Culture

The Best Emoji Texts Only Latinos Totally Get

emoji

Emojis are a universal language spoken through just one tiny image. However, there are certain emoji sequences only Latinos get. Here’s proof:

The one from the Selena enthusiast…

IMG_4721

Wait, there’s not a sparkly bra emoji? Apple, get on that!

The one from the had-too-much-fun-last-night dude…

pedo

We’ve all been there.

The one from mom…

emoji

“Mija, where’s the cilantro emoji?”

READ: Damn, Siri, Do You Even Chill With Latinos?

The one from the equal emojis activist…

taco

Seriously, where’s the taco emoji?!

The one from the caring sibling…

chancla

When you see this text you RUUUUUUUUN!

READ: Those Chanclas Aren’t Just Made for Walking

And no one texts more powerful emojis than Paquita…

raton


What are your emoji staples? mitú wants to know.  Leave a comment below!

La Chona Is THAT Hot Girl We Should All Be Trying To Be

Culture

La Chona Is THAT Hot Girl We Should All Be Trying To Be

lostucanesdetijuana.com

Besides our moms, abuelas, tias and comadres, there are so many strong Latina icons like Selena Quintanilla, Frida Kahlo, Celia Cruz, Jenni Rivera and Rita Moreno that we can look up to.

However, we need to give proper credit to another important feminist figure in the Latinx culture.

“La Chona” is one of the original feminist icons of our generation and she needs to get the proper credit she deserves.

Twitter / @bonitaapplewend

“La Chona” is a song from 1995 by Los Tucanes de Tijuana — a norteño band from Tijuana. The fast beat and up-tempo song tells the story of a woman named La Chona. As the song goes, La Chona is a “city girl” who spends her nights out at the clubs dancing and basically living her best life. Think of “Hotline Bling” without Drake.

The lyrics below will help you understand (if you already don’t) why La Chona is an important feminist figure.

“I’ll tell you the story of a famous city girl.
Everybody knows her and La Chona is her name.
Everybody knows her and La Chona is her name.
Her husband is crying, he doesn’t know what to do.
Daily, she is dancing and spending on her booze.
Daily, she is dancing and spending on her booze.
The band has started, they’re playing the first song.
La Chona is ready, ready looking for a boy.
La Chona is ready, ready looking for a boy.
People are watching and they’re all singing aloud.
Bravo, bravo. Chona, about dancing, you’re the one.”

Twitter user @bonitaapplewend wasn’t the only one to declare La Chona one of the original hot girls.

Twitter / @dig_apony

As this tweet says, we stan a strong, confident woman. La Chona is the kind of girl who knows what she wants and isn’t afraid to go after it — no matter what other people think about her choices. She isn’t afraid to leave her toxic husband behind and enjoy herself. We have to appreciate that level of self-confidence.

A thread by @UnTalFredo goes even further into the La Chona lore and is a good read if you want to learn more about the legend.

Twitter / @UnTalFredo

As the thread details, La Chona isn’t the kind of girl to let things happen to her. She’s going to experience life to it’s fullest because she knows that we are all on borrowed time. If she wants to dance, she finds a partner. If she wants to drink, La Chona buys her own bottles — she doesn’t wait for someone else to treat her. She’s an independent woman who doesn’t need a man to make her nights worthwhile.

Not only that but, La Chona is adored and respected by her community and she loves them in return.

Twitter / @UnTalFredo

La Chona isn’t just dancing for her own enjoyment, she’s also doing it for her community. She shows her appreciation for them by doing something that she is generally great at. She doesn’t dance for the ovations but she appreciates the love that she gets from her audience. Considering how important community is to the Latinidad, this exudes big Latina energy. La Chona is like a local celebrity and we’re certain girls in the clubs she dances at dream of becoming as carefree and acclaimed as she is.

La Chona is so important in Latin music lore that she deserves a place in our hearts alongside other legendary music figures.

Twitter / @monitolegoazul

As this tweet suggests, La Chona would be the perfect partner for “Sergio el Bailador.” The song by a Nuevo León group, Bronco, it tells the story of Sergio el Bailador — a handsome dancer that all the girls come to see groove. His noteworthy style and reputation is a perfect match for La Chona. We’re sure she would save him a dance or two but remember, La Chona doesn’t need a man to get her party on.

La Chona would find a home with another legendary dance group, too.

