW / Giphy

What it usually means: To make a vow. Or to use foul language.

What it means in Miami: When someone se cree el último Coca-Cola en el desierto.

In a sentence: “Bro, she swears, bro. Se cree tremendita, but none of the Caros even know her.”


“Super”

I need him to send me cafesito STAT!! #500cc'sofwakemyassup #supermeng #

A photo posted by Julieta O. Vallejos (@julezisluv) on

“Nooooo”

CREDIT: The Hills / MTV / thenug.com / giphy
CREDIT: CREDIT: The Hills / MTV / thenug.com / giphy

What it usually means: An exaggerated way to say “no.”

What it means in Miami: “Yaaaaas.”

In a sentence: “Nooooooo, I love it, of course I’ll marry you.”


“Ñoooo”

Introducing the ÑOOO it's a dessert that will leave you saying ÑOOO… Only at @breadmanmiamibakery #yummy #foodporn #hialeah #ñooo

A photo posted by ⓔⓐⓣ . ⓛⓞⓥⓔ . ⓑⓡⓔⓐⓓ (@breadmanmiamibakery) on

“Bottles”

Credit: Comedy Central / NBC / Giphy

What it usually means: A container for liquid.

What it means in Miami: How you inform your friends that it’s going down tonight. (Think various bottles filled with various types of brightly-colored alcohol.)

In a sentence: “Tonight’s gonna be bottles, bro. It’s going to be random, in a good way.”


“Bro”

CREDIT: fallontonight.tumblr.com / giphy
CREDIT: NBC / giphy

What it usually means: Short form of the word “brother.”

What it means in Miami: Everything. It can be used as both a nickname for anyone–stranger or friend, male or female. It can also be an exclamation. Some potential uses: “Friend”, “buddy”, “oh wow”, “no way”, “don’t even think about it”, “definitely”, “buddy”, “girlfriend”, “abuela”

In a sentence: “Bro! Calm down. She’s my bro, she didn’t mean it, bro. Don’t bro out on me, bro.”


“Egypt”

A “Mission”

Oh how I love wasting my life in traffic on 95. #seaofred #itsworseinperson #miamitraffic

A photo posted by Stephanie Cole (@stephcole4) on

“Papaya”

The artist must've been Cuban. #frutabomba #conqueso

A photo posted by Rosie Romero (@_rosier) on

A Dating Website For Uniformed People Claims A Married Cop Suing Them Isn’t As Innocent As He Claims

Culture

A Dating Website For Uniformed People Claims A Married Cop Suing Them Isn’t As Innocent As He Claims

If you’re in a relationship, hold on to them tight. If you’re not, good luck out there because the dating world is mad crazy. Trying to meet people, especially online (is there any other way?) it is rough. Millions of people are trying to find love via dating websites, which means the competition is steep. It’s also challenging to make people not swipe left, meaning, getting someone to be interested in you based on your picture alone is the ultimate goal. So what makes people interested in someone else? If you’re a woman attracted to men, it’s pretty much the same thing since the beginning of time: tall, dark, handsome, and a man in uniform. That brings us to this hilarious yet unfortunate story.

A Florida cop has filed a lawsuit against a dating website for using his picture for marketing purposes. Oh yeah, and he also happens to be married.

Credit: @wackymoe / Twitter

Before we go on, we know what you’re thinking: this cop lied to his wife, set up a dating profile online, and got caught, so now he’s suing the company, acting like he had nothing to do with it. 

However, companies of all sorts have been caught in the past for wrongfully using images without permission simply because they came across a random image online. Also, the man is hot! So, of course, these online dating websites would want to attract users by using the image of an attractive young police officer (in uniform) as a way to lure in people who are starving for love (or something else, wink wink). 

David Guzman alleges that he had no idea his image was being used as a marketing ploy for online dating websites until his friends came across his advertisement.

Credit: @Kaygirl8Lawana / Twitter

According to court documents, last year Guzman said his friends told him that they had seen his picture and informed him like ‘hey, dude isn’t this you?’ Another person who found out: his wife! Yikes!!

The South Florida Sun-Sentinel reports that his wife asked Guzman why his picture was on a dating website, and he responded to her by saying he “had no idea.” Okay, like that’s going to be enough for her to believe him. By the way, the advertisement that accompanied his picture said: “Bulletproof vest? Nah, it’s all muscle” Catchy and enticing! But yeah, he said he did not write that either. 

The 33-year-old police officer contacted the owner of the dating websites and demanded that they take down his picture from UniformDating.com.

Credit: @joshuarhett / twitter

NSI Holdings, owner of Cupid.com and UniformDating.com, didn’t take down the picture. First, they demanded that Guzman show identification, which he did promptly. Then NSI Holdings alleges that they found a dating profile that included his name, his age, and his birthdate and his email address.

Their argument is they have a right to use his picture because he apparently has a dating profile. They’re saying that either Guzman or someone close to him, started a profile and used his information. NSI Holdings also found that the person attached to that dating website did go on UniformDating.com and “that creation of the profile was a momentary dalliance.”  

