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6 Myths Latinas Can’t Live Down Thanks to Stereotypes on TV

Latina roles in the media haven’t changed since… well, since there were roles for Latinas in the media. Although Latinas are more than deserving of their time on TV, these roles have perpetuated the stereotypes and stigma for the entire Latina population.

The roles that portray us as exotic, hypersexual, voluptuous, ultra-feminine, spanish-speaking or submissive run rampant in the media — think the likes of Sofía Vergara, Roselyn Sanchez and Lupe Ontiveros — and are similar to how Latinas are perceived in real life.

READ: How Telenovelas Lied to Us About Sex

In her article “6 Harmful Myths About Sex and Latinas,” poet and writer Erika Sanchez says the affects go further than that, “Unfortunately, this pigeon-hole doesn’t only affect the way others perceive us, it also influences the way we view ourselves. Even knowing that these portrayals are ridiculous, some of us may also fall into the trap. The media is that powerful.”

And those established roles leave no room for roles about real Latinas, especially from the LGBT community.

Read more about these long-standing myths from Salon here.

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9 LGBTQ+ Latinas Making The World A Better Place Through Representation

Culture

9 LGBTQ+ Latinas Making The World A Better Place Through Representation

Women are a driving force for change. It has been proven time and time again in history. LGBTQ+ Latinas are part of this tradition whether it is in activism, media, or representation in comic books. Here are 9 LGBTQ+ Latinas who are doing their part to make the world a better place.

Stephanie Beatriz

Stephanie Beatriz is known for her character Rosa on “Brooklyn Nine-Nine.” The actress wanted to create a character that someone like her could relate to and she made it happen. Rosa came out in the show as a bisexual Latina and it gave Beatriz a chance to play a character that reflects her real identity. For the first time, bisexual Latinas have someone on television that speaks to a very real and important identity.

Tessa Thompson

Tessa Thompson publicly came out of the closet as bisexual in 2018. The actress revealed her relationship with musician Janelle Monáe and fans were there to support her. Thompson made a real splash in the Marvel Cinematic Universe when she portrayed Valkyrie in “Thor: Ragnarok.” She will be slaying again as Valkrie in “Thor: Love and Thunder.”

Bamby Salcedo

Bamby Salcedo is unapologetically trans and fighting for trans lives and rights. Salcedo founded the TransLatin@ Coalition to create a network for trans Latinas to connect and help each other thrive. Salcedo is often in protests for trans lives including against Pete Buttigieg during a CNN/HRC Town Hall.

Victoria Cruz

Victoria Cruz is a gatekeeper of LGBTQ+ history. The indigenous trans woman was there for the start of the Gay Liberation movement in 1969. Cruz has been a leader in the fight for LGBTQ+ rights. Cruz has continued to her fight for trans rights even in the face of transphobia in the LGBTQ+ community. As the LGBTQ+ community tends for forget its history, Cruz is here to remind them of how important the trans community is in gaing LGBTQ+ rights.

Carmen Carrera

Carmen Carrera first came into everyone’s home as a contestant on “RuPaul’s Drag Race.” This was before she started her transition. Since embarking on her transition journey, Carrera has had a very successful career as a supermodel, became a stepmother, and has been championing trans rights in the U.S. and Peru. The activist has spent years breaking down stereotypes about trans people wherever she goes.

Salice Rose

Salice Rose is a major name in social media. With more than 16 million followers on TikTok, Rose has created a place for people to feel safe and included. Using comedy and her spirituality, Rose has been able to tackle important issues, like coming out.

Gabby Rivera

Gabby Rivera was tapped to write for the America Chavez comic book in a move by Marvel that was widely celebrated. Rivera was able to give American Chavez, a queer Latin superhero, an authentic voice. Rivera is also the author of “Juliet Takes A Breaths.’ The young adult novel follows a Puerto Rican girl who comes out to her family right before going to an internship on the other side of the country.

Martine Gutierrez

Martine Gutierrez is a famed photographer and artist that has displayed work around the world. The art critic Barbara Calderon wrote about Gutierrez’s identity that has been an elusive yet broad identity. Calderon spoke of terms used to identify oneself yet none seemed to accurately describe who Gutierrez is.

Lido Pimienta

Lido Pimienta is an Afro-indigenous Colombian Canadian musician who is transforming Latin music, especially the scene with her sexuality. The queer musician is unapologetic about her identity for the sake of visibility. Pimienta feels a need to stay ver visible to change the long-running history of no queer visibility in media.

READ: Here Are Some Queer Films And Shows To Watch To Start Pride Off Right

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Agencies Are Receiving A Shocking Amount Of Requests For Surrogates Who Won’t Get The COVID Vaccine

Fierce

Agencies Are Receiving A Shocking Amount Of Requests For Surrogates Who Won’t Get The COVID Vaccine

With the availability of coronavirus vaccines growing across the United States, want-to-be parents are searching for surrogates who have yet to recieve the COVID-19 vaccine. One of their bigger requests? They also want women who are willing to stay unvaccinated until they carry the parents’ children to term.

Surrogacy agencies are currently working to match vaccine-averse prospective parents with surrogates who are willing to stay unvaccinated. 

According to VICE, “for those with pregnancies already underway, the decision about whether to vaccinate is forcing surrogates and would-be parents into tough conversations. Pregnant people face higher risks of severe illness if they catch COVID-19—which could lead them to give birth too early.”

Recently, an agency based in California called Surrogate First, reported that nearly a quarter of their patrons have requested an unvaccinated surrogate. The report highlights that

“We had intended parents who did not want her [the surrogate] to have the vaccination, were worried about COVID, and they actually paid for her lost wages to not work the last three months” of her pregnancy, Mareko said. “It gave peace of mind to them and it allowed the surrogate not to have any type of financial hardship.”

According to reports, eager parents and surrogates have struggled to be on the same page about vaccines and safety since the pandemic.

“Intended parents already feel a lack of control over this pregnancy since they’re not physically carrying themselves,” Gayle Garrett, Surrogate Solutions’ founder told Vice. “They’re trusting another person to carry this pregnancy, and at the same time, they’re trusting someone else that she will adhere to the [COVID-19] guidelines.”

As of today, the nation’s top infectious disease expert, revealed that over 10,000 pregnant women have been vaccinated in the United States. In early February, Dr. Anthony Fauci underlined that there have been zero “red flags” when it comes to pregnancy and vaccines. Animal testing of mRNA vaccines, such as the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines, found zero impact on fertility or pregnancies.

Pfizer recently also announced that they would initiate another round of trials that would include 4,000 pregnant women.

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