Entertainment

Meeting Notes From The Very Official Meeting Of Latinx, Emmy Edition

The Very Official Meeting Of Latinx

September 19th, 2016

First point of discussion: Emmys, The

Transcript:

Alright, find your seats. There’s plenty of Malta and Jupiña for later.

OK, so the Emmys. What the fuck, guys? Like, what the actual fuck.

We’re all tired, I know, of feeling like we’re the only ones who discuss Latinx representation, and the lack thereof, in Hollywood and across media in general. We’ve been bringing it up since our meetings in… let me see here… 1932, before we were even calling out gathering The Very Official Meetings of Latinx.

So let’s change tactics. Let’s create an actual, actionable plan on how to tackle this shit.

Search & employ.

tumblr_inline_n5bxokjxg81soma0j
Credit: via PopKey

It’s not enough for everyone, from an executive to a casting director, to simply say “we couldn’t find” Latinx. You’re not looking hard enough, then. Look harder. Ask around. Make the effort. Look at how SNL hired Latinx talent (both in front of and behind the camera) from within Broadway Video’s Latinx-focused site, Más Mejor.

Pass the mic.

tumblr_no91mljxoa1uvprlro2_500
Credit: ABC

Of course, it’s not enough to simply have Latinx around (this is the difference between diversity and inclusion.) Don’t leave it to non-Latinx to speak on behalf of Latinx when there’s the opportunity to pass the mic along to people who can speak genuinely about their own experiences, from the writers’ room outward.

Hold the door open.

8e4d1410-fc34-0132-f416-0e18518aac2f
Credit: NBC

It is truly up to Latinx to champion their fellow Latinx. Time has proven that we can’t rely on others to do it for us. Leave the door open behind you so that others may enter.

Take a two-prong approach to representation.

tumblr_n8vr0c60af1s942oho3_500
Credit: Hulu

It is important to hire and cast Latinx to tell specifically Latinx stories (like “East Los High“), as well as to allow Latinx to simply exist as people within the worlds created in television and movies (like Santiago and Rosa in “Brooklyn Nine-Nine“).

Vote with your money.

giphy
Credit: VEVO

Latinx over-index pretty much across the board when it comes to media consumption. Which means we’re spending a ton of money on this stuff. Which means we’re paying for content that continues to represent us 1) barely and 2) stereotypically. Think about the projects and ideas you want to fund with your hard-earned cash, both when it comes to Hollywood blockbusters and crowd-sourced indie projects.


These are by no means mandates or the only means we have of making a difference, but it’s a start. And with that, this meeting is adjourned. Please meet us for hot dogs on white bread out on the patio. Thank you.


READ: Where Are The Latina Directors?

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

We Have a Conversation With Bachelorette Clare Crawley About Diversity, Her Identity, and Her Status As the First Latina Lead: ‘I Embrace It’

Entertainment

We Have a Conversation With Bachelorette Clare Crawley About Diversity, Her Identity, and Her Status As the First Latina Lead: ‘I Embrace It’

Photo: ABC/Maarten de Boer

When Clare Crawley was announced in March as the newest “Bachelorette” for the popular reality TV series, the media wanted to focus on one thing and one thing only: her age. At 39-years-old, Crawley is the show’s oldest Bachelorette to date. And the network doesn’t want you to forget it. 

Promo materials included Crawley posing as Mrs. Robinson from “The Graduate”. The tagline was “It’s about time” (Because she’s waited so long…get it? Yeah, neither do we). The resounding narrative was that, because of her age, this is her last chance at love. Which, for the record, is patently false.

Photo: ABC/Maarten de Boer

But coincidentally Crawley has another, much more exciting “first” under her belt: born to an American father and a Mexican mother, Clare Crawley is the franchise’s first Latina Bachelorette.

In an exclusive interview with Mitú, Crawley told us that her status as the first Latina Bachelorette is a happy accident. “That’s not something that was ever really brought up to me or ever even made a point,” she said of her casting. But it is a coincidence that she fully embraces. “I would gladly take the Latina Bachelorette!” she said, laughing. “That’s way better than saying I’m the oldest Bachelorette!”

Crawley knows that her fair-haired, light-skinned appearance might confuse some viewers about her heritage. When asked if she ever struggled with her identity (as many children of mixed-race parents have reported), Crawley said she never had that problem. “No, no, no. I embraced it. This is something that I’ve always talked about, it’s part of my everyday life.”

Crawley went on to describe the customs and traditions she experiences as a woman of Mexican descent. “My mom speaks Spanish all the time and lots of foods we ate growing up [were Mexican]. It was definitely something in my life throughout.”

Photo: clarecrawley/Instagram

She then lovingly described her favorite (and familiar) Mexican tradition: making tamales with her (five!) older sisters during Christmastime. “And when I say we make tamales, I mean, we literally make like 12 dozen of them. So, we make them for all our friends, everyone wants them.”

