Entertainment

People Are Losing Their Minds Over Diego Luna’s Accent In The New Stars Wars Movie

The official trailer for “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story” finally dropped. It is some straight up fire.

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The two-minute trailer gave us a closer look at Captain Cassian Andor, a Rebel intelligence officer played by homeboy Diego Luna.

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Credit: Rayfinndameron/Tumblr/Star Wars/ YouTube

More importantly, the new trailer also featured Diego Luna’s natural accent instead of an American accent. This little detail did not go unnoticed by the Internet, and they’re loving every little bit of it.

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In fact, people got straight up emotional about it.

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Some even went so far as to thank Emperor Sheev Palpatine for this wonderful little treat.

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Can you blame them? Luna’s accent is sexy AF that they actually bottle it in his native Mexico and sell it as an aphrodisiac.

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It is truly divine.

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It’s truly wonderful that people are loving that Diego Luna isn’t trying to hide where he’s from. Because when you make Latinxs visible in a galaxy far, far away, you make Latinxs visible here.

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 You’re also giving a whole generation of future Latinxs geeks some badass characters to look up to.

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So shout out to you, Disney, for giving us Poe Dameron, and now Cassian Andor.

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Credit: SuperHeroHype/Star Wars/YouTube

READ: Diego Luna Joins A Long List Of Latinos In Sci-Fi

How excited are you for the new star wars movie? Make sure you tell us in the comments and don’t forget to click that share button!

I Chose The Name Leia When I Transitioned And Meeting Carrie Fisher Is A Moment I Will Never Forget

Culture

I Chose The Name Leia When I Transitioned And Meeting Carrie Fisher Is A Moment I Will Never Forget

Lucas Films / leiacheyanne92 / Instagram

It happened in a galaxy not too far away, meeting interstellar royalty. I was a cashier in a well-known beauty retailer based in the heart of Beverly Hills, California. What started as a trivial shift of organizing lipsticks and rechecking rollerballs became one of the most memorable moments in my life.

I was busy trying to solve the ever-constant mystery of lost pens. Fair to say I wasn’t completely focused on my jobs at hand as I did the meticulous work. I was rather new to Los Angeles and the beauty retail world still learning the ropes.

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It was that in moment a chocolate French bulldog lapped his extra long tongue on my shoes. I bent down laughing, petting him while his tongue spiraled up in between heavy pants. This wasn’t just any pampered pooch off Rodeo Drive, this dog in question was Gary Fisher, the one and only Carrie Fisher’s dog.

Credit: garyfisher / Instagram

This would be a good moment to clear up any confusion. My name is Leia, Carrie Fisher plays a character in the film series, Star Wars, Princess Leia, and Gary Fisher is obviously the full/accepted name of her dog. I wasn’t always named Leia. Up until I was 22, I was Jacob. I’m transgender. Fisher’s Star Wars character Princess Leia was always someone I looked up to. Her strength and fighting spirit are things I could relate to and I wanted to keep her strength with me. My name was now Leia and I was intentionally channeling that strength to guide me.

Credit: leiacheyanne92 / Instagram

So when I looked up to see Carrie Fisher with hundreds of dollars of sheet masks I was speechless. As a kid, I watched this woman run through the Death Star, dodging Stormtroopers braless! These are some of the most vivid memories I have from my childhood. Now it’s key to note, working in Beverly Hills, the easiest way to get fired is by making celebrities feel awkward. Oscar-nominated bad business is frowned upon. While I rang her up all I could mumble about was that her last-minute gold nail polish purchase was the “same shade as C-3PO,” and we smiled. I then saw Carrie’s eyes lock with my name tag and heard her, “Oh my God! Your name!” I nodded. She nodded. We shared a moment of clarity. I was finally acknowledged by Alderaan. Gary, Carrie, and there was I, Leia. It was the same year she passed away, but that particular day two Leia’s met in the middle. The original Princess Leia who inspired my name and taught me what it meant to be a woman had found me, accepted me, and welcomed me into her tribe. You could say it was a little luck or the Force but it’s something I’ll have a long, long time no matter how brief.

