Entertainment

11 Centerpieces For Thanksgiving That Are Pure Ingenuity

Decorations and holidays go together like cupcakes and hipsters. But if you’re like a lot of us, you’re probably a little strapped, and so doing Thanksgiving a lo grande might be out of your budget. Whether or not you’ve got a few friends coming over, or all 27 of your tíos, prepping can be stressful. Have no fear, here are a few cheap DIY centerpiece ideas we found to make your Thanksgiving Day dinner table pop.

Bring out that cool vase your roommate uses to make his room smell weird.

#valentinesday #early #flowers #luckyme #novasesinthehouse #goodthingwesmokeherb #bongvase #pretty #creative

A photo posted by Melissa Wolf (@meliwolff) on

It even has a nifty little side vase for smaller flowers.

Steal Borrow some flowers from your neighbors garden and put them in a drinking glass.

Table is ready ☝?️??? #MexicanTable #SabadoDePozole #mommystable #interiordesign #mexicandesign

A photo posted by Rosella Viniegra (@roxeliitaa) on

On the downside, this kind of floral arrangement can obstruct your view of certain family members. On the upside, this kind of floral arrangement can obstruct your view of certain family members.

Grab something from the recycle bin!

Meet Larry… ? #larryfitzgerald #bettafish #partida #tequilabottle

A photo posted by jessiearow (@jessiearow) on

If you’re like me, there’s always a few empty tequila bottles just waiting for a second chance. Pure class.

No fish? No problem. Grab some dirt and flowers.

If you’re going to spend more than 10 dollars on a bottle of Tequila, you might as well get your money’s worth.

Here’s a perfect arts and crafts project from your little primo.

Creations #MexicanCenterpiece #MexicanTheme learning new things ☺️??????

A photo posted by Mari Martinez (@jorgemary) on

I remember the first time I helped my tío decorate one of his empties. Glitter, glue, and some left over Cinco de Mayo flowers, and we had an instant centerpiece masterpiece.

You can never go wrong with the color scheme of Café Bustelo.

Café Bustelo❣️☕️? #bettisotosucculents

A photo posted by Kelly Betti Soto???? (@kbetti) on

Definitely one of the classiest coffee cans on the shelf. You don’t need much to say a lot.

You can also use El Pato salsa cans for small accents.

Just like Bustelo, the red and yellow scheme really brings out the colors in any floral arrangement.

If you’re not a fan of the can, just throw every flower ever into it. Draw attention away from the offending vase.

After Thanksgiving, you can sell this on Etsy for few bucks.

Grab some rubble from the bottom of an aquarium. Instant centerpiece.

The ingenuity.

If you see anyone do this, report them.

Why would anyone do this to a molcajete? These look like sad little hedgehogs.

 I. Can’t. Even.


Don’t try to go all out. Just have fun. And remember…

CREDIT: KING PRODUCTION / TWITTER

It’s all about that food.

READ: #ThanksgivingWithHispanics is the Realest Thanksgiving Depiction Ever

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Leftover Turkey? Make Salvadoran Pan Con Pavo And You Won’t Regret It

Culture

Leftover Turkey? Make Salvadoran Pan Con Pavo And You Won’t Regret It

There is nothing more Thanksgiving than being stuck with way too many leftovers. The after is when you usually have to figure out how you are going to handle the leftovers so they don’t go bad. Some people usually make soups or sandwiches with their turkey meat. If the thought of turkey sandwiches for three days straight is causing you to go into a food coma already, try a traditional Salvadoran pan con pavo. It just might be the trick to make the leftovers better than you ever remembered them being.

Pan con pavo could easily be the best thing about Thanksgiving.

Pan con pavo (translated literally to mean bread with turkey), is not your average deli sandwich. When it comes to pan con chumpe (another name for the turkey sandwich), the messier it gets, the better. All you po’ boy fans understand how a messy sandwich is a good sandwich.

The most important part of this dish is warming up your turkey slices and bathing them in relajo, a tomato-based Salvadoran sauce.

