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11 Rules Every Latino Unconsciously Lives By

rules latinos live by
@eu_vivitudoisso/Instagram

Let’s face it. Not only is our culture embedded in our DNA, it’s also super-apparent in our habits. Don’t believe it? You’re more Latino than you think and these rules will prove it.

Never Arrive Before the Party Starts

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Totally me this am… #Stuck #OnMyWay

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Respect Thy Mamá

Don’t Speak When He’s Speaking

Bribe Younger Siblings

Never Say No to Carne Asada

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Always Cook in Large Amounts

LATINOSEATING

Meemees Always Takes Priority

Don’t Say No to Abuelita

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Think Before You Act Because “God Sees Everything”

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Use Abuelita as Your Protector

You’re in Command When Mom’s Away… with the Help of Backup

Here Are 15 Times That Google Paid Tribute To Latinx Culture With The Google Doodle

Culture

Here Are 15 Times That Google Paid Tribute To Latinx Culture With The Google Doodle

Google

September 22nd marks Doodle Day — yes, it’s a thing! Since 2004 Doodle Day has helped raise funds for epilepsy research. “The tagline ‘Drawing a line through epilepsy’ heads the campaign, and participants take part by submitting their doodle, along with a small donation. The Doodle Day team then judges the doodles and awards prizes accordingly,” according to Days Of The Year

There aren’t many doodles with as much reach as Google doodles, which serve as way to educate and inform people all over the world about global history. Of course, Latinxs have been contributing to arts, science, and culture for centuries. 

Check out these 15 Google Doodles that honor Latinx culture and history. 

Mercedes Sosa

Born in 1936, Argentinian singer Mercedes Sosa was known for being the “voice of the voiceless ones.” Nicknamed “La Negra” her social justice lyrics and traditional folk music allowed her to perform at Lincoln Center, Carnegie Hall, the Sistine Chapel, and the Colosseum in Rome.

Chile’s National Day

The country’s official flag since 1817 commemorates a multiday celebration known as Las Fiestas Patrias to honor Chile’s eight-year struggle for self-determination from Spanish colonial rule. 

Lupicínio Rodrigues

Lupicínio Rodrigues was born in 1914 in Brazil, today his name is “synonymous with the musical genre samba-canção, also known as samba triste or ‘sad samba.’”

Ynés Mexía

In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, Mexican American botanist and explorer Ynes Mexia received this tribute. In 1925, Mexía traveled to Sinaloa, Mexico to find rare botanical species. On the trip, she fell off a cliff, fractured her hand and ribs, and still managed to return home with 500 species, 50 of which were undiscovered. 

Tin Tan

The actor, singer, and comedian Tin Tan was born in Mexico City in 1915. Tin Tan helped to popularize pachuco culture with films like The Jungle Book and The Aristocats.

Eduardo Ramírez Villamizar

Born in Pamplona, Colombia in 1922, Villamizar was an innovative painter and sculptor. After traveling to Paris and New York in the 1950s to much acclaim, he became a pioneer of abstract Colombian art. 

Ignacio Anaya García

Ignacio Anaya García’ was born in 1895. In 1943, García invented nachos. What more needs to be said about the magnitude of his culinary contributions? Nachos! 

Arantza Peña Popo  

Afro-Columbian artist Arantza Peña Popo made history when she won Google’s “Doodle For Google” contest in 2019. The art entitled “Once you get it, give it back” features two generations of Afro-Latinx mothers and daughters.

Dr. Matilde Montoya

The first female physician in Mexico, born in 1859, Dr. Matilde Montoya petitioned President Porfirio Díaz to be allowed into medical school. Dr. Montoya had already earned her degree as a midwife at 16, but she wanted more. Dr. Montoya paid her success forward. After her application was accepted, she demanded the House of Representatives to change the rules and permanently allow female students into the School of Medicine.

Lucha Reyes

Born into poverty in 1936, Peruvian singer Lucha Reyes beat the odds by becoming one of the country’s most adored singers. Reyes helped to popularize the Afro-Peruvian genre of music música criolla which blended Creole, Afro-Peruvian, and Andean musical traditions.

Evangelina Elizondo

Mexican actress Evangelina Elizondo was born in 1929. She would become a star of Mexican Cinema’s Golden Age. Fun fact: this Google doodle was created by the Mexican guest artist Valeria Alvarez. 

Abraham Valdelomar

Writer and caricaturist Abraham Valdelomar was born in 1888 in Peru. A humorous prodigy, Valdelomar is remembered for his cuentos criollos. In 1916, he founded the literary magazine Colónida, which helped Peruvians discovered fresh literary talent like José María Eguren.

Raúl Soldi  

Argentinian artist Raúl Soldi was born in Buenos Aires in 1905. Soldi was a painter, costume designer, and even did department store windows.

“Recognized in his country and globally, a 1992 retrospective at Argentina’s Palais de Glace attracted some 500,000 visitors and his work was honored with an award at the 1958 Biennale of São Paulo, Brazil.”

Simón Rodríguez  

Venezuela’s Simón Rodríguez devoted his life to educating others. A scholar, philosopher, and teacher born in Caracas in 1771, he would prove to be a precocious student. As a teacher, among his students Simón Bolivar, he proposed creating well-funded, well-trained schools that included students of all ethnicities and social backgrounds. 

