things that matter

During Her Enslavement This Woman Survived On Plastic Bags And Water From An Iron

Credit: @asilascosasw / Twitter

Ana Laura thought running away with her boyfriend at the age of 17 would result in a happily every after, but their love didn’t last long and she found herself alone and homeless in Mexico City.

After trying to find a safe place to live, a kind woman who owned a dry cleaner with her family, offered her a stable home.

That home, however, would soon turn into Ana Laura’s worst nightmare and it would last for five years. For that reason, Ana Laura now calls herself Zunduri, which means “beautiful girl” in Japanese.

zunduri

At first Zunduri was so moved by this woman’s kindness that she started calling calling her “mom” – but this would backfire on her.

Zunduri felt so close the woman that she started helping her, the woman’s husband, two daughters and sister run the family dry cleaning business. As time went on, the work increased daily and the food decreased to the point where she was ironing from 16 to 20 hours a day and only consuming water.

In one instance Zunduri went five days without eating. She started chewing plastic bags from the dry cleaner and taking water from the iron to survive.

The abuse was not just physical, but verbal and mental as well. “The first time she started kicking me. Then she said, ‘You have no right to talk back because I’m like a mother for you. If you call me ‘mother,’ you have to understand that mothers discipline their children,'” Zunduri said.

“She always tried to put things in my head like, ‘Your mom doesn’t love you. If she loved you, she would be here with you. If she loved you, she would’ve taken you back. The guy you left with didn’t love you either. He couldn’t stand you because you’re worthless as a woman,'” she said.

Just when Zunduri thought she couldn’t endure more torture, she was chained.

The chains were wrapped around her neck, but then moved to her waist so she could continue to iron. On top of that, every member of the family took turns burning her skin and face with an iron.

“Her captors would peel off the scabs from her skin. When she was healing from her burns and scabs would appear, they would yank them off so that they would bleed again,” said human rights activist and close friend of Zunduri, Karla de la Cuesta.

After being chained for six months, Zunduri was able to escape in April 2015 when she realized her chains were slightly loose.

The physical damage went well beyond the surface.

zunduri slave

When her body was examined, doctors discovered her organs resembled that of an 80-year-old.

Authorities raided the house where Zuduri was held captive. All five members face up to 40 years in prison.

zunduri captors

The family of captors was arrested on charges of human trafficking and exploitation.

Zunduri is celebrating her first year of freedom and has become an activist to tell the world her story.

zunduri papa

Read more about Zunduri’s incredible story here

READ: By Day He Herds Cattle and Moonlights as a Cartel Killer

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What The Hell Was That, Sounds Of Mexico City Edition

Culture

What The Hell Was That, Sounds Of Mexico City Edition

omgitsjustintime / Instagram

Cities are notoriously noisy chaotic places. They’re filled with the soundtrack of people going about their daily lives, pets jockeying for attention, the sounds of commerce and industry…now imagine these sounds in a Mexican city of more than 20 million people.

Welcome to Mexico City.

All cities are noisy. But Mexico City takes it to another decibel. The capital is full of sounds that could be rich, beautiful, and also as annoying AF. After all, it’s the most populous city in North America — and quite likely the loudest.

Here are some of the most Mexican sounds of CDMX:

Some sounds have become iconic, such as the voice blasted from the recycling trucks that slowly circle the city, seeking mattresses, appliances, and other household items too bulky for the garbage truck. The truck drivers used to signal their presence themselves via loudspeakers until one of them thought to record his daughter making the announcement.

The recording spread and is now heard across the country and in some Mexican immigrant neighborhoods in the United States. The young girl’s whiny plea for “colchones, tambores, refrigeradores” was even remixed into an electronic dance song that has become a hit at parties.

Even the way Chilangos (people from CDMX) take out their trash is noisy AF.

Take the high-pitched hand bell that rings incessantly each day, signaling that the garbage truck has arrived in the neighborhood and it’s time to haul out the trash. In many Mexico City neighborhoods, this is the most common daily sound – so common, many use it as their daily alarm clock because the guys are so punctual. They arrive on your street with the clanging of a cowbell and possibly some yelling and it’s your responsibility to get your garbage out to them before they haul off.

And natural gas…now that’s a scream I won’t soon forget.

There is the guttural cry of “gaaaaasssss” from the man who sells canisters of fuel. Most buildings in Mexico City don’t have a pipe connection to a central gas line so we all have gas tanks on our rooftops (super safe, I know!) Thankfully, guys come in their trucks often enough with the downright eerily scream of “gaaaaaaaaass” to sell you refills for your gas tanks.

Or the flute whistle of the knife sharpener, passing with his pushcart.

You’ll hear him before you see him and you’ll need to gritar down at him to get him to stop. But are you sure that’s the knifeman and not a cute sounding bird?

There’s the deafening steam scream of the camote man.

The blood-curdling loud hiss that announces the arrival of the camote man, who sells hot sweet potatoes sprinkled with cinnamon and drizzled with condensed milk, is many people’s favorite sound to hate.

He doesn’t yell words at you. His pushcart literally screams and hisses at you. Loudly. For elongated periods of time. To the point where you flinch and cover your ears if you’re too close because he must have blown both of his at a cumbia concert. His cart is decked out with a wood-burning stove that generates the steam to cook some of the best tasting roasted sweet potatoes and bananas you’ll ever have. And they come covered in la lechera with a side of “omg my poor ears!”

