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9 Latino Investment Plans That Are Usually A Fail

One of the great things about coming from a Latino family is that you learn there’s more than one way to make an honest buck. While there’s nothing wrong with a simple 9 to 5 job, it’s the art of the hustle that highlights Latino ingenuity. Where some people see nothing, we see an opportunity. Every investment scheme plan is a chance to show off how brilliant your entrepreneur skills actually are. Let’s look at a few of the investment opportunities you and your family probably picked up along the way.

That broken car your dad bought and plans to fix up one day.

CREDIT: FOOD FOR DUDE / YOUTUBE

It’s been sitting on the lawn since your first day in grade school, but it’s definitely going to be worth it.

That one piece of art your mom thinks is worth a small fortune.

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She always tells the story about how she haggled a good price for it at the flea market.

That box of your tío’s old comic books.

He’s convinced these will be worth millions of dollars one day.

That QVC ceramic rooster your abuela bought when she was drunk on rum-spiked horchata.

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Abuela always talks about how she’s going to leave this to you in her will.

Abuelo invests in his domino skills to hustle kids out of their money.

CREDIT: Ender Özdemir / Youtube

No shirt? No problem. Abuelo’s got this.

Tía believes in high risk/high reward investments.

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Why go through all the trouble of waiting for stocks to appreciate?

Your little brother figured out how to make bank selling Takis at school.

CREDIT: Laura Argueta / Youtube

It might be a pyramid scheme, but he’s so good at it that he started his own YouTube channel to teach other kids how to invest.

Your primo knows that the real money is in investing in Grand Theft Auto 5 Yachts.

CREDIT: OLLI43 / YOUTUBE

For a little over $100 dollars in real world money, this $10 million yacht can be all yours. That’s what I call a sound investment.

Your parents are bad with money, but you’re not worried. You got that Pokémon.

CREDIT: PSAGRADED POKEMON CARDS / YOUTUBE

While everyone’s wasting money on lottery tickets, that sweet Charizard is going to pay for your first three years at college.


READ: Caso Cerrado’s ‘Pokemon Go’ Episode Was Full Of Delicious Chisme

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At 104 Years Of Age, Ray Chavez Hits The Gym He Can Visit Pearl Harbor

Identity

At 104 Years Of Age, Ray Chavez Hits The Gym He Can Visit Pearl Harbor

CREDIT: NBC NIGHTLY NEWS / FACEBOOK

Meet Ray Chavez.

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CREDIT: JELLYOFTHESEA / INSTAGRAM

Chavez is one of San Diego’s most distinguished residents.

At 104 years old, Chavez is the oldest surviving veteran of the Pearl Harbor attack that took place on Dec. 7, 1941.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BNp7pncBy0H/?tagged=raychavez


There are less than 2,000 Pearl Harbor survivors still living today.

Seaman 1st class Chavez was still in his twenties when Japanese warplanes attacked his base, located near Honolulu Hawaii.

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CREDIT: AMERICA’S NAVY / YOUTUBE

Over the course of the two hour attack, 2,403 people were killed, prompting President Roosevelt to call Dec. 7th, “a day that will live in infamy.”

In the aftermath, Chavez remained on continuous patrol for several days, witnessing the devastation first hand.

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During those anxious days, Chavez didn’t know if his wife or child had survived. Thankfully for Chavez, they survived.

Even at 104 years of age, Chavez still falls asleep thinking about the horrific events.

In an interview with People, Chavez’s daughter, Kathleen Chavez, who is also retired from the Navy, said that when Ray closes his eyes, he can “see, smell and hear every second.”

 As the war progressed, Chavez earned the rank of chief, but he retired from military life in 1945, due to PTSD-related issues.

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The events of the war took a strong toll on Chavez. For three months after his retirement, Chavez couldn’t stop shaking from the psychological trauma he’d endured, Kathleen told the San Diego Union-Tribune.

More than four decades after the war, Chavez couldn’t overcome the emotional hurdles to return to Pearl Harbor.

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CREDIT: NBC NIGHTLY NEWS / FACEBOOK

The emotional and mental burden was too much for him to bear, his daughter told People.

And then on the 50th anniversary of the attack in 1991, Chavez found the courage he needed to visit the memorial.


Earlier this year, Chavez spoke to the San Diego Union-Tribune about his first trip back, saying, “The first time I went back, I cried.”

Since then, Chavez has gotten older, but he’s not about to let his advanced age keep him from returning to Pearl Harbor.

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CREDIT: NBC NIGHTLY NEWS / FACEBOOK

Two times a week, for the last three years, Chavez and his personal trainer,  Sean Thompson, have kept the veteran in great shape.

The 104-year-old credits a healthy lifestyle and a personal trainer as the reason he’s still able to make the trip to Hawaii.

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CREDIT: NBC NIGHTLY NEWS / FACEBOOK

Chavez works out more than some people half his age.

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Thanks to his efforts in the gym — like his exercise bike routine — good health has enabled Chavez to make the long trip every year.

December 7th, 2016, marks the 75th anniversary of the attack, and Chavez was there to pay his respects.


A day that once lived in “infamy” is now a day to honor the bravery Chavez, and many other heroes, exhibited that harrowing day.

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CREDIT: SEAWOLF727 / INSTAGRAM

“I hope people never forget. They can’t,” Ray told People magazine.

Watch Ray prepare for the 75th anniversary of Pearl Harbor.

INSPIRING AMERICA: 3 years ago, 104-year-old US veteran Ray Chavez — the oldest-known Pearl Harbor attack survivor — started working with a trainer to prepare his body to make the trip to Hawaii this week to mark the 75th anniv. of the attack. #InspiringAmerica #PearlHarbor

Posted by NBC Nightly News with Lester Holt on Monday, December 5, 2016

READ: It’s 2016 And Latino Veterans Are Getting Discharged, Then Deported

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