Furthermore, people who use NSI Holdings dating website sign the terms and agreements which state that they can use your image and information as they please “to reproduce and broadcast the information contained in your profile including your name, photograph” and other submissions “for marketing and other purposes,” without compensating the user. Now that is some kind of bullshit. 

Guzman alleges that the company has still not taken down his picture, and he’s not rolling over and taking this kind of harassment.

Credit: @FCN2go / Twitter

It’s unclear what Guzman is asking for in his lawsuit, aside from the company taking down his picture, but we’re sure some monetary payback is in order.

“Defendant’s use of plaintiff’s image, likeness and/or identity in connection with a dating service impugns plaintiff’s character, embarrasses him, and suggests — falsely — that he, a married person, is presently dating and seeking out other partners,” the lawsuit states according to the New York Post

Legal docs go on to state, that Guzman is “a married man and respected member of his community who has been caught with a profile on an online dating website.” Or perhaps he just got caught with his pants down, so to speak. No! We remain Team Guzman. 

Who do you believe? Let us know in the comments.

READ: Check Out Some Of Yesika Salgado’s Best Clapbacks To Creepy Men Hitting On Her On Dating Apps

Eva Longoria And Michael Peña Are Here To School Us All On The Art Of Mexican Slang

Entertainment

Eva Longoria And Michael Peña Are Here To School Us All On The Art Of Mexican Slang

Eva Longoria and Michael Peña may be two of Hollywood’s biggest Mexican-American stars, but now they can add teaching to their long list of experience.

You’re probably thinking, neta? Yes, really! Okay, well, technically…

Longoria and Peña, who are starring in this summer’s live-action Dora the Explorer film as Dora’s mother and father respectively, Dora and the Lost City of Gold, sat down with Vanity Fair to teach us (and test their own knowledge) Mexican slang. Whether you’re Mexican or not, you’ve probably heard a few of these classic phrases floating around. For example, “no manches,” which Peña explains has a lot of different definitions depending on the context, but generally translates to “get out of here” or “shut up” when responding to something that’s surprising or you just can’t believe. But these two can definitely explain it better than I can.

The definition and use of terms such as chicano, pedo, chamba, naco, among a ton of others are also broken down by the Dora and the Lost City of Gold actors in this hilarious video.

Now, be honest, how many of these do you use on a daily basis? Or how many did you have no idea what they actually meant?

The 44-year-old Corpus Christi native and the 43-year-old Chicago-born Narcos: Mexico actor aren’t the first to be recruited by Vanity Fair to teach us Mexican slang. In 2017, while on a press run for her film How to Be a Latin Lover, Salma Hayek sat in the tutorial hot seat to challenge others in the art of Mexican slang. The 52-year-old actress, who was born in Mexico, listed a few of the same phrases as shared by Longoria and Peña, but also explained the meaning behind several expressions such as “no mames,” “hombres malos,” “eso que ni que,” “tienes feria,” and “me vale madres.”

I think it’s safe to say that Salma Hayek taught us a lot of important ones here, amirite?

With Peña and Longoria’s new film, it’s probably important to become acquainted with a few of these phrases—Dora is, after all, an iconic Latina character. And the latest live-action movie features a number of Mexican and Mexican-American actors (Peña, Longoria, Eugenio Derbez, Danny Trejo, Adriana Barraza Isela Vega), so who knows if some of these terms will make their way to this big screen debut.

Based on Nickelodeon’s highly popular educational pre-school series, Dora the ExplorerDora and the Lost City of Gold follows a teenaged Dora (played by Isabela Moner) as she heads off to high school—which just might be her biggest and most challenging adventure yet. The quirky fun film sends Dora off on a mission to track down her parents, who are in need of saving, and enlists the help of her friends, including her primo Diego (played by Jeff Wahlberg) and monkey Boots. Along the way, she comes across familiar faces, like Swiper the Fox (voiced by Benicio del Toro)—who remembers the catchphrase, swiper no swiping?—while also trying to solve the mystery behind a lost Incan civilization.

The character of Dora the Explorer has played such an important role for Latino and non-Latino children alike.

Ok, so perhaps not teaching them Mexican slang like our friends Eva Longoria, Michael Peña and Salma Hayek, but most definitely teaching them Spanish. That was the case for one of those behind this new live-action take on Dora.

“My daughter knows Spanish because of Dora,” Dora and the City of Gold director James Bobin told the Los Angeles Times. “When she was little, I remember saying to her once, ‘What’s your favorite animal?’ And she said, ‘Ardilla.’ And I went, ‘A deer?’ and got a picture from a book of a deer. And she goes, ‘No, no, no, no, ardilla’ and pointed out the window [because] ardilla in Spanish is squirrel.”

And like its cartoon counterpart, Dora and the City of Gold hopes to appeal to all audiences. “The beautiful thing of the story is that thematically, it’s pretty universal,” Eva Longora said in an interview with the Los Angeles Times. “I think everybody’s going to understand it and relate to it. You don’t have to be Latino, but it is a celebration of our culture within the movie. Our language is in it, people who [reflect] our community are in it, it’s organically Latino. It wasn’t like ‘Insert Latino here.’ ”

Dora and the Lost City of Gold is in theaters everywhere August 9.

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