#mitúVOICE

How I Avoided a Nasty Breakup with My College Roommates

The relationship you have with college roommates can be as tumultuous as any other relationship and, if not handled with care, can end ugly. After four years at UC Berkeley and 12 roommates, here’s what I did to avoid becoming a roommate horror story…

I hid the sweet stuff.

FullSizeRender
Credit: Natalie Barba

Being hangry is a real thing.  So stashing my Mazapanes, paletas de chile y chicles, kept my roommates and me from next level fights – the number 1 reason college roommates brawl.

I labeled the essentials.

IMG_2285
Credit: mitú

Cause what’s mine is mine.

My roommates and I gave each other a heads up when we had guests staying over.

tumblr_inline_nscd6y3oL11qafrh6_500-1
Credit: fuckyeahreactions / Tumblr

We agreed how long boyfriends were allowed to stay, who’s stuff they were allowed to use and that they had to clean up after themselves…I’m the roommate, not the house maid.

And, when stays were unplanned, we subtly indicated the room was occupied.

0bf0a36e39da855532e5e586f884cfd4
Credit: Mark Debrone / Pinterest

…OR made it clear the room was occupied.

6885bf008d118e851cfafaf4f53a8571
Credit: aliviabrininstool / Tumblr

This avoided awkward, humiliating encounters. But really, it’s about having respect for one another ?.

When roommates needed cash, I pretended I didn’t have any.

tumblr_ntxk8hsYmy1qlzef1o1_500
Credit: africansouljah / Tumblr

I fell victim to people pretending they forgot they owed me money. You live and you learn.

Living with three other girls, I also made sure our favorite room had rules.

tumblr_n5c43vdMjp1txntnio5_250
Credit: Screen Gems Films / brookedavis / Tumblr

It’s called knocking.

READ: Stressed Out? Reasons You Should Have Chilled in College

I joined a “study group.”

tumblr_mnkv13X6BQ1rbl8uzo4_250

Credit: Screen Gems Films / fans-for-danneel / Tumblr

I loved my roommates, but sometimes I needed a break. Bye!

…And made other friends.

tumblr_ntn8peNvGI1spadc1o8_500
Credit: CW / prettygirl-with-an-uglysecret / Tumblr

For those days I really needed to get away from the clingy roommate.

I invested in headphones.

tumblr_md8saqX6gE1qf5zmno1_500
Credit: baronesajuicy / Tumblr

Excuse me? Were you talking to me?

We opened a Netflix account.

tumblr_ntcrbpSSOd1rwkbteo1_1280

Credit: euphoria-land / Tumblr

To binge watch Grey’s Anatomy, OITNB and Breaking Bad together. It’s called bonding.

READ: Things I Wish I’d Known Before College

I made sure to show how much I appreciated them with thoughtful gifts.

tumblr_nt5py83HJk1rmmqw5o1_500
Credit: getfreesampleswithoutsurveys / Tumblr

Like Breathe Right nasal strips when snoring kept me from sleeping ☺️.

…And this is why I’ve been everyone’s favorite roommate.

tumblr_mbtve0iKI61r0wrxvo1_250
Credit: yngchrissy / Tumblr

What did you do to bond with your college roommates? mitú wants to know. Let us know in the comments below. 

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

The First Ever Tribally-Associated Medical School Opened On Cherokee Lands

Things That Matter

The First Ever Tribally-Associated Medical School Opened On Cherokee Lands

Credit: Getty Images

In this unprecedented year that has pushed the boundaries of the healthcare industry past its breaking point, a new kind of medical school is making history. A medical school that caters to Indigenous American medical students.

The school is called Oklahoma State University College of Osteopathic Medicine at the Cherokee Nation (COMCN), and it will be the first tribally-associated medical school in the U.S.

Largely the brainchild of former principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation, Bill John Baker, the project aims to combine the practices of traditional healing practice of the Cherokee people with Western medical teachings.

Bill John Baker’s original goal was to invest money into the Cherokee Nation medical system. His fundraising efforts drew the attention of Oklahoma State University, who approached the then-principal Chief with the idea of opening up a medical school on reservation lands. To him, the decision was a no-brainer.

“After we were removed from tribal lands and there were no teachers, we invested our treasury into teachers. This is a natural progression. Just as our ancestors grew their own teachers 150 years ago, we want to grow our own doctors,” Bill John Baker told Medscape.

As recent reports have detailed, Indigenous communities are being disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.

