Culture

How Well Do You Know Colombian Slang?

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Colombia is more than coffee, reinas de belleza and cocaine. Test your knowledge of Colombian slang.

Eva Longoria And Michael Peña Are Here To School Us All On The Art Of Mexican Slang

Entertainment

Eva Longoria And Michael Peña Are Here To School Us All On The Art Of Mexican Slang

Eva Longoria and Michael Peña may be two of Hollywood’s biggest Mexican-American stars, but now they can add teaching to their long list of experience.

You’re probably thinking, neta? Yes, really! Okay, well, technically…

Longoria and Peña, who are starring in this summer’s live-action Dora the Explorer film as Dora’s mother and father respectively, Dora and the Lost City of Gold, sat down with Vanity Fair to teach us (and test their own knowledge) Mexican slang. Whether you’re Mexican or not, you’ve probably heard a few of these classic phrases floating around. For example, “no manches,” which Peña explains has a lot of different definitions depending on the context, but generally translates to “get out of here” or “shut up” when responding to something that’s surprising or you just can’t believe. But these two can definitely explain it better than I can.

The definition and use of terms such as chicano, pedo, chamba, naco, among a ton of others are also broken down by the Dora and the Lost City of Gold actors in this hilarious video.

Now, be honest, how many of these do you use on a daily basis? Or how many did you have no idea what they actually meant?

The 44-year-old Corpus Christi native and the 43-year-old Chicago-born Narcos: Mexico actor aren’t the first to be recruited by Vanity Fair to teach us Mexican slang. In 2017, while on a press run for her film How to Be a Latin Lover, Salma Hayek sat in the tutorial hot seat to challenge others in the art of Mexican slang. The 52-year-old actress, who was born in Mexico, listed a few of the same phrases as shared by Longoria and Peña, but also explained the meaning behind several expressions such as “no mames,” “hombres malos,” “eso que ni que,” “tienes feria,” and “me vale madres.”

I think it’s safe to say that Salma Hayek taught us a lot of important ones here, amirite?

With Peña and Longoria’s new film, it’s probably important to become acquainted with a few of these phrases—Dora is, after all, an iconic Latina character. And the latest live-action movie features a number of Mexican and Mexican-American actors (Peña, Longoria, Eugenio Derbez, Danny Trejo, Adriana Barraza Isela Vega), so who knows if some of these terms will make their way to this big screen debut.

Based on Nickelodeon’s highly popular educational pre-school series, Dora the ExplorerDora and the Lost City of Gold follows a teenaged Dora (played by Isabela Moner) as she heads off to high school—which just might be her biggest and most challenging adventure yet. The quirky fun film sends Dora off on a mission to track down her parents, who are in need of saving, and enlists the help of her friends, including her primo Diego (played by Jeff Wahlberg) and monkey Boots. Along the way, she comes across familiar faces, like Swiper the Fox (voiced by Benicio del Toro)—who remembers the catchphrase, swiper no swiping?—while also trying to solve the mystery behind a lost Incan civilization.

The character of Dora the Explorer has played such an important role for Latino and non-Latino children alike.

Ok, so perhaps not teaching them Mexican slang like our friends Eva Longoria, Michael Peña and Salma Hayek, but most definitely teaching them Spanish. That was the case for one of those behind this new live-action take on Dora.

“My daughter knows Spanish because of Dora,” Dora and the City of Gold director James Bobin told the Los Angeles Times. “When she was little, I remember saying to her once, ‘What’s your favorite animal?’ And she said, ‘Ardilla.’ And I went, ‘A deer?’ and got a picture from a book of a deer. And she goes, ‘No, no, no, no, ardilla’ and pointed out the window [because] ardilla in Spanish is squirrel.”

And like its cartoon counterpart, Dora and the City of Gold hopes to appeal to all audiences. “The beautiful thing of the story is that thematically, it’s pretty universal,” Eva Longora said in an interview with the Los Angeles Times. “I think everybody’s going to understand it and relate to it. You don’t have to be Latino, but it is a celebration of our culture within the movie. Our language is in it, people who [reflect] our community are in it, it’s organically Latino. It wasn’t like ‘Insert Latino here.’ ”

Dora and the Lost City of Gold is in theaters everywhere August 9.

