Entertainment

Record Labels Told Her No Because She Was ‘Too Latina’ So She Said Screw It And Created Her Own

LaLa Romero does it all. No, for real, she does. With every endeavor, LaLa takes it upon herself to build something, from the ground up.

This Chicana is an independent artist, soon-to-be founder of her own label, co-founder of her lifestyle brand Bella Doña, and a radio host for Apple’s Beats 1. But it didn’t come easy. When record labels told her there wasn’t a demographic for her music, she created a label herself. Streetwear brands weren’t catering to Latinas, so she and her business partner, Natalia Durazo, started one. “We weren’t in the forefront of the brands that existed, so we created our own,” she says.

mitú met up with LaLa for lunch at Escuela Taqueria in Los Angeles to see what the life of a real life boss looks like.

6:45 a.m. Daily


I’m forced out of bed by my bulldog, Biggie. He scratches at the side of my bed until I open my eyes and tell him good morning.

7:00 a.m.

?GOD BLESS?

A post shared by LaLa Romero?? (@lalaromero) on


I do a guided meditation first thing in the a.m. Being quiet and still is really hard for me, so meditating is a serious challenge. Usually, I start off good then move into daydreaming about what I want to eat and completely lose focus. I try to do this daily before I open my emails or social media because once I’m in work mode there’s really no turning back. This guided [routine] is one I do off YouTube; it has you run an inventory of all the things you’re grateful for. I think this is an important way to start your day. All of the most successful, extremely busy [people] I know meditate. I’m hoping I get the hang of it soon and zen my vibe.

7:30 a.m.

She was a smart girl, until she fell in love. ??? #NewMusicComingSoon

A post shared by LaLa Romero?? (@lalaromero) on


I journal daily. I have this Inner Guide planner my mentor gave me as a gift that has changed my life. She is the busiest woman in the music biz, anything she advises me to do, I’m on it. I update this journal every morning; it helps me sort my heart and work for the day.

8:00 a.m.


I walk Biggie to Starbucks and check all my emails. I’m basically juggling three different sectors of my career and brand, so I have to stay really organized or else all hell breaks loose and shit starts falling through the cracks. I spend around 20 minutes each morning in emails for each category: Music stuff with my manager, Beats 1 business with my producers, and Bella Doña with my business partner Natalia – which always turns into gossip sessions, since we are best friends, basically sisters.

9:00 a.m.

?

A post shared by LaLa Romero?? (@lalaromero) on


The gym is like my therapy. If I skip it, I’m grumpy all day. It sounds corny, but working out gives me a cool, natural high and keeps my anxiety issues at bay. I listen to my Beats 1 show talk breaks from the day before, then listen to Zane Lowe because his show is a roadmap for many things I’ll touch on during [the] request [segment]. I learn so much by listening to him broadcast.

10:30 a.m.

???

A post shared by LaLa Romero?? (@lalaromero) on


I grab more coffee and walk home. I walk instead of drive because it gives me time to listen to music and vibe in the sunshine. Nature, blooming roses, the fall leaves scattered on the ground all make me feel. I currently have Mac Miller’s new album “The Divine Feminine” in heavy rotation. I mostly get a lot of creative inspiration from heartbreak, so I’m always intrigued when people are in love and write about it’s upside.

10:40 a.m.


I check in and call our Bella Doña assistants. I break down daily objectives and put out any fires. We discuss customer service stuff, etc.

11:00 a.m.

Recent thrift find!! #22bucks

A post shared by LaLa Romero?? (@lalaromero) on


I get ready for my day! I don’t do full hair and makeup daily, so I can then move pretty quick.

12:00–3:30 p.m.


I work on Bella Doña early afternoons. I try to go into our office three times a week and take meetings outside the other two days. Designing, photo shoots, styling–all concepts, Natalia and I handle it all except shipping. On Fridays, which is the only day I’m not on air for Beats 1, we do photo shoots.

The brand mimics our life, taste and sense of humor. It’s really hard to pass the baton and hire people to do any of these jobs because no one gets us like us. One of our goals with the brand was to create opportunities for women from the neighborhood. Our office manager Karmen was the president of my MySpace street team back in the day. She did so much for me I vowed to hire her one day when I could afford to. It’s been dope to hire from within our community. Models, photographers, everyone we work with is from our community, and I’m really proud of this.

Our office is filled with music and tacos. It’s a super fun creative environment where everyone is fighting over the aux cord to put each other up on new music or some shit we think the other has never heard. Music is the catalyst of why I started the brand. Bella Doña, all of it, was inspired by my struggles as an indie artist and me trying to find other creative ways to push my music and message.

Basically ???

A post shared by LaLa Romero?? (@lalaromero) on


We have a taco stand on the corner up from our office. We reward ourselves with tacos when we finish our to-do list every day!