According to the CDC, Indigenous Americans are testing positive for COVID-19 at 3.5 times the rate of white Americans. This is largely due to lingering historical inequities and structural failings that negatively impact the overall health of Indigenous Americans.

One of the solutions to this institutional failing is to recruit and train more doctors of color–in this case, more Indigenous American doctors. As of now, 0.4% of doctors in the U.S. identify themselves as being American Indian or Alaska Native.

Since COMCN is a state school, non-Indigenous students are welcome to study at the school as well. According to the university’s states, 22% of its students identify as Native American, while they make up less than 1% of the U.S. population.

The devastation that COVID-19 has wrought globally has spurred an uptick in medical school applications.

In what has been dubbed the “Fauci Effect”, the number of potential students applying to medical school is up 18% this year from last year. It seems that this global health crisis has sparked a desire in certain people dedicate their lives to medicine.

So COMCN couldn’t come at a better time. America needs more Indigenous doctors and COMCN is here to teach them.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Rep. Ruben Gallego Broke Down Jared Kushner’s White Privilege In A Twitter Thread About Their Paths To Harvard

Things That Matter

Rep. Ruben Gallego Broke Down Jared Kushner’s White Privilege In A Twitter Thread About Their Paths To Harvard

Greg Nash / Pool / AFP via Getty Images

Jared Kushner recently made headlines for saying that Black Americans have to “want to be successful.” Kushner continued in the Fox & Friends interview saying that Trump policies are trying to help them with issues that “they’re complaining about.” Congressman Ruben Gallego of Arizona took to Twitter to call out Kushner and his easy, money-paved path in life after the interview aired.

Rep. Ruben Gallego has a few words about Jared Kushner’s claim that Black Americans don’t “want to be successful.”

Kushner, Ivanka Trump’s husband, was being interviewed by Fox & Friends when he suggested that Black Americans don’t want to successful. He added that the Trump administration has created policies to help Black Americans. Specifically, the Trump administration has created policies to help Black Americans overcome things that “they’re complaining about.”

The interview was immediately slammed by Democrats and activists as being tone deaf. Furthermore, the rhetoric is reminiscent of language used against the Black community for decades to justify policies that disenfranchised and injured the Black community.

Rep. Gallego was one of Kushner’s classmates at Harvard and the two had very different paths to the prestigious school.

Rep. Gallego created a Twitter thread to show the hoops he had to jump through in order to make it to Harvard. As a Latino from a middle class family, Rep. Gallego didn’t have a lot of the same luxuries afford to him like someone of Kushner’s background. The congressman’s story about his way to the Ivy League school is something a lot of people of color can relate to.

The story is an extension and deeper dive into the college admission scandal narrative.

Rep. Gallego detailed his four years in high school with the mission of making it to Harvard. For him, that meant studying for his exams for years with free and used test preps he could get his hands on. There was a community support to make it possible for him to get materials he needed.

According to Data USA, Harvard’s student body is heavily white. The data shows that 41 percent of students are white, 13.5 percent are Asian, 8.19 percent are Hispanic or Latino, and 5.35 percent Black or African-American.

Even the interviewing process was something so many other students didn’t have to contend with.

Some universities, especially ivy league schools, require prospective students to interview with alums and administrators. These interviews weigh heavily in the process and for Rep. Gallego, they were not easy to get to. He had to rely on public transportation to make it to his various interviews around Chicago.

Rep. Gallego spent four years getting ready to go to Harvard.

After four years of hard work and sacrifice, Rep. Gallego was accepted to Harvard. His path to Harvard was filled with friends and family helping him along the way, which is common in Latino communities. It is a story that many of us are familiar with but it isn’t a truly universal story, as Rep. Gallego points out about Kushner.

Kushner’s easy path to Harvard is why the congressman took issue with Kushner’s comments.

Documents show that Kushner got into Harvard after his father pledged a $2.5 million gift to be paid in annual installments of $250,000. Both of Kushner’s parents were also members of Harvard’s Committee of University Resources and donated to the school. In an interview with ProPublica, a former administrator at Kushner’s high school admitted that no one at the school believed that he got admitted on his own merit. The official said that neither his grades nor SAT scores warranted his admission into Harvard.

Rep. Gallego ended his thread asking people to donate to the Biden campaign and the United Negro College Fund.

Rep. Gallego is clearly not letting this story go by without weighing in. Kushner’s comments have set off a firestorm of frustration with people across the nation.

READ: College Admissions Scandal Mastermind Reportedly Told Parents To Lie About Ethnicity To Further Advantage Their White Children

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com