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Takis vs. Flamin’ Hot Cheetos

Which Chip Takes the Cake?

It’s the age old question that has puzzled mankind for centuries: Takis or Flamin’ Hot Cheetos, man? Our judges snack their way to the bottom of this age-old riddle and choose a crunchy champion. Plus: Check out the Latina who has never tried either snack…wait how is that possible?

READ: Foods You Regret Eating After a Noche de Borrachera

Which is your favorite? Tell us below and don’t forget to share!

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Cheetos Without Chester? That’s The Future Of The Brand In Mexico Thanks To A Ban On Mascots

Culture

Cheetos Without Chester? That’s The Future Of The Brand In Mexico Thanks To A Ban On Mascots

Can you imagine your bag of hot cheetos without Chester on the front of it? What about your bowl of zucaritas without Tony the Tiger? Well, thanks to a new law in Mexico meant to help fight back against a growing epidemic of childhood obesity, that is the future of these beloved food brands in the country.

Mexico is one of the world’s most obese counties. It’s estimated that extreme obesity among children has now reached 15% and it’s even higher among adults.

Experts hope the new regulations will help inform consumers about unhealthy foods and restrict how such items are marketed towards young children.

Mexico has said one last adiós to Chester the Cheetah as the country moves to combat an obesity epidemic.

Thanks to a law passed in 2018, Mexico is officially saying goodbye to the cartoon cheetah that has symbolized the Cheetos snack on its packaging and in TV commercials since the mid-1980s.

The law banning Chester and other cartoon characters began taking effect last October when the packaging of food and beverage items high in sugar, salt, fats or calories started displaying uniform seals in large, striking black-and-white lettering announcing that they contained excessive levels.

The upcoming ban — on cartoon characters, drawings, and celebrity images on packaging — applies to foods and beverages that qualify for at least one of these government seals. It does not become obligatory for manufacturers until April, when other famous characters like Tony the Tiger — and Mexican packaging cartoon superstars like Rey Carlos V (a candy bar image), Melvin the Elephant (Choco-Krispies), and the gansito (a goose character featured on a popular snack cake packaging) will also disappear from Mexico’s store shelves.

This is the brand’s new look in Mexico.

Cheetos' new look.

In October 2018, when the regulations were passed, Katia Yetzani García of the nonprofit El Poder del Consumidor said they were based on the Pan American Health Organization’s statement that such marketing toward children takes advantage of their inexperience with advertising.

The secretary-general of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, Angel Gurría, said last year that “the incidence of overweight and obesity among the Mexican population has reached alarming levels,” with about 73% of Mexicans considered overweight. Childhood obesity, he said, has doubled from 7.5% in 1996 to 15% in 2016.

Chester the Cheetah has a long history with the brand.

Chester Cheetah was created for an ad agency in the United States in 1986 by Brad Morgan, whose voice was briefly featured in the original U.S. animated commercials. A Saturday morning cartoon around the character planned by the Fox network in the 1990s, Yo, It’s the Chester Cheetah Show, was scrapped after groups like the Action for Children’s Television raised strong objections to it as an insidious marketing tool directed at children.

Mexico is not the first country to do away with many of our beloved food mascots.

Mexico is not the first country in Latin America to get rid of cartoon mascots on unhealthy foods. Chile passed a similar law in 2015 against the packaging or advertising of foods high in calories, fat, salt, or sugar that uses “hooks” directed at minors under 14. As a result, most cereals and other “junk foods” in the country have packaging free of such imagery.

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Bad Bunny And Chester The Cheetah Are Teaming Up To Inspire You To ‘Deja Tu Huella’

Entertainment

Bad Bunny And Chester The Cheetah Are Teaming Up To Inspire You To ‘Deja Tu Huella’

Just last week, Bad Bunny was spotted on the streets of Boyle Heights (a predominately Latino neighborhood east of Los Angeles) with a bag of Hot Cheetos in his hand and a camera crew in tow. Obviously, his mere presence in the neighborhood caused a stir and fans were snapping as many photos as they were allowed to. He even got #BoyleHeights trending on Twitter.

Despite the chaos, none of us knew exactly what was going on. Sure, with the Hot Cheetos bag in his hands, many of us assumed there must be some sort of collaboration taking place – but what about?

