Entertainment

What You Need to Know about the Rebelde Cast Since Their Breakup

Credit: @anahi / Instagram

It’s hard to believe that it has been over nine years since the last episode of Rebelde aired and six years since RBD, the real life musical group born of the telenovela, disbanded. Tragic, we know ?. So what’s the crew up to now?

Dulce María

Roberta Pardo

Dulce María played the part of la Rebelde más Rebelde, Roberta Pardo.

Since playing Roberta Pardo, Dulce María continued singing and acting. She signed with Universal Music in 2009 and has released two solo albums. She’s kept her acting chops by staring in both telenovelas and feature films like Mujeres Asesinas and Mentir Para Vivir.

Christopher Uckermann

Diego Bustamante

Remember rich kid hijo de papi hottie Uckermann as Diego Bustamante?

KDABRA

A photo posted by Christopher Uckermann (@christopheruck) on

After Rebelde and RBD, Uckermann starred in the television show Kdabra, released the album Somos in 2010 and scared fans when he was in a motorcycle accident in 2014. Thankfully he and his face are fine.

Quiz: Which “Rebelde” Character Are You?

Anahí

Mia Colucci

Mia Colucci was the ever so sassy Rebelde character that Anahí so unforgettably portrayed.

No shrinking violet, Anahí launched a solo singing career and continues to act. Oh, and she married the Manuel Velasco Coello, the governor of Chiapas this year so you know she’s kinda busy as the (fashionable) first lady of the Mexican state.

Christian Chávez

Giovanni Mendez

Chavez played Giovanni Mendez, the sentimental, yet flamboyant character.

Si no puedes ver lo que vales … Es probable que te estés juntando con quien tampoco lo ve … #happyfriday #viernes

A photo posted by Christian Chávez (@christianchavezreal) on

Credit: @christianchavezreal / Instagram

Right away you will notice that his hair is a tad toned down than during his Rebelde days. He’s released two albums: Almas Trasparentes and Esencial since leaving RBD and has appeared in a couple of reality shows as well. Also, in 2013 he faked his own death on Twitter…not really sure what that was about.

READ: Mexico Has No Problem Admitting They Stole These Telenovelas

Alfonso Herrera

Miguel Arango

Herrera stole the hearts of many as Miguel Arango. I mean, look at that face ?.

Gracias ??

A photo posted by Alfonso Herrera (@ponchohd) on

Since leaving RBD, Herrera has dedicated himself to his acting career and kept quite busy doing films, movies and even the Netflix original series Sense 8.

Maite Perroni

Lupita Fernandez
Credit: Rebelde / Televisa / rebeldecitou / Tumblr

Good girl Lupita Fernández was sweetly played by Maite Perroni.

Let’s be honest, we thought Anahí would become the next Thalía, but Perroni has been kicking ass and takin’ names since leaving RBD. She’s been en un friego de telenovelas, including lead roles alongside hottie William Levy, and she’s killing it as a singer with hits like “A Querer Volver.”

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The Russian App FaceApp Is Terrifying Some But Some Of These Photos Of Latino Celebs Are Just Too Good To Miss

Entertainment

The Russian App FaceApp Is Terrifying Some But Some Of These Photos Of Latino Celebs Are Just Too Good To Miss

FaceApp

By now you’re probably fully aware of FaceApp and their whole “we own your photos and do whatever we want with them forever” terms of use, but that certainly doesn’t make the novelty of the aging-app any less fun. Plus, for those of us who’ve already used it, the damage is done — so, uh, YOLO we guess. In truth, FaceApp’s terms of use are very similar to most of the apps we frequently use on a daily basis like SnapChat or Instagram, so you’ve probably already given up a significant portion of your privacy anyway.

We’re all doomed and this won’t be the death stroke. Just relax and settle into looking old now, while you can, before the apocalypse precludes that.

And the icing on the cake are these 13 LAtino celebrities who either took the FaceApp challenge or we did it for them.

1. J Balvin

Credit: Getty Images / FaceApp

Well this is just unfortunate. Sure the photo being in black and white probably doesn’t help much but OMG this is probably the worst of the FaceApp photos I’ve seen so far. Thankfully, he’s still an amazing musician and though his looks may fade he’ll always have that.

