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11 Words That Mean Something Different In Miami

If you’ve spent any time in Miami, you know we Miamians tend to speak an entirely different language than the rest of the United States/known universe. Grab this cheat sheet. And your passport.


“Ventanita”

This coffee is literally the ?! Follow me on Snapchat as I make one last 2015 stroll down #CalleOcho. #LastDayof2015 #CalleOcho #LittleHavana #Cafecito #MrMiamiSips

A photo posted by Marvin Tapia (@mrmiamimarvin) on

“Dale”

CREDIT: Giphy / Tumblr / Yahoo Music

What it usually means: Spanish for “go!,” or that word Pitbull uses in his songs.

What it means in Miami: Go. Come. Yes. Do it. We can do it. Bye, this meeting is over. “Aya tu.” Great job on those reports, Cheryl. Get it in. Let’s do it. It’s pachanga time.

In a sentence: “Dale, have the last croqueta. That’s how much I love you.”


“Swears”

Credit: The CW / Giphy

What it usually means: To make a vow. Or to use foul language.

What it means in Miami: When someone se cree el último Coca-Cola en el desierto.

In a sentence: “Bro, she swears, bro. Se cree tremendita, but none of the Caros even know her.”


“Super”

I need him to send me cafesito STAT!! #500cc'sofwakemyassup #supermeng #

A photo posted by Julieta O. Vallejos (@julezisluv) on

“Nooooo”

CREDIT: The Hills / MTV / thenug.com / giphy

What it usually means: An exaggerated way to say “no.”

What it means in Miami: “Yaaaaas.”

In a sentence: “Nooooooo, I love it, of course I’ll marry you.”


“Ñoooo”

Introducing the ÑOOO it's a dessert that will leave you saying ÑOOO… Only at @breadmanmiamibakery #yummy #foodporn #hialeah #ñooo

A photo posted by ⓔⓐⓣ . ⓛⓞⓥⓔ . ⓑⓡⓔⓐⓓ (@breadmanmiamibakery) on

“Bottles”

Credit: Comedy Central / NBC / Giphy

What it usually means: A container for liquid.

What it means in Miami: How you inform your friends that it’s going down tonight. (Think various bottles filled with various types of brightly-colored alcohol.)

In a sentence: “Tonight’s gonna be bottles, bro. It’s going to be random, in a good way.”


“Bro”

CREDIT: NBC / giphy

What it usually means: Short form of the word “brother.”

What it means in Miami: Everything. It can be used as both a nickname for anyone–stranger or friend, male or female. It can also be an exclamation. Some potential uses: “Friend”, “buddy”, “oh wow”, “no way”, “don’t even think about it”, “definitely”, “buddy”, “girlfriend”, “abuela”

In a sentence: “Bro! Calm down. She’s my bro, she didn’t mean it, bro. Don’t bro out on me, bro.”


“Egypt”

A “Mission”

Oh how I love wasting my life in traffic on 95. #seaofred #itsworseinperson #miamitraffic

A photo posted by Stephanie Cole (@stephcole4) on

“Papaya”

The artist must've been Cuban. #frutabomba #conqueso

A photo posted by Rosie Romero (@_rosier) on

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A Florida Doctor Is Being Charged with a Hate Crime After Assaulting a Latino Man at a Supermarket

Things That Matter

A Florida Doctor Is Being Charged with a Hate Crime After Assaulting a Latino Man at a Supermarket

Photos via MIAMI-DADE CORRECTIONS, Getty Images

It’s an unfortunate reality that Latinos face immense amounts of racism in America. Case in point: a Florida doctor is facing hate crime charges after assaulting a Latino man at a supermarket.

According to police, a 58-year-old woman followed a Latino man out to the parking lot, keyed his car, smashed his phone, and punched him–all the while hurling racially-charged insults at him.

The altercation happened on Jan. 20th at a Publix supermarket in Hialeah, Florida–a town with a large Latino population. It all started when the victim, an unnamed Latino man, asked Dr. Jennifer Susan Wright to maintain social distancing in Spanish. After she ignored him, the man repeated the question in English.

