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Meeting Notes From The Very Official Meeting Of Latinx, Emmy Edition

The Very Official Meeting Of Latinx

September 19th, 2016

First point of discussion: Emmys, The

Transcript:

Alright, find your seats. There’s plenty of Malta and Jupiña for later.

OK, so the Emmys. What the fuck, guys? Like, what the actual fuck.

We’re all tired, I know, of feeling like we’re the only ones who discuss Latinx representation, and the lack thereof, in Hollywood and across media in general. We’ve been bringing it up since our meetings in… let me see here… 1932, before we were even calling out gathering The Very Official Meetings of Latinx.

So let’s change tactics. Let’s create an actual, actionable plan on how to tackle this shit.

Search & employ.

Credit: via PopKey

It’s not enough for everyone, from an executive to a casting director, to simply say “we couldn’t find” Latinx. You’re not looking hard enough, then. Look harder. Ask around. Make the effort. Look at how SNL hired Latinx talent (both in front of and behind the camera) from within Broadway Video’s Latinx-focused site, Más Mejor.

Pass the mic.

Credit: ABC

Of course, it’s not enough to simply have Latinx around (this is the difference between diversity and inclusion.) Don’t leave it to non-Latinx to speak on behalf of Latinx when there’s the opportunity to pass the mic along to people who can speak genuinely about their own experiences, from the writers’ room outward.

Hold the door open.

Credit: NBC

It is truly up to Latinx to champion their fellow Latinx. Time has proven that we can’t rely on others to do it for us. Leave the door open behind you so that others may enter.

Take a two-prong approach to representation.

Credit: Hulu

It is important to hire and cast Latinx to tell specifically Latinx stories (like “East Los High“), as well as to allow Latinx to simply exist as people within the worlds created in television and movies (like Santiago and Rosa in “Brooklyn Nine-Nine“).

Vote with your money.

Credit: VEVO

Latinx over-index pretty much across the board when it comes to media consumption. Which means we’re spending a ton of money on this stuff. Which means we’re paying for content that continues to represent us 1) barely and 2) stereotypically. Think about the projects and ideas you want to fund with your hard-earned cash, both when it comes to Hollywood blockbusters and crowd-sourced indie projects.


These are by no means mandates or the only means we have of making a difference, but it’s a start. And with that, this meeting is adjourned. Please meet us for hot dogs on white bread out on the patio. Thank you.


READ: Where Are The Latina Directors?

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Cuban Gossip Blogger Perez Hilton Made A Living By Being Mean But Now He’s Trying To Change

Entertainment

Cuban Gossip Blogger Perez Hilton Made A Living By Being Mean But Now He’s Trying To Change

Recently, there has been quite the reckoning over how the media and society treat celebrities and influencers. Perez Hilton was one of the leading influencers when it came to haunting young famous women and LA ‘It Girls’ thanks to his up-to-the-minute celebrity gossip blog. 

Whether he was detailing their very public spirals out of control or drawing cartoon penises on their photos, Perez Hilton was there to capitalize on everyone else’s drama. Now the father of three says that he’s sorry for his past cruelty and is working to remake the world of celebrity gossip.

Hilton has apologized for his years of cruelty but does he deserve forgiveness?

For several years in the mid-aughts, Perez Hilton, whose real name is Mario Lavandeira Jr., was the most talked-about celebrity blogger in the world. And although his readership has taken a severe dive, his posts frequently pop up and remind the public that he was once the Queen of Mean. 

“I’ve apologized countless times,” Hilton, who lives in Los Angeles with his mother and three children, told Buzzfeed News. “A lot of what I did during that time was reprehensible and toxic. But that wasn’t everything. I wasn’t just nasty and mean and cruel and hurtful. I was also positive and supportive.”

But Hilton admits that he knew even at the time that what he was writing and what he was putting out into the universe was wrong. “Attention was my drug. A drug addict, in the moment, knows what they’re doing is wrong. Most of them wish they weren’t using, but they’re doing it anyway,” he tells Buzzfeed News.

Through all the writing and posts, Hilton has a lot to be sorry for.

One of his actions that gets him the most criticism is his obsession with outing famous men, including Lance Bass, Neil Patrick Harris, and Dustin Lance Black. “Two years before I came out, I was really bullied on the internet by bloggers, that’s when Perez Hilton just started and was just really malicious against me,” Bass said in 2007

Thanks to these cruel posts, Hilton would often face criticism from The Advocate and AfterEllen.com

Despite his efforts, his cruel reputation continues to follow him. 

Regardless of his mea culpas and attempts to reform both himself and the content on his site, his mean-spirited reputation has always followed him. That was made all the more clearer following the release of Framing Britney Spears.

The film really focused on her relationship with the press and paparazzi which was always waiting for her to slip up and get it on camera. Although Hilton wasn’t mentioned in the film, his old posts about Spears began resurfacing on Twitter. One, titled “Britney’s Breakdown,” ends with, “Take her children away!!!!!!” repeated five times in bold. 
Thanks to the explosion of social media apps and everyone having a camera at their fingertips thanks to smartphones, the celebrity gossip industry has changed a lot. Now, it’s impossible for a gossip blogger’s work to go unchecked. And now, most people even consume their by-the-minute celebrity updates on Instagram accounts like deuxmoi and The Shade Room.

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Interracial Couples Are Officially Getting Emoji Representation

Things That Matter

Interracial Couples Are Officially Getting Emoji Representation

Representation matters.

When it comes to interracial couples, this is certainly true. In 2017, The New York Times posed the question “where are all of the racial couples?” in an article about the representation of mixed-race couples on screen. The pieces pointed out that for many years, the entertainment industry “forbid depictions of interracial relationships. From 1930 until the late 1960s, the Motion Picture Production Code banned ‘vulgarity and suggestiveness’ so that ‘good taste may be emphasized.'” The piece put a bold underline under the fact that decades have passed since these codes were dismantled. In fact, the same year of the article’s release, the Pew Research Center revealed that the number rose to 10 percent, including 11 million interracial marriages in total.

These statistics oddly haven’t always extended to even our most innovative forms: texting to name just one. Up until recently, texters weren’t able to express their mix-raced love via iPhones.

Now thanks to a new update, they are!

New updates to Apple‘s iOS 14.5 are bringing interracial couples to your texts this Spring.

New couple emojis with skin variant combinations.nbsp
Emojipedia

Apple is working to make our texting experience more inclusive and representative for all phone users. In a recent update from Unicode, the system that produces emojis, Apple has announced that they will be unveiling new designs and new options for emojis that already exist as part of iOS 14.5.

New designs for the emojis will be more representative of people with disabilities as well.

Emojipedia

They include a person with a bird, flaming heart emoji, a healed heart, and new skin tone variants for kissing couples and couples with heart emojis. There will also be accessibility-themed emojis which include an ear with a hearing aid, a guide dog, a prosthetic leg, and a prosthetic arm.

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