This mildly spicy sauce recipe calls for roma tomatoes, onion, garlic cloves, bay leaves and a few more ingredients. The sauce can also be made with pumpkin seeds and sometimes goes by the name salsa criolla. Next, place the marinated turkey into sliced and toasted bread, traditionally a bolillo roll. Slice up some fresh tomatoes, cucumbers, radishes, watercress and lettuce (but not romaine lettuce because of the recent E.Coli outbreak) for some fresh crunch when you take a bite.

The scrumptious might be the new Thanksgiving tradition you’ve been looking for.

Finally, you can add some finishing touches such as mustard mixed with mayonnaise, green olives, or the traditional curtido reserved for pupusas.

Boom—that’s it. No wonder this Twitter user told Food Network pan con pavo is really the only poll option.

It’s an easy leftover dish to make when all you want to do is catch up on your latest Netflix shows or watch some football in your sweats. However, some pan con pavo stans are not waiting for the day after Thanksgiving to eat one of their all-time favorite holiday dishes.

This person made pan con pavo the star of their plate.

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I love the holidays 🤤 #PanConPavo

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There truly is never a wrong time or way to eat a delicious pan con pavo during the holidays.

Basically, you should be finding a Salvadoran family to take you in for Thanksgiving.

A Salvadoran Thanksgiving will change everything that you know about the food-based holiday.

People who are for pan con pavo claim it is the best way to enjoy the holiday staple.

There is so much love and demand for the sandwich that we should all be trying it, honestly.

Here’s one more mouthwatering picture of the amazing sandwich.

So, are you going to try this dish for your Thanksgiving leftovers this year or is this a classic that is often at your Thanksgiving table?


READ: Memes That Perfectly Describe How Latinos Feel About The Holiday Season

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Latinos Are Some Of The Most Festive People And These Traditions Prove It

Culture

Latinos Are Some Of The Most Festive People And These Traditions Prove It

@CNNTravel / Twitter

We all experienced that moment when you realized you celebrated holidays a little different in your Latino household. Maybe it was when you realized that they didn’t celebrate Three Kings Day with shoes and boxes filled with hay. Or maybe your realization came when your friends and their families didn’t eat grapes for good luck at their New Years Ever party.

Seeing all of the traditions written down just makes them all the more heartwarming. Read on if you’re already getting warm, fuzzy feelings.

Día de las Velitas honors the beginning of the holiday season.

CREDIT: Untitled. Digital Image. Huffington Post. 25 September 2018.

In Colombia, the day is celebrated on December 7, but as we already know, Costco begins celebrating on August 20th. You can buy your Halloween, Thanksgiving and Christmas decorations all at the same time there.

We literally only cook out of toddler size pots during the holidays.

CREDIT: @AnahyCiriza / Twitter

If your tía can’t post a joke picture of one of your primitos in the pot, then it’s not big enough. We eat a lot so there always has to be too much food.

Dancing tías flock to la tamalada at your house for three straight days.

CREDIT: @AliciaWLTX / Twitter

If you’ve never seen a group of mamis y tías making tamales for the holidays, you have not experienced efficiency. It is an assembly line process that will surprise anyone.

We can’t wait for Christmas so we celebrate Buena Noche.

CREDIT: @harmonylael / Twitter

The big family dinner is on Christmas Eve and everyone stays up late drinking coquito, eating waves of flan y natilla, and waiting for the clock to strike midnight. Then all the kids start opening their presents because it’s *technically* Christmas.

The Oaxaca Radish Festival in Mexico is incredible.

CREDIT: @CNNTravel / Twitter

Known as “Noche de Rabanos,” the main square of Oaxaca is flooded with artisan created radish carvings on December 23. They’re often molded into nativity scenes, and there’s always food and dancing.

Boricuas will parranda your casa up.

CREDIT: @CortesBob / Twitter

We thrive on barging into people’s homes and making a party. The parranda is a Puerto Rican tradition that literally entitles you to takeover your friends’ homes with live music. You’ll never know when it’s going to happen so just always be ready with food for an extra 20 Puerto Ricans and you’ll have a good time.

If you’re religious, you participate in La Novena.

CREDIT: @PromiseArizona / Twitter

Every night in the nine days before Christmas, you sing prayers around your local nativity scene. In this picture, Arizona Latinos sang their 2017 novena for the “families unjustly detained.” ✊🏽

After la novena, you might remember singing villancicos.

