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Donald Trump Threatening To Imprison His Political Opponent Should Terrify You

The second presidential debate was a whirlwind. Not only did Donald Trump invite Bill Clinton’s accusers to attend the debate, he even said he would send Hillary Clinton to jail. Send. Her. To. Jail. The threat was over the emails for which the FBI has already cleared her of wrongdoing. Threatening to send your political prisons to jail is not what a democracy is built on. That’s called a dictatorship.

This is the moment Donald Trump threatened to send Hillary Clinton to jail if he wins the presidency.


Clinton: “It’s just awfully good that someone with the temperament of Donald Trump is not in charge of the law of our country.”

Trump: “Because you’d be in jail.”

America: “Wait…what?” ?

People wasted no time calling out the threat to democracy that response is.


Imagine if any other president had threatened to put their political opponents in jail. Their career would be over.

People are not mincing words here: That is dictatorship.


This is truly a weird and incomprehensible time in American politics.

Violent dictatorship at that.

And, FYI, that’s a pretty sensitive topics for Latinos who have experienced or whose families have experienced such regimes.


Speaking of violent dictatorship, here are just five Latin American dictators that arrested their political opponents.

1. Nicaragua’s Anastasio Somoza Debayle


Anastasio Somoza Debayle was one of the infamous Somoza dynasty, started by his father Anastasio Somoza García, that devastated the country of Nicaragua. According to Encyclopedia.com, Somoza Debayle was educated in the United States, graduating from West Point in 1946, under the urging of his father. Upon the completion of his education, he was appointed as a high-ranking official in the Nicaraguan National Guard. Over time, Somoza Debayle was able to use his power to make himself the president of Nicaragua in 1967. Part of Somoza Debayle’s plan to keep total control of Nicaragua hinged on the imprisonment and stripping of power of his political opponents. A rigged election guaranteed him a six-year presidency starting in 1974, which he did not finish. Somoza Debayle was forced to flee from Nicaragua as his government crumbled, eventually being assassinated in Paraguay.

2. Chile’s Augusto Pinochet


Augusto Pinochet was the brutal Chilean dictator who lead a coup against President Salvador Allende in 1973. After toppling the government that had helped him rise politically, Pinochet led the country into great economic growth, according to The New York Times. However, the short gains were marred by the death of more than 3,000 prisoners and the countless thousands more Chileans who went missing, were tortured and were exiled. People who disagreed with Pinochet were the ones jailed and their jailing was used to motivate towns and villages to submit to the military’s rule.

3. Cuba’s Fidel Castro


Fidel Castro rose to power in the 1950s by overthrowing the dictator Fulgencio Batista and set about nationalizing all U.S.-owned business on the island, prompting the embargo. Under Castro, political dissent was treated as treason, with thousands of Cuban being jailed for decades for expressing political ideologies that did not align with Castro’s Cuba. According to History.com, Castro’s government jailed all political dissidents, abolished private businesses and got rid of newspapers that printed stories opposing the Castro regime. According to a personal essay in The Washington Post, Cubans faced prisons sentences for “fidelity of our conscience” for things as small as not having a “I’m with Fidel” sign on desks.

4. Venezuela’s Nicolás Maduro


Nicolás Maduro is the leader of the economically crumbling Venezuela. Maduro has been rejecting any foreign assistance as the world watches the South American country fall apart as food and basic medicine becomes scarce. The governmental system of Venezuela that has led to this severe economic problem was started by Hugo Chavez. Since Maduro’s presidency began, it has gotten worse. According to The New York Times, Chavez had about a dozen political prisoners during his rule and that number has now risen to 100. The New York Times also reports that another 2,000 Venezuelans are still at risk of being imprisoned as political prisoners.

5. Panama’s Manuel Noriega


Manuel Noriega started his rise to power when he helped General Omar Torrijos take control of the Panamanian government in 1968. His loyalty to Torrijos helped for him to gain more notoriety and clout in the National Guard, eventually landing him on the CIA payroll for intelligence. But it wasn’t long until things took a brutal turn, with political opponents being imprisoned and, in one extreme case, decapitated. When Torrijos suddenly died in a plane crash, Noriega took power of Panama and continued to be a brutal dictator. Eventually, Noriega was arrested by U.S. officials for drug trafficking in the U.S.