Twitter / @datfoosaul

Named after an indigenous woman who translated for Cortés, La Malinche was a dance trio created in the 1950s by famous dancer José Limón. Their dances were based on the Mexican fiestas that Limón remembered from his childhood. La Malinch was very popular during the ’50s and it could be said they were the ones that paved the way for other expressive dance groups. La Chona would be just the dancer to make this trio troop into a quartet.

We have to give props to La Chona. She lived her life on her own terms, was immortalized in a song and is still being talked about 25 years later. She’s a true feminist icon and we can all benefit from living a little more like La Chona.

A Woman Threw A Lowrider-Themed Party For Her Son’s First Birthday And It’s Just Too Much For Our Hearts

Culture

A Woman Threw A Lowrider-Themed Party For Her Son’s First Birthday And It’s Just Too Much For Our Hearts

When it comes to maintaining and seeing our Latinidad flourish, instilling a sense of pride, excitement, and curiosity in our younger generations is key. Particularly when it comes to the past. One Twitter user’s recent birthday celebrations for her son, emphasized just how much teaching the old to the new is vital.

Way back before Twitter user @whoissd’s son Silas Cash C turned 1 year old, living in Southern California crafted a car style called “lowrider” that expressed pride in their culture and presence in the states. While the brightly painted, lowriding automobiles that were outfitted with special hydraulics that made them bounce up and down saw a peak in the 1970s, they remain a big part of Chicano culture, particularly in Los Angeles.

@whoissd’s son Silas is proving that he’ll be part of a generation that will not let the culture die out recently when he celebrated his first full year with a theme that was little more unique and closer to his family’s hearts.

For her son, Silas Cash’s, first birthday, SD threw an authentic lowrider party — complete with the recognizable cruisers in attendance.

Twitter / @whoissd

On July 27, SD shared pics of the big event with her Twitter followers. The post showed baby Silas Cash cruising in his own pint-sized orange lowrider. The party came complete with several lowriders and classic cars in attendance for party-goers to check out. Since posting the adorable pics on Twitter, the message has received more than 22.5k retweets and over 138k likes.

According to SD, Silas Cash developed a fascination with lowriders because of his dad. In an email to REMEZCLA, the mom explained the connection.

“[My son’s dad] started restoring two cars to continue a bond that he had shared with his own father throughout his childhood and it’s now something that the has been introduced to our son. The lowrider culture represents family, unity, and respect to us. It really is a beautiful thing.”

The one-year old’s mini lowrider had to be specially made in Japan just for his birthday party.

Twitter / @whoissd

Silas Cash’s mom explained the decision to have the tiny lowrider made for her kiddo.

“We originally thought about getting Silas his own lowrider because of the immediate attraction he has to his dad’s Impala. With enough searching, we were able to find someone who custom makes remote-controlled pedal cars, and we were sold… Silas and his dad have matching orange ’63 Impalas with the same candy paint hardtops to match.”

Twitter was quick to react to the simply adorable party and they couldn’t stop gushing over it.

Twitter / @cali_kalypso

As this tweet points out, this party is so authentically LA. Lowrider culture started in the streets of California in the mid-to-late 1940s and the post-war ’50s. Chicano youth would lower their car’s blocks, cut spring coils and alter auto frames in order to get the lowest and slowest ride possible. Back then, this was an act of rebellion against the Anglo authorities who suppressed Mexican-American culture.

This Snoop Dog meme says it all.

Twitter / @marissaa_cruzz

We’ve seen this meme make its rounds on the internet our fair share of times but this time it 100% applies. These pics of Baby Silas Cash and his mama are some of the cutest we’ve ever seen. The added bonus of the mini Impala makes this post almost too cute to handle.

A reminder that this little man is officially the coolest kid on the block.

Twitter / @devyn_the_lame

We can just see Baby Silas Cash pulling up to the playground in this custom low rider peddle cart and being the envy of all the other rugrats. There’s no doubt that he is the most chill kiddo at daycare.

*”Lowrider” plays in the distance*

Twitter / @JGar1105

We’re getting major “The George Lopez Show” flashbacks with all this lowrider talk. Don’t you think Silas Cash needs his own theme song? Obviously, there’s only one that is cool enough for the littlest lowrider.

Other tweets pointed out that it takes a fiercely cool mom to pull off this sort of party.

Twitter / @ismokemaryjuana

We’ve got to respect SD’s mom game. She really took her vision and went for it, resulting in a fun, unique and memorable party that her guests will never forget. Great job, mom; we hope Silas Cash grows up to realize how awesome his parents are.

 

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