And the borderline creepy organilleros.

Think of a jack-in-the-box. The one old-school kids used to crank and could never quite tell when a frighteningly happy clown on a spring would pop out. Remember that tune? The creepy music that was meant to be cheerful, but was always put into a minor key and inserted into scary movie trailers? The organillero is a real-life version of all of this.

It didn’t always use to be, though. Back in the 1890s, when it first made its appearance in the city, men would play charming melodies, even accompanied by monkeys at times, as people strolled along on a Sunday afternoon, requesting popular tunes (since radio didn’t exist yet) and tipping an extra ten pesos into the hat of the monkey.

Nowadays? Not so much. Doing some research, it appears that the instruments are easily damaged due to rain. And with the abundant amount of rain that this city sees, it’s no wonder that almost everyone you hear is out of tune. Most of the people still cranking them can’t afford to fix them and have no other way to make money. Though annoying, it is pretty sad. The next time you’re in a plaza or a hear one in the street, think of the 75-pound instrument on their back (yeah, these things are heavy) and consider having some sympathy.

Plus, there’s a constant reminder to buy tamales.

Any man who knows me knows that food is a pretty easy way to win me over. (Buy me a wheel of cheese over flowers any day.) So naturally, you’d think the tamale man would have a masa-wrapped key to my heart. Right?

Wrong. I’ve never slept with the tamale man, but he’s woken me up at least three times a week since I’ve lived here. He’s also constantly outside blasting his recording a la Say Anything.

Another automated recording, the tamales Oaxaquenos sellers pedal through Mexico City’s streets starting at dusk and long into the night selling warm Oaxacan tamales wrapped in sweating banana leaves and hot atole from giant Gatorade coolers. Mostly young men, the tamal guys always seem a little lonely to me as they pedal through the streets to this nasal theme song.

And we can’t forget how much Chilangos love honking their car horns.

This is the worst one. A city of more than 20 million people means way too many cars for one place, and with a traffic system worse than any Hot Wheels track I built as a kid, people have no idea what else to do besides honk. All. The. Time. And always for longer than just a few seconds. They also just love mimicking a honk when someone else does it.

Beyond those sounds, Mexico City is also characterized by the constant hum of music — the cumbias that thump from taxis, the street performers strumming acoustic covers of 1970s rock and the mariachis roaming the streets, looking for the next table of sentimental drunks to serenade. It can cause conflict — after all, not every person wants to hear the reggaeton hit “Despacito” played on repeat at the store beneath their apartment.

Chilangos are sometimes said to sing their Spanish.

Unlike in the Caribbean, where Spanish is spoken in rapid fire and the ends of phrases are sometimes skipped altogether, words here are lovingly drawn out, the vowels accentuated, each sentence teeming with life.

The city sings too. Unless you’re in a rotten mood, in which case it sometimes seems to scream.

Naked Cyclists Took To The Streets Of Mexico City To Protest And OMG My Eyes

Things That Matter

Naked Cyclists Took To The Streets Of Mexico City To Protest And OMG My Eyes

ikarorayenari / Instagram

The World Naked Bike Ride is a growing movement of naked cyclists taking to the streets in cities across the world.

They ride naked to bring attention to climate change, toxic car culture, bike safety, and so much more, leaving tias and abuelas in shock everywhere.

And this past weekend, the World Naked Bike Ride came to Mexico City for the 13th time and it was the city’s largest one yet.

The crowds came out to protest the city’s heavy reliance on cars and the toxic car culture that makes it downright dangerous to ride a bike.

Each and every day some 8 million cars take to the streets and contribute to the city’s notorious traffic. But they also form a huge part of the city’s problem with record-breaking pollution that often reaches crisis levels.

The route took riders through the city’s most popular neighborhoods and along its busiest streets.

Credit: @RodadaCDMX / Twitter

From the famed Palacio de Bellas Artes along Paseo Reforma – the city’s main boulevard – to the Monumento de la Revolucion, this year’s WNBR didn’t go unnoticed.

Being noticed was exactly their point.

Credit: @Erch_A / Twitter

In a city where accidents with bicycles happen all too often, these riders wanted to grab the attention of motorists. Many are hoping events like this will create greater awareness of bike safety.

Mexico City already has hundreds of miles of dedicated bike lanes, but even these can be dangerous for cyclists. They’re often blocked by cars or used by motorcycle drivers.

Biking wasn’t the only option as the route was joined by rollerbladers and skateboarders.

Credit: @PepillusColi / Twitter

It’s estimated that some 3,000 people joined this year’s WNBR in Mexico City, making it the largest the city has seen in its 13 years of hosting the event.

And some riders used the event to call attention to other issues.

Credit: @atarashinamae / Twitter

When you’re naked and riding through the city’s most popular districts, you’re going to get people’s attention. So it’s a good time to give a shout out to issues like women’s rights, environmental justice, and LGBT equality.

Twitter was full of reactions including a few jokes here and there…

Credit: @nowthisnews / Twitter

I mean if anybody’s private parts are hanging down to the chain, I think they already have bigger problems.

Others wish they could unsee what they had just seen.

But in their defence, sometimes you have to be a little controversial if you want to get noticed. So good for them for doing what they have to do to draw attention to the very real issues of violence against women, climate change, toxic car culture, and bike safety.

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