It was at this point that Dr. Wright, who is an anesthesiologist at Mount Sinai Medical Center, became incensed and began muttering curse words under her breath. After the man left the grocery store, Dr. Wright followed him out to the parking lot.

She began to verbally berate him, calling him a “spic” and telling him “we should have gotten rid of you when we could.”

According to the police report, she also said: “This is not going to be Biden’s America, this is my America.” The woman then took her keys out an began to “stab the victim’s vehicle with her keys” while telling him to “go back to his country”.

The man took out his phone to call 911 and the woman allegedly punched him, causing him to drop his phone. When he bent over to pick his phone up, she allegedly kicked him and tried to stomp on his phone.

The woman fled before the police came, but she was arrested on Feb 12th at her home in Miami Springs.

The woman was initially charged with tampering with a victim, criminal mischief and battery with prejudice. The “hate crime” charge was later added, elevating the crime to a felony.

According to reports, Wright posted her $1000 bail and is now awaiting trial. Mount Sinai Medical Center released a statement saying that Dr. Wright is “no longer responsible for patient care” after assaulting a Latino man.

According to the Miami Herald, neighbors know Dr. Jennifer Wright as an ardent Trump supporter. Her social media pages are riddled with far-right, Pro-Trump memes and photos of her posing in a MAGA hat. She even uploaded a post that read: “It’s Okay To Be White.”

We can all agree that it’s “okay” to be white. It’s okay to be any race. We cannot, however, all agree that it’s okay to be a violent, racist bigot. We hope the victim has recovered and we hope Jennifer Wright will face justice.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

The Oxford Dictionary Is Finally Changing ‘Sexist’ Definitions Of The Word ‘Woman’

Fierce

The Oxford Dictionary Is Finally Changing ‘Sexist’ Definitions Of The Word ‘Woman’

Language has a tendency to be sexist.

Fortunately, Oxford University Press knows this and is making efforts to combat sexism and out of date language in its dictionaries. This year, their kicking off by tackling the word “woman.” According to Oxford University Press they’ve updated and changed the entry for “woman” in its dictionaries, including the Oxford English Dictionary, to promote equality and better describe women.

Oxford University Press explained in a recent statement that they’re expanding the dictionary’s coverage of women.

“We have expanded the dictionary coverage of ‘woman’ with more examples and idiomatic phrases which depict women in a positive and active manner,” the largest university press in the world explained in a statement. “We have ensured that offensive synonyms or senses are clearly labeled as such and only included where we have evidence of real-world usage.”

As part of their action, OUP added phrases such as “woman of the moment,” which had been absent from the dictionaries despite having the presence of ones like “man of the moment.”

According to CNN, “one of the definitions of ‘woman’ now refers to a ‘person’s wife, girlfriend, or female lover,’ as opposed to being tied to only a man. The definition for ‘man’ was updated to include gender-neutral terms and references to ‘sexual attractiveness or activity’ were revised for ‘man’ and ‘woman’ entries. OUP said its lexicographers regularly review entries to make sure they are accurate. This time around, the voice of the people helped create change.”

“Sometimes the team focus on topics highlighted by user feedback (such as last year’s petition about the definition of ‘woman’) and sometimes these topics are driven by current events or through projects taking place within the Oxford Languages team,” a spokesperson told CNN.

It’s not the first time OUP has updated its words. Recently, the dictionary for the English language has made changes to words related to race and gender identity. Earlier this year, OUP updated the use of “they” which is used as a pronoun by and for nonbinary people.

In 2019, OUP removed “sexist” terms for a woman after tens of thousands of people signed a Change.org petition.

In response to the petition, suggestive phrases about women were removed including “Ms September will embody the professional, intelligent yet sexy career woman,” according to CNN and phrases such as “I told you to be home when I get home, little woman.”

In a statement their definiitions, OUP wrote “Our dictionaries reflect, rather than dictate, how language is used… This is driven solely by evidence of how real people use English in their daily lives. With that in mind, lexicographers reviewed examples in its dictionary data to make sure representations of woman were positive and active.”

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com