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Stereotypes Colombians Can’t Stand Hearing

Colombia has been declared “the happiest country in the world” on several occasions. But there are certainly plenty of things that make us Colombianos less than happy, like being asked if we carry coke at all times ?. Wanna see Colombianos smile again? Then stay clear of these stereotypes…

All Colombians Sound the Same

CREDIT: @JOTAPINEDACOMEDIANTE/ YOUTUBE

Few things are more annoying than having complete strangers say you don’t sound Colombian because you don’t have that accent. News flash: we’re not all from the same region.

All Colombian Women Look Like This

https://instagram.com/p/6oDRjpJF16/

Credit: stunningcollover / Instagram

Colombian women come on all shapes and sizes, including ladies of Afro and indigenous descendent. Oh yeah, not all of us got boob jobs for our quinces either.

Colombians are Addicted to Coffee

A photo posted by Fernanda Zapata (@luii_zapata) on

Every Colombian is a Drug Dealer

Colombian Women are Easy

A photo posted by Shakira (@shakira) on

Colombians are Only Good at Fútbol

CREDIT: @PAUVEGAFANS/ INSTAGRAM

While Colombia made it to the 2014 World Cup and played fairly well (James Rodriguez is like a God), soccer is not the only sport Colombians dominate. Catherine Ibargüen from Apartadó, Colombia is a Summer Olympics medalist in the high jump; tennis player Marianna Duque from Bogotá high rank sits at 90 worldwide and Rigoberto Urán won second place in the 2014 Giro D’Italia.

READ: Proof that @latinaprobs Understands Your Struggle More than Anyone Else

Every Colombian Abuses Cocaine

Colombia is a Third-World Country Where Tourists Get Kidnapped

 

Colombians are Only Made of Mulatos Dancing Salsa

Colombia = Guerrillas and Paramilitaries

Colombia is a Caribbean Country

A photo posted by Carolina Ardila (@carolinadu) on

Every Colombian is a Party Animal

Colombian Food is Spicy because All Latin Food is Spicy, Duh

Colombianos, what’s the most annoying stereotype you’ve heard? mitú wants to know. Let us know in the comments below. 

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Nicole Chapaval Advocates For More Latinas In Tech Through Teaching App Platzi

Fierce

Nicole Chapaval Advocates For More Latinas In Tech Through Teaching App Platzi

The gender disparity in STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) jobs remains wide in Colombia. As of 2019, Colombian women hold 32.9 percent of all STEM jobs in the country.

Nicole Chapaval, the VP of education at Platzi, wants to get more women into STEM. As someone who found herself in tech, Chapaval understands what it takes for women to break into the industry.

Chapaval’s own passion for computer science started in her youth. Despite wanting her parents’ reservations about her career choice, she went to school to study software engineering.

“I learned how to code with Platzi. I was a student back in 2012 before I worked here,” she told mitú.

Platzi is a professional learning app targeting people ages 22 and older.

Photo courtesy of Apple

Instructors for the app are teaching livestream courses on programming, marketing, design, and business. The classes are available in English and Spanish.

Chapaval took an interest in content optimization practicing her coding on a personal blog while taking online courses. Starting out as a student advocate, the two founders of Platzi noticed her dedication and started to involve her more in the team.

As Platzi expanded, so did Chapaval’s job description.

Chapaval has been successful in her career. Yet, despite the success, she has seen the gender disparity firsthand. It has only further inspired Chavapal to work to get more women in their tech careers.

“One of my first jobs was in a company that was doing mobile applications and in this company there were 15 male developers and myself,” she says.

Wanting to engage with her male colleagues, Chapaval admitted to feeling weird when her enthusiasm was not reciprocated.

“I was always very extroverted and wanted to meet everyone [but] they didn’t want to talk with me,” she says.

Chapaval teaches 60 percent of computer sciences courses hoping to attract more women to the field.

Photo courtesy of Apple

“I think that representation is very important. So I try to be very vocal and very present with everything that we do in social media and in content creation,” she says.

Whether it be attending company livestreams or podcasts, it is imperative for Chapaval to have women witness others in the field to show the possibilities they can achieve.

Prideful, she also amplifies the achievements of other Latinas in STEM, like that of Diana Trujillo. Yet, she still expresses a need for more women to get managerial roles.

“I am very proud of Trujillo,” she says. “She’s from my hometown and she was in the NASA project that launched the Perseverance Rover. These kinds of things are great!”

Thirty-six percent of Platzi‘s more than 1 million students are women and it is growing.

Photo courtesy of Apple

“That’s very low,” she says, “but we doubled that percentage from 2018 so we still have a long way to go.”

A key step needed to attract more students is accessibility, both financially and in content. Platzi, Chapaval mentions, offers free programming courses that aim to be accessible to those with low internet connection in all parts of Colombia and Latin America.

