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Meeting Notes From The Very Official Meeting Of Latinx, Emmy Edition

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The Very Official Meeting Of Latinx

September 19th, 2016

First point of discussion: Emmys, The

Transcript:

Alright, find your seats. There’s plenty of Malta and Jupiña for later.

OK, so the Emmys. What the fuck, guys? Like, what the actual fuck.

We’re all tired, I know, of feeling like we’re the only ones who discuss Latinx representation, and the lack thereof, in Hollywood and across media in general. We’ve been bringing it up since our meetings in… let me see here… 1932, before we were even calling out gathering The Very Official Meetings of Latinx.

So let’s change tactics. Let’s create an actual, actionable plan on how to tackle this shit.

Search & employ.

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Credit: via PopKey

It’s not enough for everyone, from an executive to a casting director, to simply say “we couldn’t find” Latinx. You’re not looking hard enough, then. Look harder. Ask around. Make the effort. Look at how SNL hired Latinx talent (both in front of and behind the camera) from within Broadway Video’s Latinx-focused site, Más Mejor.

Pass the mic.

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Credit: ABC

Of course, it’s not enough to simply have Latinx around (this is the difference between diversity and inclusion.) Don’t leave it to non-Latinx to speak on behalf of Latinx when there’s the opportunity to pass the mic along to people who can speak genuinely about their own experiences, from the writers’ room outward.

Hold the door open.

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Credit: NBC

It is truly up to Latinx to champion their fellow Latinx. Time has proven that we can’t rely on others to do it for us. Leave the door open behind you so that others may enter.

Take a two-prong approach to representation.

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Credit: Hulu

It is important to hire and cast Latinx to tell specifically Latinx stories (like “East Los High“), as well as to allow Latinx to simply exist as people within the worlds created in television and movies (like Santiago and Rosa in “Brooklyn Nine-Nine“).

Vote with your money.

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Credit: VEVO

Latinx over-index pretty much across the board when it comes to media consumption. Which means we’re spending a ton of money on this stuff. Which means we’re paying for content that continues to represent us 1) barely and 2) stereotypically. Think about the projects and ideas you want to fund with your hard-earned cash, both when it comes to Hollywood blockbusters and crowd-sourced indie projects.


These are by no means mandates or the only means we have of making a difference, but it’s a start. And with that, this meeting is adjourned. Please meet us for hot dogs on white bread out on the patio. Thank you.


READ: Where Are The Latina Directors?

Sandra Cisneros Was Given One Of The Highest Honors You Can Give An Artist

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Sandra Cisneros Was Given One Of The Highest Honors You Can Give An Artist

Credit: KnopfGroup/YouTube

Her inspiration was the lack of Latino representation in the arts.

Last week, Chicana author Sandra Cisneros was named as one of the recipients for this year’s National Medal of Arts, one of the highest awards an artist, writer and/or musician can get. The author of “The House On Mango Street,” one of the most significant words of Latino literature, was chosen by President barack Obama for “explor[ing] issues of race, class and gender through the lives of ordinary people straddling multiple cultures.”  Cisneros was one of three Latinos who received the honorable distinction; accordionist and conjunto god Santiago Jimenez, Jr. (brother of Flaco Jimenez), and Chicano playwright/writer/director Luis Valdez were also honored by President Obama.

To celebrate the author of “The House Of Mango Street,” required reading in pretty much every middle school or high school, here’s a video of Cisneros talking about why she wrote the book in the first place. In short, while at the prestigious Iowa Writers’ Workshop, Cisneros became painfully aware that stories like hers — and ours — were not being told.


READ: Mexico’s “Creepiest” Director Gets His Own Exhibit At LACMA

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