Culture

Your Office Might be Boring, Unless there are Some Latinos, Here’s Why

Working in an office with where the majority of employees are Latinos is… kind of the best work environment imaginable. With mariachis in the office, jokes you can finally tell in Spanish and the food, work feels more like a cousin’s birthday party than actual work because…

It Starts with the Saludo

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You can’t get away with running to your desk and pretending you don’t see everyone…that’ll get you the death stare, like the one mom gave you when you didn’t say hi to aaaall your tías y tíos.

…Y Se Saluda de Beso

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Waving just doesn’t cut it. You greet your coworkers as you would your Tía Chata.

Like Family Parties, Conference Rooms are Themed

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In this case, the theme is chile. There’s Tapatío, Tajín, Tabasco, Cholula, Valentina, on and on and on…

READ: #GrowingUpHispanic Means VapoRub, Walter Mercado, Chanclas, and So Much Cleaning

The Wall Art is Anything but Standard

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No boring corporate art here.

The Kitchen is the Heart of the Office

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The pantry is just like the one at abuelita’s house.

READ: Tortilla Loving, Salsa Dancing and Other Signs Your Dog Is Latino

So is the Kitchen Cantina

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It doesn’t stop there. Every executive office has a stocked mini bar.

The Smells During Lunchtime are Like…

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Because everyone brings home-cooked meals enchiladas, mofongo, even ceviche. None of that basic sandwich sh*t.

Everyone. Is. So. Loud.

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And this includes carcajadas at all hours of the day because the jokes are nonstop.

You’re Never Sure What Language People are Speaking

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One minute it’s English, then it switches to Spanish, then Spanglish and before the conversation’s over you’re hearing words you never knew existed. Does anyone know what chincual means? ?

Cursing is a Natural Thing

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No one gasps or bleeps you out when you say guey, pinche or ch*ngado, because there really is no replacement for those words.

There’s Always a Reason to Celebrate

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And mariachis in the office are not a rare occurrence.

All-hands Go a Little Something Like This…

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We get PUMPED.

Basically, it’s one big party and we still get sh*t done.

What do you like about working with Latinos? Click the share button below and let us know!

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Women Are Sharing Why Gut Instincts Made Them Turn Down A Dream Job

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Women Are Sharing Why Gut Instincts Made Them Turn Down A Dream Job

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We’re all familiar with the phrase “trust your gut.” Of course, while the ability to suss out a situation based on instinct might not always lead us down the easiest path, for the most part, many people believe that relying on our gut can help us get through even the hardest life experiences and oftentimes avoid them. In fact, according to research, the belief of trusting in one’s gut is upheld by over half of people living in the United States. But what about when your gut-instinct leads you away from something you might really want?

Recently, a post shared to Instagram about gut instinct caught our attention.

The post served as a reminder to us that its imperative to truly weigh what matters to you when considering a new job or promotion. Still, we couldn’t help but wonder what Latinas think. So we asked and got a whole heck of a lot of advice and answers.

Check them out below!

gverseukYessss! We need to be able to say no to a job with an organisation that we don’t think is right for us. However, this often isn’t an option for many of us, particularly womxn. 😩2d8 likesReply

meeze_82This is goals for me. To get my girls to where they can decline jobs offers becuase they’re smart and strong enough to know they can do better. 👏1d3 likesReply

theresalwayzplanzI took a job that paid more money but i didnt know what the work environment would be like. It was awesome making more money, but it was the first time i felt my mental health be in danger. I left. It was the best thing i did.1d2 likesReply

bellabelicenaAbsolutely! Prioritizing your mental wellness always comes first.♥️2dReply

jojajessI declined a job offer 2 wks ago during an interview. It was so awkward, but I was NOT feeling it. I flat out told her that I needed my job to contribute as much to me as I do to it.

“I ignored my gut for a job with a really significant pay increase in an upper management position. I regretted my decision the first few days I was there, the company culture was horrible, and the work hours were horrendous (11 hour days were seen as “normal”, you weren’t seen as a hard worker / dedicated employee unless you put in 70 hours or more.)” – TrifectaLoser

“I met a gentleman who said he always walks with the boss through the office. If the workers change their demeanor, for example stop smiling and talking and start looking busy, he won’t work there. Your thing looks similar, see how the employees interact and maybe even ask.” reidmrdotcom

“I may be stuck in my ways, but I won’t even go for an interview if I’m going to struggle commuting there, never mind moving to a new city etc just to take the job. But that said, definitely trust your gut.” –johnbarrymore2013

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Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez And ‘Roma’ Actress Yalitza Aparicio Are Working On A Project Together

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Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez And ‘Roma’ Actress Yalitza Aparicio Are Working On A Project Together

YalitzaAparicio / Twitter

Ever since her breakout role in Alfonso Cuarón’s “Roma,” indigenous Mexican actress Yalitza Aparicio has made an effort to support the very domestic workers she played a part in representing on screen. Now the former schoolteacher is taking her role as an activist for domestic workers by fighting for the community. And with her, she’s brought on a major advocate.

In an effort to further the discussion regarding domestic worker’s rights, Aparicio has paired up with Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.)

During a meeting set in Washington, D.C. the two women are said to have talked about the rights of domestic workers worldwide.

In a post to their respective social media pages, the two Latinas praised each other for their efforts.

“When you fight for the rights of domestic workers, it’s not only for and by those women, but also so that their children can have a better future.’ These inspiring words from Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez I will hold forever in my heart,” Aparicio wrote in a post on Wednesday that was written in Spanish. “I had the honor of meeting this strong, talented and brave woman who works day after day to improve the social conditions in her country. Thanks to our meeting, we can listen to each other and share our point of view about the rights of domestic workers.”

In a tweet of her own, AOC described meeting Aparicio as an honor.

“It was an honor to meet you, @YalitzaAparicio,” Ocasio-Cortez wrote in a reply that was also written in Spanish. “You are an inspiration for women and workers around the world. Thank you for the conversation. Together, we fight for the rights of domestic workers.”

In 2018, Aparicio shot to fame for her role as Cleo in the Spanish-language film “Roma.”

Aparicio played the part of woman working in the household of a middle-class family in Mexico and garnered her much praise. For her role, Aparicio also earned an Oscar nomination. She has since worked to use her platform as a place to elevate the voices of indigenous peoples, domestic workers across the globe and women.

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