3:30 p.m.

✨BEATS1✨

A post shared by LaLa Romero?? (@lalaromero) on


I head to Beats 1. If I’m busy with Bella Doña or my music stuff, I Uber so I can continue to work.
I get an oatmeal peanut soy smoothie every day [around this time] when I get to the studio! I’m a creature of habit. This smoothie is like a sweet reminder I’m halfway through my day!

4:00 p.m.


I start my show prep, run through new music and my show with my producers. It’s like dress rehearsal because my show is live!

5:00 p.m.


From 5–7 p.m., I’m strictly in BEATS 1 mode. I’m checking out new music, playing requests and talking to listeners. For those two hours, I force myself to not to even look at my texts or emails. I like to stay in the music and in the moment; the rest of my life gets put on hold for those two hours. I get so hype to crack the mic every day that if I think about it too much, I get nervous. I’m broadcasting to the entire world, and I’m among people like Ebro Darden and Elton John on any given Monday.

I’m extremely passionate about Beats 1 because of the platform it offers artists, especially indie artists. I’ve been indie my whole career. I know the struggles personally. I was tired of the music business telling me there wasn’t a market for my music. They weren’t understanding that this is viable. There’s no one speaking for this demographic of people, where are the people telling our stories. We exist. Our stories are important.

7:00 p.m.

Spent the day in studio with this beauty!! @reverielove X @kinglilg X me coming soon! ???????

A post shared by LaLa Romero?? (@lalaromero) on


Once I wrap my show, I switch gears and start working on my music. Today, I was dealing with logos for my new record label. I have a bunch of deadlines to meet for my mixtape and for my next two music videos, which I’m finishing up now.

8:00 p.m.

Love hard 365 ❣

A post shared by LaLa Romero?? (@lalaromero) on


I order delivery for dinner so I can work on my mixtape release. Currently, I’m working on video treatments, and locking in locations and styling. As an indie artist, it’s like five times the amount of work when I shoot a video. But I’m a total control freak, so I wouldn’t have it any other way. I love planning and shooting videos. It’s so much fun bringing my songs to life!

12:00 a.m.


I read a little bit before bed. I’m obsessed with memoirs and biographies. Right now I’m reading Kim Gordon’s “Girl In A Band” and Angie Martinez’s “My Voice.” These two books just happen to be about women who kicked down doors and lit the way for so many in the music business. It’s a pretty cool note to fall asleep on!

1:30 a.m.



I walk Biggie and time for bed!

Photos courtesy of @lalaromero‘s Instagram


READ: Meet Lora Arellano, the Latina Makeup Artist Rihanna Swears By

Don’t forget to click that share button below to inspire your friends!

Chiquis And Becky G Release Video For Spanish-Language Version Of Dolly Parton’s Hit Song ‘Jolene’

Entertainment

Chiquis And Becky G Release Video For Spanish-Language Version Of Dolly Parton’s Hit Song ‘Jolene’

ChiquisOnline / YouTube

Dolly Parton’s “Jolene” is arguably one of the most iconic songs in American music. We have all heard bits and pieces of the song growing up because it is just that iconic. After almost 50 years, “Jolene” has another Spanish-language cover brought to us by Becky G and Chiquis.

Spanish-speaking country music fans have a new cover to celebrate.

Becky G and Chiquis have released the music video for their Spanish-language cover of the American classic song “Jolene.” Originally released by Dolly Parton in 1973, “Jolene” is one of those songs that have become a timeless classic of American music.

Country music is quickly becoming a favorite genre in the Latino community. There has been a 25 percent increase in Latino support of country music. When you consider how many Latinos live in the south in states like Texas, it kind of makes sense.

Rolling Stone magazine claimed that it was the first Spanish-language cover of the song.

The magazine got called out on Twitter after claiming that this was the first Spanish-language cover of “Jolene.” The cover by regional Mexican music divas Becky G and Chiquis is good but it is not the first.

The first Spanish-language cover of “Jolene” is by Las Chicas del Can.

The Dominican group recorded “Youlin” in 1985 and the merengue take on the song is really fun to listen to. The version from the girl group is a very different take and feel on the song as compared to Becky G and Chiquis. The two songs are very different and both are very fun to listen to.

Either way, fans of country and regional Mexican music are here for this.

The music video is an animated rollercoaster with Becky G and Chiquis playing tough mujeres doing their thing. The music video is set up like a comic book because we all know that the most amazing superhero stories are comic books. Tbh, these two looked perfect in their tough acting roles.

If you want to listen to the original “Jolene,” here it is.

Truly, this will probably remain one of the greatest American classics of all time.