It’s not just about what you are learning as an individual, but also as a team or a group,” she says. “That also adds to the working ecosystem of Latin America.”

Regardless of gender, age, or background, Chapaval believes “education is very important if we want to break these blockers.”

In fact, two crucial skills she believes everyone should know is programming and English. “I like to say that both skills have to do with communications; communication with machines and with other people in the world,” she says.

In a time when remote jobs are pertinent due to the pandemic, having communication skills is a valuable asset for STEM careers in any country.

“Programming should be a basic skill that schools teach as well because it’s not only [beneficial] to be a developer,” Chapaval says. “It helps you understand how to solve problems in a logical way.”

Chapaval is grateful for her personal growth in STEM and hopes that Platzi can help others grow.

Photo courtesy of Apple

“I hope [students] can create what they dream of with the coding skills that they can get with us and can show it to the world,” she says.

“Latin America is a lovely region and a lot is happening here,” she says. “I hope that if this community can get to know each other and create the next big companies and big solutions for problems that we have right now, I would [be] fulfilled.”

As the gender disparity in STEM slowly expands, Chapaval continues to vouch for women to speak up and push through in the field.

Proudly Chapaval says, “Latinas are very extroverted, and the tech and software engineering world needs more extroverted people [like us] to add to their ecosystem.”

The App Store featured Platzi for Women’s History Month.

Read: She Came As A Teen From Colombia With Only $300 To Her Name, Now She’s a Director For NASA

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Meet Breakout Pop Star Camilo: Our 5 Favorite Songs on ‘Mis Manos’

Latidomusic

Meet Breakout Pop Star Camilo: Our 5 Favorite Songs on ‘Mis Manos’

Camilo is back with his new album Mis Manos. The Colombian singer-songwriter branches out into more genres on this 11-track LP.

Camilo was a songwriter before becoming a breakout pop star.

Before breaking out with last year’s Por Primera Vez album, Camilo was most known as a songwriter for other artists’ hits. He had a hand in writing Becky G and Natti Natasha’s 13-times Platinum smash “Sin Pijama” with his brothers-in-law Mau y Ricky. Camilo also wrote on songs like Bad Bunny’s “Si Estuviésemos Juntos,” Karol G and Gloria Trevi’s “Hijoepu*#,” and Lali’s “Sin Querer Queriendo.”

He received a Shakira co-sign early in his career.

In a lead-in to his Por Primera Vez album, Camilo released his breakthrough hit “Tutu” with Pedro Capó that won a Latin Grammy Award last November. Colombian superstar Shakira reached out to Camilo to jump on a remix of the song. He embraced Latin pop with reggaeton music influences on the LP. Por Primera Vez is currently nominated for a Grammy Award in the Best Latin Pop or Urban Album category.

Camilo and his signature handlebar mustache dabble in more diverse sounds on his latest album Mis Manos. Latido Music is here to highlight five of our favorite songs on the album.

“Vida de Rico”

Camilo first teased Mis Manos last year with “Vida de Rico.” His quirky spirit shines through the cute cumbia bop. This was also one of his first songs to go viral on TikTok thanks to the dancing that he did with his wife, Evaluna Montaner. She’s the daughter of Argentine legend Ricardo Montaner. Now Camilo is the most-followed Latin music artist on the platform with over 21.1 million followers.

@camilo

COREO DE #VidaDeRico @evaluna @paumacher (vean mi felicidad al final porque por fin pude hacerla Jajajaja)

♬ Vida de Rico – Camilo

“Tuyo y Mío” with Los Dos Carnales

Camilo took on mariachi music on Por Primera Vez with “La Mitad” featuring Mexican singer Christian Nodal. On Mis Manos, he tackles ranchera music with another Mexican act, Los Dos Carnales. Camilo hits his soulful stride in regional Mexican music and “Tuyo y Mío” is no different. Eso, Camilo!

“Mareado”

Camilo gets turnt in “Mareado.” He interestingly blends tropical music with a mariachi twist, all while enjoying a few chelas. This is definitely a contender for Song of the Summer. The beaches are waiting for this one.

“KESI”

Shakira really shined a light on the traditional Afro-Colombian dance champeta during her Super Bowl halftime show with Jennifer Lopez. Camilo was seemingly inspired by that because he comes through with the perfect breezy song for dancing the champeta. This is another TikTok dance challenge waiting to happen.

“Machu Picchu” with Evaluna Montaner

After first collaborating with his wife Evaluna on the Por Primera Vez title track, Camilo teams up with her again for the sexy pop bop “Machu Picchu.” Now a year into their marriage, the couple shares some intimate moments together in the music video.

Read: CNCO and Ricardo Montaner Perform “Tan Enamorados” Together at Premio Lo Nuestro

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