Although Clare grew up in a mixed-race household, she explained that she was largely unaware of the challenges her mother faced as a Mexican woman trying to make a life for herself in conservative Georgia.

“Back in the day, just because [my mother’s] skin was darker, people [in Georgia] didn’t talk to her. People didn’t want to hang out with her. It was really hard for her,” Crawley told Mitú. “It was something I didn’t realize affected her…Because when you think of racism or that kind of stuff, it’s not just towards one race.” Crawley’s family ended up moving to Sacramento–a community that proved to be more accepting of her mother’s heritage.

Photo: ABC/Craig Sjodin

Crawley, for her part, knows that when many people think of a “typical” Latina woman, the image of her isn’t the first one that comes to mind. But as we know, there is no such thing as a “typical” Latina.

“[People] look at my skin color, they look at my hair color, or eye color, and automatically just say: ‘Oh, this white girl’. And they’ll make jokes and they’ll make off-handed things like that, but they have no idea. And I speak up, and I say it, and I defend it because it’s definitely something I’m proud of.”

And to the critics that say she’s “not Latina enough” because of the way she looks, she pays them no mind. “I think that’s their problem, not mine,” she says. “Because there’s no denying what my genetics and my DNA are. So if people have a problem with it or challenge it or question it, I think it’s just ignorant.”

Photo: ABC/Craig Sjodin

As for “The Bachelor” franchise and their push for more diversity (they finally casted their first Black “Bachelor”), Clare is hopeful. “I want people to be aware, more and more, that it’s 2020 and here moving forward…embrace diversity. Because everybody, every age, every shape, everything you can imagine, people in general are worthy of love.”

And as for the future Bachelorette (which if rumors are to be believed, will come sooner rather than later), Crawley has this piece of advice for her: “Follow your gut.”

“At the end of the day, you need to do what’s best for yourself,” she explained to Mitú. “Because you’re the one you have to go to bed with at night. Your conscience, your heart is the one that you have to live with…You have to live your life in a way that honors yourself. So, stand by that and you won’t regret it.”

You can catch “The Bachelorette” every Tuesday on ABC at 8p.m.

*This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

The Teaser Is Out For Season 3 Of Cobra Kai And OMG I Want To Take Karate Lessons

Entertainment

The Teaser Is Out For Season 3 Of Cobra Kai And OMG I Want To Take Karate Lessons

Netflix / YouTube

Netflix’s “Cobra Kai” is continuing the epic story of Daniel LaRusso and Johnny Lawrence. The story now follows the two men as they train the fighters in their own dojos. The Netflix original series is coming back to for season 3 and, honestly, thank you, Netflix.

“Cobra Kai” season 3 is coming soon to Netflix soon and it’s about time.

Season 2 left us with a serious cliff hanger. A melee fight broke out at the high school between Cobra Kai and Miyagi Do. The fight, which was started by Samantha LaRusso and Tory Schwarber, took a shocking turn when Miguel Diaz gets knocked over a railing and falls to onto a staircase. Miguel fell onto the staircase below after being kicked by Robby Keene. Everyone was stunned when they saw Miguel fall and Robby immediately regretted his involvement.

Season 3 of “Cobra Kai” is coming to Netflix Jan. 8, 2021 and they are already renewed for a fourth season.

There is so much excitement around a new season of “Cobra Kai.” The show is bridging a generational gap between people who grew up with “Karate Kid” and those just discovering it through the Netflix show. “Karate Kid” spawned multiple sequels and made karate super cool, obvi. The latest iteration of the franchise puts a Latino, Miguel, in the main spotlight.

Young Latinos are loving the representation they get from Miguel as a main character.

There are issues with Miguel throughout the show that makes for frustrating moments. However, he is a teenager and we all know what it is like to be a teenager and just not get things. He is led by his emotions and, in classic movie teenage angst, finds himself becoming deeply committed to something to release his emotional frustrations.

Also, it continues to push the narrative that representation matters because it does.

It cannot be stressed enough how much people are loving this show.

“Cobra Kai” was a major show when it was first streaming. The Nielsen rating showed that “Cobra Kai” was second in the numbers of streams after its Netflix debut. The show began on YouTube Red (now YouTube Premium) but moved to Netflix because YouTube changed their strategy. The video-sharing platform is focusing more on content producers and less on creating scripted shows.

The move to Netflix brought the show to the forefront of entertainment as it hit number 1 for the streaming giant.

Binge watching television is what most people are doing as we sit in isolation in our apartments and homes. That kind of prolonged isolation has given people a chance to reconnect with their streaming options and dive into the content that is out there.

This show might be creating a new generation of karate enthusiasts.

If you’ve seen “Cobra Kai” then you know how exciting the idea of karate can be. Maybe the show being on Netflix will bring renewed interest to the sport. Who doesn’t want to be part of a dojo with other fighters who are ready to have you back?

READ: Netflix Finally Gave Us The Release Date For “Selena: The Series” And Fans Can’t Wait

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com