Culture

Las Mañanitas is the Most Majestic Celebration We Went to As Kids

If you’re Mexican and/or Catholic, you remember all of this…

Waking up super early…like 5 a.m. early.

Credit: @sunnydsj / Twitter

We dressed up in bright colors.

Credit: @killa_cristal / Twitter

And the little ones arrived to the party in beautiful embroidered pieces.

Credit: @chrissss8 / Instagram

Some tried to get away with showing up in their PJs. Not happenin.

Credit: @omarcollin / Twitter

The setup was fit for a queen.

Credit: @iibarra91 / Instagram

As they say, a beauty clothed by the sun and crowned by the stars.

Credit: @tvnewkathy / Twitter

There were always roses on roses on roses.

Credit: @itsrob9 / Instagram

Every girl’s dream ?????.

The highlight was probably watching her get serenaded by beautiful mariachi music.

Credit: @edgarm91 / Instagram

So much passion.

And who can forget the Aztec dancers and the smell of incense that filled the church?

Credit: @iter_ursus / Instagram

This was probably the only time you saw them perform.

So beautiful.

#ultimoazteca #danza #danzaazteca #matachines #basilicadeguadalupe #virgendeguadalupe #12dediciembre #tradicionesmexicanas #cocheros #penachos

A photo posted by Danza Azteca Itzcuauhtli (@danzaaztecaitzcuauhtli) on

Credit: @danzaaztecaitzucauhtli / Instagram

Some also sang to La Morenita from home with their private mariachis…

MANANITAS PARA LA VIRJEN DE GUADALUPE #VIRJENDEGUADALUPE #VIRJENSITA #12DEDICIEMBRE #LASMANANITAS

A video posted by JOSE MELENDEZ (@_indo_official) on

Credit: @el_indio_oficial / Instagram

Or grupos norteños.

Credit: @jr_667_ / Instagram

It’s not a party without food. Pan dulce y chocolate caliente were always served after misa.

Credit: @bellerx / Instagram

Heaven ?.

All for the queen ??✨.

Credit: @mozzzerie_dean13 / Instagram

What was your favorite part of Las Mañanitas? Let us know in the comments below and don’t forget to click the share button!

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Latinos Shared The Most Messed Up Thing They’ve Ever Done To A Sibling And Y’all Are Cruel

Culture

Latinos Shared The Most Messed Up Thing They’ve Ever Done To A Sibling And Y’all Are Cruel

Jesse / Youtube

We all know that no one knows how to get under our skin quite like our siblings. From the nasty verbal jabs to literal physical jabs, our siblings have gone all out in torturing, humiliating and traumatizing us. Of course, we love them forever, but the marks of their tricks have no doubt left physical and emotional scars.

We asked our audience on Instagram what the most messed up thing they’ve ever done to a sibling was and boy were the responses wild.

Check them out below!

Forging their adoption papers.

“Told my brother he was adopted and made some fake adoption paper work… got him good.”” br1ana21

Giving them the big chop

Yas and Hals / Youtube

“When I was about 12 my sister was 9, she had a bad habit of pulling my hair so one day when she was sleeping I decided to cut her hair.” veronicaortiz360

Dang if my sibling ever does this one to me

“When I was 12 and my brother was 13, I was SO mad that I thought about putting Nair in his hair soap, but I decided that that was too bad so instead I put clear hand soap on his toothbrush 😂” –thefaz3962

Better than the alternative…

Giving them their first scars

Pinterest.com

“Had a little ride-on car when we were little, which was my favorite. My brother liked to use it too much and ride around in it. So I offered to push him around in it (I was 5 and he was 1) but it ended up getting stuck on a crack on the sidewalk and it flipped over. He ended up getting a gash under his chin 😂 has the scar today.”- maria__clarisa

Everyone with this adoption joke…

“So many things… hit them with the vacuum cord, Made one think she was adopted and she believed it for years, you know older sibling stuff.” lillyesc

The ultimate blackmail

“When my brother was 17 and I 12, I found condoms and a thong in his room I blackmailed him for weeks until he snapped and told on himself 😂😂😂 I’m pretty sure I got in trouble for going through his stuff #dublestandard.” duhkarina

Using the Valentina on them

“My brother sleeps with his mouth open so I put some dog kibble in his mouth and then poured Valentina in with it brothers fell asleep so me and my Tia @nessasterk painted his toes, put make-up on him and sprayed perfume on his butt.”- morelia_real

Literally putting them on blast.

(@lungxinyi) | Twitter

“Put my sister @j0celyn09 in the dryer, turned it on for a few seconds and got a royal spanking but she liked it, lol.”- hi.dspnz26

And finally using the ultimate scary weapon against them.