CREDIT: @SenoritaRacicot / Twitter

They’re basically just Spanish Christmas carols. They go back hundreds of years and are actually poems. Popular songs include “Noche de paz,” “Los peces en el río,” “Campana sobre campana” and “Mi Burrito Saberno.”

In Venezuela, they roll through patinatas.

CREDIT: @ladytrample / Twitter

In the week leading up to Christmas Eve, people will just take to closed-off roads or plazas to roller skate in what they call a “patinata.”

Of course, there are always the posadas.

CREDIT: kat_egli / Flickr

Unlike the standard family masses that include a group of kids acting out the nativity story, posadas take to different neighborhood each night. The children knock on a door and sing a song asking for space at their inn. The hosts will sing back to them and welcome them in for ponche, buñelos and tamales.

You’ll never forget the torture of La Misa del Gallo.

CREDIT: @Rafael_belgom / Twitter

Also known as “Rooster’s Mass,” because it happens at midnight on Christmas Eve. Traditionally, in Rome and Spain, Misa del Gallo is celebrated at the crack of dawn, but when it was assimilated into Mexico, rural families adjusted the tradition so they can go back to their farms and take care of the animals.

Latinos also have Día de los Reyes Magos to look forward to.

CREDIT: @slatinamerica / Twitter

If your parents were super traditional, they would only let you open one present on Buena Noche and wait until Three Kings Day for the rest.

In Puerto Rico, we put a shoebox of hay under the bed the night before Three Kings Day.

CREDIT: Untitled. Digital Image. El Boricua. 25 September 2018.

Instead of putting out cookies for Santa, we leave hay under the bed for the camels who are carrying the Three Kings to eat. The next morning, we wake up and there’s a present there instead.

Then there are the NYE traditions like Año Viejo.

CREDIT: @cristiancrespoj / Twitter

Some people ring in the new year by building a cardboard doll that represents the bad times of the last year. Then the doll is set on fire at midnight in hopes of burning away the past and bringing in a brighter new year.

Caption: “The old year of San Juan de Colón in # Tachira pays homage in its burning of this year to Neomar Lander, hero of the # Resistance of # Venezuela assassinated by the Maduro Narcotics. Like other more than 130 young people also killed in the fight for freedom! Maduro will fall !!!!”

The tastiest tradition is to eat twelve grapes after midnight.

CREDIT: @theleaguelady / Twitter

You make a wish for every month of the new year and then they all come true. The tradition originates in Spain, but has become popular all over Latin America.

Leave it to Latinos to make cleaning a ritual tradition.

CREDIT: @HomesiteServ / Twitter

We already do it every Saturday, but every New Years Eve, you spend the whole morning deep cleaning the house, because “a clean slate starts with a clean house.” Cubans will hold on to the bucket of dirty water until midnight and throw it over the balcony to cleanse bad energy from the last year.

Oh, and you have to wear yellow underwear on NYE.

CREDIT: Untitled. Digital Image. Korijock. 25 September 2018.

Some people have a tradition to change your underwear at midnight for good luck. Others swear that yellow underwear specifically will bring good luck.

Spend the last day of the year hiding money around your house.

CREDIT: “money in couch” Digital Image. Low Income Financial Help. 25 September 2018.

Ecuadorians claim this tradition which is meant to bring wealth in prosperity in the new year. I mean, it literally works because then you find all the money the next day and feel richer.

Brazilians hurry to the beach to jump over 7 waves after midnight.

CREDIT: “Jumping the waves” Digital Image. BBC. 25 September 2018.

The tradition comes from Candomblé, an African religion that was secretly practiced by the slaves from Bahia. Brazilian NYE parties also include hoards of people wearing all white, to symbolize peace and rebirth.

Dominicans pack a suitcase to their NYE parties.

CREDIT: “Image Credits: www.telegraph.co.uk “ Digital Image. Dubeat. 25 September 2018.

The tradition is to pack a suitcase and walk around the block to ensure safe travel for the following year. My family is lazy. We just take an empty suitcase and walk in circles around the house.


READ: 25 Latino Superstitions That Are Proven Fact

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