Bad Bunny remained silent on the matter and so did Cheetos – until now.

Bad Bunny is partnering with Cheetos to launch the campaign ‘Deja Tu Huella’ – or ‘Leave Your Mark.’

Credit: Cheetos / Frito Lay

It’s been a ridiculously busy year for Bad Bunny. He’s given us two albums, performed a series of concerts (despite a pandemic), been featured on several magazine covers, dropped surprise tracks, given us a limited-edition Crocs collection, and he’s not done yet.

Now, the Puerto Rican artist is joining forces with Cheetos for its “Deja Tu Huella” campaign – a new multi-platform initiative designed to rally the next generation to leave their mark in their culture.

“This initiative is important because it’s the union of two brands, the commercials are amazing, and it’s an encouragement for the Latin community,” Bad Bunny says. “I feel proud because we are using our tools and the motivation to invite Latinos to leave their mark in what they love and to reach their goals whether it’s in music, sports, or the arts.”

Though the artist told Billboard that the campaign would become public so fast. Over the past weekend, he was spotted shooting scenes for the upcoming Cheetos commercial, and the secret was out. “I wasn’t expecting that. The word got around and it was like a sold-out concert,” he jokes.

Through “Deja Tu Huella,” Cheetos wants to celebrate and help lift up the Latino community.

Bad Bunny wants the world to know how proud he is of his Latino identity and he hopes to inspires others to feel the same way.

“I’m leaving my mark in many ways,” Benito told Billboard. “For me, it’s important to leave my mark with my creations in music but also as a human being. My music has traveled far around the world and 100 percent in Spanish with my Puerto Rican slang. Wherever I go, in every interview, I let everyone know that I am Latino and Puerto Rican and I think that I have left that mark well placed in the whole world,” he added.

But the partnership is more than just a campaign.

Cheetos, in collaboration with the singer’s Good Bunny Foundation, is giving back to the Hispanic community with a $500,000 commitment. This complements the recently announced PepsiCo and PepsiCo Foundation commitment to the Latino community with $170 million in support over five years to further build on its long-standing efforts to address racial inequality and create opportunity, according to an official press statement.

“It’s undeniable that Hispanic culture has shaped American pop culture. And it’s that culture that has inspired much of Cheetos initiatives in food, fashion, and entertainment,” said Marissa Solis, svp of marketing, Frito-Lay North America, in a statement. “On the heels of Hispanic Heritage Month, we’re proud to kick off a campaign that pays tribute to the Latinos who are pushing boundaries and rewriting the rules. And, we’ll have a lot of fun along the way when we see what Mr. Bunny and Mr. Chester has a store for fans this November.”

All the speculation started when Bad Bunny was spotted in an LA neighborhood sporting a bag of Hot Cheetos.

Just a week after his incredible performance at the Billboard Music Awards, the reggaetonero was spotted on the streets of Boyle Heights. Given the awards had taken place in LA, this wasn’t totally out of the norm.

But what really grabbed people’s attention were the camera crew – and the bright orange and red bag of Flamin’ Hot Cheetos in his hands.

Of course, rumors started swirling almost immediately that the “Yo Perreo Sola” singer was working on a collaboration with the popular chip brand but neither San Benito nor Cheetos had anything more to say on the matter.

And of course, fans in the area reacted the exact same why I would of if I saw Bad Bunny in mi barrio.

This woman walking her dog in the middle of the street and twerking her nalgas right at Bad Bunny, is the exact reaction I would of had too. And it seemed to have worked since you can very clearly see a reaction on his face.

How would you have reacted if Bad Bunny was filming a commercial on your street? While you were out walking your dog? Try and tell me you wouldn’t have done the same… I dare you.

The Bad Bunny and Cheetos collaboration will be unveiled on Nov. 22 during the 2020 American Music Awards, where he’s nominated for four awards. As part of the AMAs partnership, Cheetos is also sponsoring the expansion of the Latin award categories including favorite male artist, favorite female artist, favorite album, and favorite song.

Oh and one more thing…we now know the reggaetonero’s favorite Cheetos flavor.

Credit: Cheetos / Frito Lay

Get them while you can…because I’ll be buying up the entire supply so Benito has to place orders with me personally.

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