READ: Here Is Yet Another Example Of Donald Trump Being A Garbage Person

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Federal Investigators Executed A Search Warrant On Rudy Giuliani’s N.Y.C. Home And This Is Just The Beginning

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Federal Investigators Executed A Search Warrant On Rudy Giuliani’s N.Y.C. Home And This Is Just The Beginning

Months of investigations on Donald Trump’s personal attorney Rudy Giuliani officially came to a head Wednesday morning.

The former New York City mayor’s dealings with Ukraine officials in 2019 have been under scrutiny for months by authorities who have been investigating allegations Giuliani lobbied for powerful Ukrainian interests. The investigations have also looked into claims that Giuliani also solicited the Ukrainian government for damaging information on President Joe Biden when he was running against Trump in the 2020 election.

There is also the matter of allegations that Giuliani attempted to find information on Biden’s son Hunter, who was part of the board of an energy company in Ukraine.

Federal investigators executed a search warrant on Rudy Giuliani’s Manhattan home on Wednesday morning.

The search was part of a criminal investigation into Giuliani‘s activities with Ukraine. According to The New York Times, “Prosecutors obtained the search warrants as part of an investigation into whether Mr. Giuliani broke lobbying laws as President Trump’s personal lawyer.”

Federal agents seized cellphones and other electronic devices as part of the investigation. The search warrant took place around 6 a.m. at Mr. Giuliani’s apartment on Madison Avenue and his Park Avenue office in Manhattan.

The execution of a search warrant against the former president’s lawyer is particularly shocking.

The warrant comes as a major development in the investigation that has been ongoing for some time and examines the former- mayor’s conduct during Mr. Trump’s first impeachment trial.

“It was also a remarkable moment in Mr. Giuliani’s long arc as a public figure,” noted New York Times. “As mayor, Mr. Giuliani won national recognition for steering New York through the dark days after the Sept. 11 attacks, and earlier in his career, he led the same U.S. attorney’s office in Manhattan that is investigating him now, earning a reputation as a hard-charging prosecutor who took on organized crime and corrupt politicians.”

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Eva Mendes Sparks Discussion About Spanking After Comparing It To Spousal Abuse

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Eva Mendes Sparks Discussion About Spanking After Comparing It To Spousal Abuse

via Getty Images

Eva Mendes has always been honest about her home life and her ongoing parenting journey. The 47-year-old Cuban-American actress is mother to 6-year-old Esmeralda and 4-year-old Amada with husband, Ryan Gosling.

On Monday, Eva Mendes posted a controversial Instagram post where she compared spanking a child to spousal abuse.

“I’m often asked what my favorite red carpet dress is. This @versace is definitely up there,” she wrote, along with a beautiful picture of her on the red carpet. “I’m not often asked what my favorite parenting quote is, but I’ll post it anyway. Please slide if you care.”

The quote was as follows: “Spanking does for a child’s development what hitting a spouse does for a marriage.” The quote is credited to children’s rights advocate and parenting blogger, Racheous.

Especially in Latino communities where chanclas are a common form of punishment, corporal punishment like spanking is a hot-button topic.

Eva Mendes’s followers quickly took to the comments section to debate over whether they agreed with the spanking comparison.

“That quote is so true. I love how you are so protective of your family and so thoughtful about what you post. It’s refreshing,” wrote one follower.

Another wrote: “Love you but completely disagree. The goal in raising kids is not to have to spank, but it’s correcting before they can reason behavior out with you. Completely different than hitting someone. That’s not correcting behavior. We raised 5 respectful loving kind kids that were a joy to be around. Good fruit shows from loving correction.”

Spanking has long been a controversial topic in parenting circles, and it seems like Eva Mendes touched a nerve with the quote she posted.

Parents–and especially mothers–are extremely sensitive about being judged as “bad” parents. And contrary to laws banning child abuse, there are no laws that ban “spanking” (which is defined by Merriam-Webster as “to strike especially on the buttocks with the open hand”).

Mendes, for her part, was quick to de-escalate the conversations happening on her Instagram page. “I totally respect you. Thank you for a respectful comment,” she wrote to one of the commenters that didn’t like her quote. “So nice to disagree with respect. I found the quote powerful and wanted to pass it on. Lotsa love to you and yours [heart emoji].”

“This didn’t come with a manual,” Mendes wrote. “So when there’s something that resonates with me, I pass it on. Lotsa love [heart emoji].”

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