Entertainment

Going Blind Hasn’t Stopped This Argentinian Skateboarder

This is Argentinian-born skateboarder Marcelo Lusardi.

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CREDIT: THE_BLIND_RIDER / INSTAGRAM

This is Lusardi on a skateboard. Pretty good, right?

CREDIT: THE_BLIND_RIDER / INSTAGRAM

In November of 2015, Lusardi completely lost his vision due to a genetic disease called lever optic neuropathy.

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CREDIT: RUNASTUDIO / YOUTUBE

Lusardi spent two weeks in the hospital while doctors figured out what was wrong with his vision. By the time Lusardi left the hospital, he had to rely on a cane when walking.

After going blind, Lusardi had to step away skateboarding.

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CREDIT: THE BLIND RIDER / INSTAGRAM

For most people, skateboarding is difficult enough even with perfect vision. For someone in Lusardi’s situation, it could lead to serious injury. To fill the hours, Lusardi focused on his guitar playing, but it wasn’t enough.

Not being able to ride a skateboard caused Lusardi to fall into a deep depression.

CREDIT: RUNASTUDIO / YOUTUBE

Having already lost his sight, losing skateboarding proved more than he could handle. His friends noticed how depressed Lusardi had become, and as any good friend would do, they convinced him to get back on his board.

With the help of his friends, Lusardi got back on his board. Of course, it took a little getting used to.

CREDIT: RUNASTUDIO / YOUTUBE

But with dedication and practice…

CREDIT: RUNASTUDIO/ YOUTUBE

…Lusardi eventually got the hang of riding with his cane.

CREDIT: The Blind Rider / Instagram

Lusardi got so good that he was able to skate without his cane.

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CREDIT: THE BLIND RIDER / INSTAGRAM 

In fact, Lusardi believes he’s actually better on a skateboard now than before he went blind.


Lusardi says the experience has made him a stronger person.

CREDIT: THE BIND RIDER / YOUTUBE

“[S]ometimes people have problems, and they think it’s the end of the world, and we should learn that we can overcome problems, because there’s a solution for everything in life.”

You can watch Marcelo Lusardi’s story here.

CREDIT: RUNASTUDIO / YOUTUBE

READ: Oakland A’s Slugger Chooses Mexico Over USA In World Baseball Classic

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People Have A Lot Of Opinions About The Argentina Episode Of Netflix’s ‘Street Food: Latin America’

Culture

People Have A Lot Of Opinions About The Argentina Episode Of Netflix’s ‘Street Food: Latin America’

Manuel Velasquez / Getty Images

Netflix has a new food show out and it has everyone buzzing. “Street Food: Latin America” is bringing everyone the sabor of Latin America to their living room. However, reviews are mixed because of Argentina and the lack of Central American representation.

Netflix has a new show and it is all about Latin American street food.

Some of the best food in the world comes from Latin America. That is just a fact and it isn’t because our families and community come for Latin America. Okay, maybe just a little. The food of Latin America comes with history and stories that have shaped our childhood. For many of us, it is the only thing we have that connects us to the lands our families have left.

The show is highlighting the contributions of women to street food.

“Street Food: Latin America” focuses mainly on the women that are leading the street food cultures in different countries in Latin America. For some of them, it was a chance to bring themselves out of poverty and care for their children. For others, it was a rebellion against the male-dominated culture of cooking in Latin America.

However, some people have some strong opinions about the show and they aren’t good.

There is a lot of attention to native communities in the Latino community culturally right now. The Argentina episode where someone claims that Argentina is more European is rubbing people the wrong way right now. While the native population of Argentina is small, it is still important to highlight and honor native communities who are indigenous to the lands.

The disregard for the indigenous community is upsetting because indigenous Argentinians are fighting for their lives and land.

An A Jazeera report focused on an indigenous community in northern Argentina who were fighting to protect their land. After decades of discrimination and humiliation, members of the Wichi community fought to protect their land from the Argentinian government grabbing it in 2017. Early this year, before Covid, children of the tribe started to die at alarming rates of malnutrition.

Another pain point in the Latino community is the complete disregard of Central America.

Central America includes Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Belize, and Panama. Central America’s exclusion is not sitting right with Netflix users with Central American heritage. Like, how can five whole countries be looked over during a Netflix show about street food in Latin America?

Seems like there is a chance for Netflix to revisit Latin America for more food content.

There are so many countries in Latin America that offer delicious foods to the world. There is more to Latin America than Brazil, Mexico, Peru, Argentina, Colombia, and Bolivia.

READ: This Iconic Mexican Food Won The Twitter Battle To Be Named Latin America’s Best Street Food

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After COVID-19 Shut Down Flights, A Man Sailed Across The Atlantic Ocean All So That He Could See His Dad

Things That Matter

After COVID-19 Shut Down Flights, A Man Sailed Across The Atlantic Ocean All So That He Could See His Dad

Getty Images Sport

For one Argentian man, there really ain’t no mountain high enough.

After the coronavirus pandemic halted international travel, Juan Manuel Ballestero set sail on a three-month-long high seas journey to his see his 90-year-old father, proving not even a novel virus could keep him from his dad.

Ballestero set out to see his father after his home country of Argentina canceled all international passenger flights in an effort to prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

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Misión cumplida! La fe cruza oceanos

A post shared by Juan Manuel Ballestero (@skuanavega) on

According to The New York Times, Ballestero had been on the Portugal island of Porto Santo when Argentina canceled international passenger flights. Still determined to see his father, Ballestero decided to set out on an 85-day sailing voyage across the Atlantic Ocean. All on his own.

“I didn’t want to stay like a coward on an island where there were no cases,” Juan Manuel said in an interview with The New York Times. “I wanted to do everything possible to return home. The most important thing for me was to be with my family.”

Ballestero is a veteran sailor and fisherman who has been a lover of water since he was 3 years old.

Still his family expressed that they were nervous about his decision to go his journey alone.

“The uncertainty of not knowing where he was for 50-some days was very rough, but we had no doubt this was going to turn out well,” his father, Carlos Alberto Ballestero said in an interview with The New York Times.

He also documented the trip all while on Instagram.

Though Ballestero made the trip home safe and sound, he did run into a few issues along the way.

Ballestero said that on April 12 authorities in Cape Verde barred him from docking his sailboat so that he could replenish his food supply and refuel his boat. At the time, Ballestero was eating only canned tuna, fruit, and rice. Because of Cape Verde’s denial, he was forced to continue forward with less fuel and rely on winds. What’s more, towards the end of his trip, Ballestero hit choppy waters and was forced to add an additional 10 days to his trip while in Vitória, Brazil.

Despite the complications, Ballestero said he never considered giving up. “I wasn’t afraid, but I did have a lot of uncertainty,” he explained. “It was very strange to sail in the middle of a pandemic with humanity teetering around me… There was no going back.”

Ballestero arrived on June 17 in Mar del Plata.

“Entering my port where my father had his sailboat, where he taught me so many things and where I learned how to sail and where all this originated, gave me the taste of a mission accomplished,” he shared before revealing that he had to take a test for COVID-19 before he could see his family. Fortunately, after 72 hours of waiting for his results, he found out that he was COVID-19-free and able to enter Argentina.

Despite his long trip, Ballestero said that he’s eager to hit the waters again soon.

“What I lived is a dream. But I have a strong desire to keep on sailing.”

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