This Colombian Has Made History As He Becomes The First Latino To Win The Tour De France And The World Is So Proud

Entertainment

This Colombian Has Made History As He Becomes The First Latino To Win The Tour De France And The World Is So Proud

Marca Claro Colombia / Twitter

The Tour de France is the biking world’s biggest event. It’s basically cycling’s Copa Mundial, it’s huge. So the fact that a Colombian is totally owning this championship race is a major deal and Latinos around the world, but especially Colombians, are celebrating extra fuerte because this year a Colombian is set to win cycling’s biggest race. 

Egan Bernal is making history as the first Latino to win the Tour de France and we stan.

Credit: @CNN / Twitter

Egan Bernal, a 22-year-old from Colombia, is set to be crowned the winner of this year’s Tour de France. Not only will be the first Latino and first Colombian to win the race but he’ll also be the youngest winner since 1909 – yes, 110 years ago.

This is amazing. 

Obviously, all of Colombia is supporting his victory over hundreds of other riders. Bernal’s victory has seemed to come pretty easy to him. He’s sailed through the competition leading most of the race segments. And since the Tour de France winner is selected based upon their overall times per race segment, Bernal is all but guaranteed to win.

“We still have to make it to Paris,” Bernal told reporters covering the Tour. “I can’t understand what’s happening. I will need a few days — it’s incredible. It’ll take a few days to realize what I have achieved,” he continued. “To be honest, I was feeling good today. I kept thinking 5km, 4km, 3km. One less, one less to go, each time.“

If there is any surprise at Bernal’s win, it is that it has taken so long for a Colombian to top the podium and he could now dominate for years to come.

But this year has scene the rise of many Colombians. This year alone, three of them – Rigoberto Uran, Nairo Quintana, and Bernal – finished within the top 10.

And yea, it’s true, Bernal isn’t only the first Colombian to win he race he’s also the first Latino.

Credit: @BruceCarlson75 / Twitter

Mr Bernal’s journey from a humble upbringing has become a symbol in Colombia, a country that has produced many famed cyclists.

He’s shattering records – he’ll also be the youngest winner, at 22, since 1909!

Credit: @BBCSport / Twitter

Yup, not in 110 years has someone as young as Bernal won the Tour de France. And not only that, Bernal is the third youngest winner in the race’s 116 year history.

Like many young Latinos, Bernal almost entered the world of futbol.

Credit: @KissMyArsenal / Twitter

But apparently, Bernal wasn’t a fan of the sport. He dropped it shortly after starting it and took up cycling instead.

Colombia is a well-known cycling country with many champions competing in tournaments around the world. However, none has ever risen to the level of success that Bernal will have achieved after winning the Tour de France.

For both young and old, emotions were running high in Bernal’s hometown of Zipaquira.

Credit: @AFP_Sport / Twitter

In his hometown of Zipaquira, hundreds came to the “Plaza of Hope” to watch the final stage of the Tour in Paris, beamed across a giant screen. A graffiti mural of the champion was unveiled in the town over a week ago.

Bernal’s victory has resonated especially with Colombians from modest backgrounds, many of whom are from the same deprived, largely indigenous areas of Colombia’s Andes mountains.

Basically all the Colombians in France, and probably from Colombia too, came out to celebrate on the streets of Paris.

One Twitter user pointed out that they didn’t even think there were any Colombians left in Colombia because they all seemed to have arrived in Paris to celebrate the exact moment that Bernal crosses that finish line.

Bernal also seemed to be getting in on the celebrations.

Credit: @PimientoFutbol / Twitter

Can’t say we blame him. Aside from the adrenaline and pride that comes from his accomplishment, it’s also been extremely hot in France. As the Tour de France has been taking place, record temperatures have been taking place all over the country – including in Paris where the city reached its all time high temperature on Friday of 108º F.

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