2. Maluma

Credit: maluma / Instagram / FaceApp

Ok…#swoon. Maluma baby is giving me full on zaddy vibes and I don’t care if he’s sixty years old I want this man now and forever.

3. Becky G

Credit: Getty Images / FaceApp

Looking fierce as ever.

4. Luis Fonsi

Right…so here’s the thing. Luis is already a good looking guy. I mean look at that hunk of a man. Goergeous. Those arms. And if Luis Fonsi has those same arms at 50 or 60 then I’m totally on-board with old Luis.

5. Shakira

Shakira looks like a timeless beauty in this photo and we know that age will be good to her as she gets older.

6. Cardi B

Credit: Getty Images / FaceApp

In a since-deleted Instagram post, Cardi B predicted this is how she’ll probably look at 80. I mean if that’s Cardi at 80…science must have found a fix for aging.

7. Daddy Yankee

View this post on Instagram

El Sugar Daddy 👨🏽‍🦳😂

A post shared by Daddy Yankee (@daddyyankee) on

Maybe we need to start calling him Daddy Yankee the Sugar Daddy…?

8. Mario Lopez

Mario Lopez proves he’ll never be too old for those AC Slater vibes.

9. Camila Cabello

Credit: Getty Images / FaceApp

I feel like Camila will definitely have a future in telenovelas as the villain.

10. Natti Natasha

Credit: Getty Images / FaceApp

Natti is kind of giving me Demi Moore vibes and I’m totally her for it.

11. Don Omar

Ayyyñ Don Omar…pobrecito. Ageing does not look like it will be kind to you.

12. Ricky Martin

Again, absolute pure zaddy vibes. 100%. Ricky Martin is already a total DILF but this FaceApp takes it to the next level.

13. Demi Lovato

Ok…so Demi Lovato just doesn’t age at all? What gives? Fierce and as beautiful as ever.

Latin America Has Its Own Amazing Comic Book Tradition And These Iconic Titles Prove It

Entertainment

Latin America Has Its Own Amazing Comic Book Tradition And These Iconic Titles Prove It

mexicoretro / valenzrc / Instagram

Even though Marvel and DC Comics superhero comics are obviously very popular in Latin America (as they are in the rest of the world), the region has developed its own comic book industry. This industry has given birth to iconic characters. These characters and stories speak directly to Latin American reality and identity. They deal with challenges such as economic crisis, class division, racism, and State repression. Of course, they do this in an often funny way. Other comics have achieved cult status even if their quality is, well, not of the highest standards. These are ten titles that speak of the depth and breathe of Latin American creativity. 

Title: Condorito
Country of origin: Chile
So when was it first published? It has been published since 1949
Created by: René Ríos, known as Pepo

Credit: condoritooficial / Instagram

The adventures of a Chilean condor that lives among humans is told in short vignettes that always end with a character passing out and the iconic word PLOP. Simple stories deal, however, with issues such as unemployment, the military dictatorship in Chile and class division. Condorito is a working-class everyman who faces class discrimination. Before Pinochet took power the comic was a bit conservative, mocking hippies and left-wing politicians, but after the coup, it changed and silently denounced the dictatorship. A 3D animated movie was released in 2017, with iconic characters such as Cabeza de Huevo, Garganta de Lata and Pepe Cortisona. 

Title: La familia Burrón
Country of origin: Mexico
So when was it first published? 1948
Created by: Gabriel Vargas

Credit: peltre.cuina.mexicana / Instagram

It was published for 60 years and told half a million copies, a huge number by Mexican publishing standards. Cuevas got into the hearts and minds of a lower-class Mexico City family. It is a linguistic jewel: it used slang, Prehispanic words and invented words that appealed to the creativity of chilango vernacular. Vargas’s main influence was American comics, but he soon developed a style that was unique and influences generations of Latin American comic book artists. 

And this family is a true icon of Mexico City

Credit: yosoymims / Instagram

Up until today, this family is venerated by Mexicans. There are multiple murals, toys and museum exhibitions dedicated to the Burrones. A true representation of 20th century Mexican idiosyncrasy. 

