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24 Years After Selena’s Death: This Is What Los Dinos Have Been Up To

Credit: ill-ary / Tumblr

We all know that Selena wasn’t a solo act. She was backed up by a badass band we know as Los Dinos. Although the band continued playing after her death, they never really recovered from the tragic loss (same) and disbanded in 2002. Since then, the members have gone their own way. Here’s what they’ve been up to lately…

Los Dinos

CREDIT: @SUZETTESYLD / INSTAGRAM

This is what Selena y Los Dinos looked like… and we remember them like it was just yesterday ?.

Mr. and Mrs. Quintanilla

CREDIT: @SUZETTESYLD / INSTAGRAM

After Selena’s death, Abraham Quintanilla Jr., who started and then managed Selena y Los Dinos, has been dedicated to protecting his daughter’s legacy. He’s been involved in anything that has Selena’s name, including documentaries, albums, movies, fashion lines – even the Selena museum. He and his wife, Marcella, also founded The Selena Foundation, which helps kids in crisis.

A.B. Quintanilla – Bass

CREDIT: @selenareinadeltexmex/ INSTAGRAM

Don’t act like you don’t remember the song “Chiquilla” and yelling out “Te quiero!” Well, two years after his sister’s death, A.B. Quintanilla resurfaced with his own group, Kumbia Kings, a blend of cumbia, pop and R&B. After drama with his bandmate, Cruz Martinez, A.B. left the group and launched Kumbia All Starz in 2006.

Suzette Quintanilla – Drums

CREDIT: @SUZETTESYLD / INSTAGRAM

Suzette Quintanilla halted her music career after her sister’s death in 1995. Now she’s the manager of Selena’s museum in Corpus Christi, Texas, and the family’s music production company, Q-Productions. They sign groups that play Tejano music, similar to Los Dinos.

Chris Perez – Guitars

CREDIT: @CHRISPEREZ1 / INSTAGRAM

Chris Perez, Selena’s widower, formed his own music group, The Chris Perez Band, in 1998. That year, he married Vanessa Villanueva and later had two children. Although his band was rather successful, they disbanded in 2002. After his divorce from Vanessa, he formed another band in 2010 called the Chris Perez Project, but with little success. In 2012, he wrote the book “To Selena, With Love” without the permission of the Quintanilla family(!), which included personal photos and love letters between the two. Don’t worry, the family later approved the book’s publication.

Pete Astudillo – Backup Vocals

CREDIT: @pete_astudillo / Instagram

Pete Astudillo, who co-wrote some of Selena’s most popular songs like “Bidi Bidi Bom Bom,” and rocked that iconic mullet, went on to have a lot of success. He released five albums on his own, the last one in 1999. Aside from participating in Selena’s 2005 tribute concert, he has not released any other music.

Ricky Vela – Keyboards / Songwriter

CREDIT: @STILLDREAMINGOFYOU / INSTAGRAM

Ricky Vela (right of Suzette) was also co-brains behind a lot of Selena’s most popular songs, like “La Llamada,” “Fotos y Recuerdos,” and “El Chico Del Apartamento 512.” He continued writing music after Selena died, but slowed down after 1999.

Joe Ojeda – Keyboards

Credit: @souls5cinco / Instagram

Joe Ojeda continued composing music after Selena’s death. He wrote songs for Veronica Castro, Jennifer y Los Jetz, Pete Astudillo and Chris Perez. He, too, slowed down around 2010. 

READ: Fashion Crimes That Are Totally Okay IF You’re In Selena’s Band

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Sotomayor: Greatest Obstacle Is Fear, Not Discrimination

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Sotomayor: Greatest Obstacle Is Fear, Not Discrimination

sotomayor
CREDIT: @LG_LAURAGOMEZ / INSTAGRAM

When Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor set out to write her book “My Beloved World,” she was inspired by a question a journalist asked and that she later asked herself: “Do I really think I had a happy childhood?”

Before Sonia Sotomayor became the first Latina to join the Supreme Court, before going to Yale for law school and Princeton for undergrad, she was a young Puerto Rican girl living in South Bronx struggling to get by.

While growing up in South Bronx, Sotomayor lived with an alcoholic dad and a mom who was emotionally distant. They fought about money, the housework, the drinking and even Sotomayor’s insulin shots when she was diagnosed with diabetes.

It wasn’t as happy a childhood as others had perceived, but what was true about her younger self, was that she worked hard even when she was afraid. Even with all the success in her life, she fought fear all her life. And that, ultimately, is the message of her book.

“If I’ve accomplished anything in my book… [it’s] that people will understand the greatest obstacle they will face in life is not discrimination, it’s their own fear,” she told NPR. “Fear often paralyzes us because what kills you and what stops you is not experiencing new things.”

She encourages young Latinos to experience life even with fear. “I can’t tell you how many Latino kids I still talk to who tell me, ‘I don’t want to go away to go college because I don’t want to leave my family,’” she said. “You don’t leave your family by going away to college for god’s sakes! You enrich your life and theirs by doing something they couldn’t do and bringing back the joy home.”

So for any young Latino out there deciding whether to go away to college or not, take the advice of one of the most powerful Latinas in the United States: You’ll be fine.

Sotomayor has a lot more to say. Get inspired with her interview here

READ: 5 Latino Figures We Wish “Hamilton” Creator Lin-Manuel Miranda Would Write Musicals For

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