“My brother @edlose_chaidez was bothering and teasing me so I told him to stop if not I would throw a fork at him. He didn’t stop and while he was running away I threw the fork I had at him and hit his arm. He still has a scar from it. Lol.”- yara_nely

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Some Mexicans Are Freaking Out Over This Drag Queen Who Dressed Up As La Virgencita To Make A Political Statement

Things That Matter

Some Mexicans Are Freaking Out Over This Drag Queen Who Dressed Up As La Virgencita To Make A Political Statement

Margaretyya / Instagram

La Virgen de Guadalupe is perhaps the most venerated figure in Mexico. Regardless of religious beliefs, la Guadalupana has become a cultural and national symbol, as it contrasts with the predominantly white images of saints and other religious figures (although if we talk about historical accuracy, chances are that Jesus and his disciples looked mostly Brown, as Middle-Eastern folk).

La Guadalupana is Brown-skinned and symbolizes the mixed-nature of Mexican mestizo culture. On one hand, the Guadalupana is derived from Catholicism, on the other it also echoes Aztec deities such as the goddess Tonantzin Coatlicue, which anthropologists believe the culture around La Virgen de Guadalupe echoes.

Truth is that Mexico is a country that venerates the Virgen de Guadalupe perhaps above all things, in particular each December 12, when millions of worshipers travel from all around the country to venerate her at the Basilica of Guadalupe, the place where Juan Diego, an indigenous man, claims to have encountered her. 

So it came as a shock to some that a drag queen from Mexico City dressed up as La Virgen de Guadalupe.

Credit: margaretyya/ Instagram

Her stage name is Margaret y Ya and she has caused controversy with this very artistic picture that reminds us of the work of Italian photographer Mario Testino. In the image, we can see Margaret y Ya posing with shopping bags.

In the photo shared on her Instagram, she writes an ironic caption: “Bendita seas Santa Virgencita Claus ????????✨ que nos llegaste a evangelizar con consumismo y materialismo estas épocas. ????❄️ ????” This roughly translates as: “Bless you Santa Virgencita Claus, you that brought consumerism and materialism to this time of the year”.

This is more a political and social commentary rather than a religious one, as December 12 has become the kick off of the end of year holidays and its many weeks of frantic shopping. The photo was taken by Mario Aragon and the composition highlights irony. Margaret y Ya told El Universal that her idea was to critique the ways in which religion often becomes a commodity. This is perhaps a slightly blunt way of doing it given Mexico’s sociocultural context, but hey, sometimes the only way of getting people’s attention is being over the top and fabulous. 

And as can be expected, some conservative minds (and many abuelitas, we are sure) pusieron el grito en el cielo, while others just chilled.

We mean, this photograph was meme-ready even from its inception, wasn’t it? So it came as no surprise that some in Twitter used it to expand on the “I’m gonna tell my kids this is…” meme universe!

But it is also clear that Margaret y ya had a very clear audience in mind.

Yes, she wanted to make men and boomers angry, which is exactly what she did! And isn’t art supposed to be provocative in order to make us think, really think about preconceived notions we might need to reconsider?

The question is tough but philosophically interesting: how much of religion is associated with buying and selling stuff? The image was part of Margaret y Ya’s 2018 calendar, but as it resurfaced it got more attention than ever before. 

And some dudes got really angry…

Credit: Valladolid Yucatan Pueblo Magico / Facebook

These two dudes are basically saying that no one messes with La Virgencita and that a sacred symbol should not be tainted. Man, take a chill pill. Comments on the original story at El Universal reveal a deep contrast between those users who yell blasphemy at the first chance, and those who can find a bit of nuance in artistic expression. 

But when it comes to Catholic countries such as Mexico, mixing popular culture and religion with art is prone to cause a lot of controversy. Madonna was almost banned from the country for the “Like a Prayer” video.

A Christ-like figure who was black! That was considered blasphemy at the time, as was the fact that Madonna looked at him lovingly. Seriously, this was a BFD a few decades ago, and for years las buenas costumbres in Mexico dictated that the singer was a persona non grata.

Other works of art, such as Martin Scorsese’s monumental film “The Last Temptation of Christ”, have also been banned and considered blasphemy, as they are interpretations of texts that are considered dogma (infallible truths), and as interpretations they might differ from what the Church says.

This is something similar to the mild scandal involving Margaret y Ya, as she took a longstanding symbol and used it to critique a capitalist way of living that perhaps takes those religiously inclined away from their faith. Although we suspect that in this case some old fashioned homophobia also came into the equation.

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