READ: Becky G Performs Tribute To Selena At San Antonio Concert

Conciencia Collective Is Bringing Together Artists To Tackle The Real Issues

Entertainment

Conciencia Collective Is Bringing Together Artists To Tackle The Real Issues

goyocqt / rafapabonmusic / Instagram

Conciencia Collective is bringing together some of the biggest names in entertainment to tackle some of the biggest issues. The Black Lives Matter protests have led to some long-needed change to police in Black and brown community. Afro-Latinos have been in the fight against the police brutality mixed with the anti-Blackness from fellow Latinos. On June 26, three Afro-Latinos will discuss the movement and the need to ensure that Black Lives Matter.

Check out the discussion today on YouTube, Conciencia’s Facebook, or mitú’s Facebook.

The death of George Floyd has ignited a fight for Black lives that we haven’t seen in a long time.

Thousands of people have been protesting against police brutality and are demanding a change to policing in the U.S. The protests have been ongoing for weeks and they are creating change. States and cities across the country have started to reduce funding for police departments. Congresspeople and senators are calling for a federal change to policing in the U.S. through legislation.

Major corporations have joined social media solidarity in support of Black Lives Matter. People are now holding those corporations accountable. Protesters want to see these same corporations follow through and offer resources to help in the fight.

Gloria “Goyo” Martínez, the Afro-Colombian singer, will be there to discuss the movement in Latin America.

The singer from ChocQuibTown wrote an open letter addressing the death of George Floyd. She did not hold back when she talked about the racism she was seeing from people in Latin America in the face of the violence.

“The great reality is that there is no racial equality in the United States or Latin America,” Goyo wrote. “I saw many comments, hundreds of people normalizing the subject saying, ‘But this also happens to white people,’ ‘But black people are criminals,’ ‘Maybe if they dressed like normal people,’ ‘They’re just hurt’ or ‘You are the racists by posting messages that only produce more pain.'”

Goyo is a big proponent of education leading the way to an anti-racist and more accepting future.

“It’s clear to me that ethno-education (or cultural and intercultural education) is the path to becoming antiracists. Learning about other cultures is important for understanding the context in which we are living,” Goyo says. “There are Afro-Latinxs, who because of a lack of education on this subject, don’t know their history, nor do they identify as Afros until they leave their countries and are discriminated for being Latinxs and for being Black. If many Afro-Latinxs are unaware, imagine a white/mixed music industry making decisions based on misguided marketing studies, which exclude and stereotype based on skin color. In Latin America, there aren’t real statistics on the Afro population. Knowing the situation that more than 100 million Black people live in would help in understanding the issue, there is a lot of history and many organizations have been working on racism. Today continue to raise their voices. Continuing to speak openly would help industries not to reinforce racist stereotypes, to continue to close the doors that are opened thanks to talent.”

Rafa Pabón is another voice on the panel this week.

The trapero is calling for a unity in the Latino community to fight against the racism that is plaguing every aspect of society. Pabón wants to know that protesters and BLM supporters are not backing down from fighting against racism.

“It is important that we mobilize and use our voices. We cannot normalize this kind of situation. Racism is inhuman and I have never understood it. We have to fight together against institutional racism,” Pabón says. “There is still so much to do, Floyd is one of so many cases, we cannot stop fighting for justice.”

Sociologist Aurora Vergara-Figueroa will be the moderator of the event.

Aurora Vergara Figueroa is the director of the Afrodiasporic Studies Center (Centro de Estudios Afrodiaspóricos) at Icesi University in Cali, Colombia. The Afro-Colombian scholar holds a Ph.D. from the Sociology Department of the University of Massachusetts Amherst. She concentrated on the sociological study of Afro-Colombians deracinated from the Colombian Pacific coast and the long durée of land dispossession in the world-system. Recipient of the LASA/OXFAM America 2014 Martin Diskin Dissertation Award, Vergara-Figueroa develops research on the Afrodiasporic feminist movement in Colombia. Vergara-Figueroa is currently working with Doctor Carmen Cosme Puntiel on a co-edited volume tentatively titled: Challenging Enslavement: Black Women’s Strategies of Resistance in Nueva Granada (Colombia), Venezuela, Brazil, and Cuba 1550-1900.

Her main research interests are Feminist Critique, African Diaspora Studies, Sociological Theory, Critical Race Theory, Political Economy, Political Sociology, and Comparative Historical Sociology.

We are Conciencia Collective, an alliance against racial and social injustice conscious of the need to create long-lasting and impactful changes. Comprising of +35 executives from the Latin music industry including activists, journalists, managers, publicists, lawyers, directors, on-air talent, and content creators who came together in solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement to create awareness about racial and social injustice with the intention to educate our colleagues, artists, and peers of influence in order to gain their advocacy. Our ongoing initiatives also focus on the many issues affecting our Latin community.

READ: Model Joan Smalls Is Donating Half Of Her Salary To Black Lives Matter