Credit: leiacheyanne92 / Instagram

I still work in the beauty industry and getting clients to remember my name comes down to one simple sentence, “Oh, and I’m Leia… like Star Wars.” The whole concept of naming oneself during a transition of gender is daunting. Many transgender/nonbinary identifying people change their name multiple times. My distinction didn’t take much thought. It was my first day in Los Angeles ordering coffee and being asked for my name, “I’m Leia… like Star Wars.” It was easily understood by the majority of the population and thus I became a part of a smile, of a sci-fi connection, of a Carrie Fisher stand up or book prologue. I was suddenly surrounded by the image of a side bunned, hard ass, space princess and if I could leave that in my wake then I knew I could be that much more memorable. Plus, my closest friends already addressed me as Leia at the beginning of my transition so it just made sense. I remember my encounter with Carrie Fisher fondly every year when May The 4th comes around and the power of that moment continues to impact my life.

READ: Why This Transgender Mexicana Picked This Biblical Name

Here’s Your Latino Movie Guide To The Tribeca Film Festival

Entertainment

Here’s Your Latino Movie Guide To The Tribeca Film Festival

@elenagaby_ | @nadiahallgren

We’re so excited for this year’s Tribeca Film Festival. There’s so much going on, and we’re eagerly anticipating all of the Latino films and filmmakers who will be on the big screen in New York City. The festival that takes place April 24 through May 5 features films that take on important issues affecting our community including topics such as immigration and the recovery of Puerto Rico.

The festival will also feature films directed by Latinx directors from around the world. The feature program includes 103 films from 124 filmmakers, and 42 of them are first-time filmmakers. The films also highlight the work of women — 40 percent of the feature films have one or more women directors, and 29 percent of the feature films are directed by people of color, while 13 percent of the feature films are by individuals who identify as LGBTQ.

Aside from films, there are also some exciting panels featuring director Guillermo Del Toro, Queen Latifah, and a special talk on the 25th anniversary of “In Living Color,” which includes creators and actors from the show. Here are a couple of films that caught our eye.

“After Maria,” directed Nadia Hallgren.

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Nadia Hallgren, award-winning filmmaker and cinematographer from the Bronx, will present her documentary short film titled “After Maria.”

The film centers around Puerto Rican women “forced to flee the island after Hurricane Maria have bonded like family in a FEMA hotel in the Bronx. They seek stability in their new life as forces try to pull them apart.” This film will also be released on Netflix.

“I Am Human,” directed by Elena Gaby.

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Elena Gaby, a Brazilian-American filmmaker, and producer, who’s been on the movie radar since she won the Best Student Documentary in 2014 at the Cannes Film Festival, is bringing her feature film “I Am Human.”

According to the festival’s website, the film dives into the question “what it means to be human.” The movie “offers a glimpse of what this technical evolution entails, following three individuals with neurological disorders: one rendered tetraplegic after a bike accident, one battling Parkinson’s Disease, and one with late-onset blindness.”

“The Gasoline Thieves,” directed by Edgar Nieto.

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Mexican director Edgar Nieto presents his first feature film “The Gasoline Thieves” (“Huachicolero”). The film looks at Mexico’s increasing gas shortage and tells the story of Lalo, a 14-year-old, who seeks out to work as a huachicoleros (people who steal gasoline and re-sell it) to get a few bucks to buy a smartphone. The dangerous and illegal job, however, quickly takes over his life.

“Two/One,” directed by Juan Cabral.

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“Narcos” actor Boyd Holbrook stars in the feature film “Two/One” as a ski jumping champion is leading a parallel life with another man, in another country. They are both connected in ways they are unaware of. “While one sleeps, the other is awake. The world waits for an impending moment; They must unite.” This film is directed by Argentine writer and director Juan Cabral.

“Clementine,” starring Otmara Marrero.

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Cuban-American actress Otmara Marrero stars in “Clementine” a feature film that is being described as a psychological drama and sexual coming-of-age story.

Marrero plays Karen a woman looking for a solid relationship. When she breaks into her ex’s house, she meets Lana who instantly lures her in with her charm.

Other Latino films and Latino-directed films include: “Carlito Leaves Forever,” directed by Quentin Lazzarotto; “The Dishwasher,” directed by Nick Hartanto and Sam Roden; “Driving Lessons,” directed by Marziyeh Riahi; “Hard-ish Bodies,” directed by Mike Carreon; “Night Swim,” directed by Victoria Rivera; “La Noria,” directed by Carlos Baena; “PeiXes,” directed by Juan Carlos Pena Babío; “A Tale of Two Kitchens,” directed by Trisha Ziff; “Lady Hater,” directed by Alexandra Barreto; “Initials SG,” by Daniel Garcia; and “This Is Not Berlin,” directed by Hari Sama.

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READ: Miami Film Festival Cancels Screening of Immigration Doc After ICE Detained The Movie’s Main Character

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