Mexican Independence Day

Mexican guest artist Dia Pacheco created this Google doodle to commemorate Mexico’s Independence Day. Inspired by indigenous Mexican crafts and textiles like Oaxacan embroidery and children’s toys, the animated rehiletes are a beautiful homage.

These Día De Los Muertos Inspired Tattoos Will Make You Want To Get Inked Right Away

Fierce

These Día De Los Muertos Inspired Tattoos Will Make You Want To Get Inked Right Away

As Fall begins to slowly cool the weather outside, we begin to think about the spooky season and all the things that come with it. It isn’t just Halloween that we’re looking forward to. We also have Día de  Los Muertos to anticipate. 

Observed by the people of central and south Mexico, The Day of the Dead is a celebration of ancestors and life on the other side of death. It has also become a holiday that has fed into our collective pop culture with images of its sugar skulls, marigolds and monarch butterflies. These images have worked their way into artwork and have especially become popular subjects of tattoos. 

With that in mind, we found some breathtaking Día de Los Muertos tattoos. Maybe they’ll inspire you to get some Day of the Dead ink as well. 

1. This watercolor beauty.

Instagram / @piotr.balcerak.tattoo

What makes this sketchy and bold tattoo brilliant is its watercolor style. Mimicking the freedom and flow that watercolor paintings have, watercolor tattoos venture outside line art to bleed color into the canvass. This intricate skull is a great example of this tattoo style. 

2. The OG skeleton prince.

Instagram / @somozaart

One of the most recognizable skull daddies gets a Día de Los Muertos makeover in this black and white tattoo. Jack Skeleton looks like a natural all decked out with common designs typically seen on sugar skulls. The skeleton might be the Pumpkin King but he looks like the King of the Dead in this tattoo.

3. *Mariachi music intensifies.*

Instagram / @yamambatattooshop

What’s more Mexican than authentic mariachi music? A mariachi skull musician. Dressed as a traditional mariachi, this skull comes complete with a sombrero and a guitar. We can just imagine him yelling a grito as he begins his next song.

4. Hummingbird of the dead.

Instagram / @carinathebarber

This tattoo captures the delicacy of one of Mexico’s most lovely creatures. This hummingbird takes flight on colorful wings and its boldly displayed skeleton against a Mayan background. 

5. Dia de Los Meowtos

Instagram / @necromandi 

Commemorating these cute little toe beans, this tattoo features a small calavera and a Mexican cempasúchil blossom. The Mexican cempasúchil or marigold is used on ofrendas and graves to honor departed ancestors.

6. Skeleton queen.

Instagram / @luckybirdtattoo

Besides calaveras, Día de Los Muertos tats often feature female sugar skulls. This one, for example, shows a skeleton beauty adorned with a crown of skulls, bones and marigold petals. 

7. A Mexican-American beauty.

Instagram /@sasquatch_linked

This sugar skull girl combines two cultures into one to show off a love of both countries. With roses in her hair that are colored to represent the Mexican and United States flags, this tattoo embodies its wearer’s Mexican-American identity.

8. This macabre mandala. 

Instagram / @shane.ryan.ink

Mandalas are a common element in tattoos. It’s a geometric figure representing the universe in Hindu and Buddhist symbolism. This mandala got a Day of the Dead upgrade with the addition of identical calaveras. 

9. An undead Disney princess. 

Instagram / @aevrard_

The guaranteed way to make a beloved figure even better is to give them the Día de las Muertos treatment. In this tattoo, Disney beauty Belle becomes a sugar skull girl and is adorned with a crown of flowers.

10. A sacred heart/skeleton combo.

Instagram / @richardpevahouse

The sacred heart is another identifiable subject in tattoos and is meant to symbolize the heart of Christ. This Day of the Dead calavera sports his own sacred heart, positively bursting from his chest in this dynamic piece.

11. Decked out in roses and jewels.

Instagram / @ink848

This tattoo takes a harsh subject matter a skull and makes it delicate and beautiful with the addition of jewelry and roses. The light gray shading gives it an even softer look. 

12. A Day of the Dead matruschka

Instagram / @dappertattoo

Here’s another collab between cultures with a Día de los Muertos matruschka. The Russian nesting doll is painted as an adorable sugar skull in a truly unique piece of artwork. 

13. Dia de Spidey.

Instagram / @gonzoetattoos

We might see this web slinger paroling the streets of Mexico City. Spider Man looks like a regular sugar skull with a few added decorations to his mask. 

14. *A wild Cubone appeared!*

Instagram / @missmarilyn_tattoos

Since this Pokémon already comes with his own skull helmet, it seems only naturally for it to be decorated for Day of the Dead. This tattoo is extremely creative and is definitely an unforgettable bit of art. 

15. A stylized Catrina.

Instagram / @peco_wolftown 

 La Calavera Catrina has become an icon of the Day of the Dead since she was first etched by Mexican artist José Guadalupe Posada back in 1910. This tattoo offers Catrina a modern makeover. Her blank stare is positively eerie and give us major creepy vibes.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ygZXhDiueo