Title: Las aventuras de Capulina
Country of origin: Mexico
So when was it first published? 1970s
Created by: Oscar González Guerrero on a character created by Gaspar Henaine Pérez

Comic books in the U.S. are an internationally known community of superheroes but Latin America boasts its own impressive rooster of comic superheroes.
Credit: mexicoretro / Instagram

Gaspar Henaine Pérez, better known as Capulina, was a comedian that became iconic on the 1970s and 1980s. He had a television show and a very successful duo with Marco Antonio Campos, better known as Viruta. The character of Capulina gained huge popularity in a comic book series with stories by comic artist Oscar González Guerrero and art by his son Oscar Gonzalez Loyo. 

Title: El libro vaquero
Country of origin: Mexico
So when was it first published? 1978
Created by: Mario de la Torre Barrón, c

Credit: 99.hawells / Instagram

A classic of Mexican kitsch! NSFW content that has plenty of blood and plenty of sex. It was considered mass entertainment for the lower classes but is now being reinterpreted as an important cultural icon that deals with gender, sex and national identity. As the title suggests, it all happens in a microcosm of cowboys and saloons. This comic book has enrolled some famous writers, such as Jordi Soler, to write stories, as it is now a cultural icon, popular among hipsters. 

Title: Memín Pinguín (yes, this one is quite problematic)
Country of origin: Mexico
So when was it first published? 1962-2010
Created by: Yolanda Vargas Dulché

Credit: miguelf039 / Instagram

First things first: this is a very controversial title because of how the Afro-Mexican main character is drawn, and because of the ways in which other characters refer to him. There are plenty of stereotypes here, but also a denouncement of racism. The class division in Mexico is also referred to when a rich student is enrolled in a public school and faces the wrath of the proletariat. An interesting object of study that makes us think of how representations of race that might have been seen as innocent at the time gain new dimensions as the effects of stereotypes are better understood. 

Title: Kaliman
Country of origin: Mexico
So when was it first published? 1965 (previously a radio show from 1963)
Created by: Modesto Vázquez González (radio show), Hector González Dueñas (Víctor Fox) y Clemente Uribe Ugarte (comic book)

Credit: valenzrc / Instagram

During the 1960s Mexico was a cultural powerhouse in the continent and Kaliman is good proof of this. The superhero was originally just a voice on the radio, but then became a comic book that was published for 26 uninterrupted years, which spanned 1351 issues. Kaliman is a superhero of unknown origin who was raised in India and fights alongside an Egyptian kid named Solin. Kaliman practices multiple martial arts and goes to mystical places like Tibet! A true transnational creation generated in Latin America

Title: Mafalda (but of course we couldn’t possibly forget her!)
Country of origin: Argentina
So when was it first published? 1964-1973
Created by: Quino

Credit: Giphy

More of a comic strip rather than a comic book, Mafalda is a young girl who hates soup, loves her family and despairs at the state of the world. Argentina’s answer to Charlie Brown and the Peanuts series is a funny, nostalgic and thought-provoking universe in which childhood’s point of view reveals the idiocy of the adult world. Mafalda is a symbol of pacifism and a true icon of Argentina. 

Title: Love and Rockets
Country of origin: United States
So when was it first published? 1981
Created by:the Hernandez brothers: Gilbert, Jaime, and Mario.

Credit: Love and Rockets / Fantagraphics Books

Perhaps the most daring and iconic comic book to come out of the Latino community in the United States. This universe of interrelated storylines have traits that make it uniquely Latino: some stories take place in the Central American fictional village of Palomar, while others have magical realism elements. The Locas series focuses on Maggie and Hopey, one of the first queer couples in the American comic book tradition. 

Title: Turey El Taíno
Country of origin: Puerto Rico
So when was it first published? 1989
Created by: Ricardo Álvarez-Rivón

Credit: n-14515802384n8gk. Digital image. Ilustra.org

A unique comic book in that it shows how an indigenous community, the Tainos of what is now Puerto Rico, lived before colonization by the Spanish. It shows the cultural richness of the island in pre-Columbus days and brings back indigenous words and tools. A real standout! 

Title: Elpidio Valdés
Country of origin: Cuba
So when was it first published? 1970
Created by: Juan Padrón

Credit: elpidio4(1). Digital image. Cuba Literaria

A true Cuban classic and perhaps the most famous comic book to come out of the island. In a truly nationalistic spirit (some might argue that these comic books are in fact propaganda), the story takes place in the nineteenth-century war of independence that Cubans waged against Spain. Elpidio Valdés is a multiplatform narrative, as there are movies and cartoons about this historical character.

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