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I Thought Rebelde Was My Life, But Instead It Was Taking Over My Life

We all develop random obsessions while growing up. For me, “Rebelde” was that obsession. Somewhere between elementary school and middle school, I became addicted to the telenovela “Rebelde.” And I admit I went a little overboard as a “Rebelde” and RBD fanatic.

The first thing I did when I got home was walk straight to the TV and flip the channel to “Rebelde.” 


Thankfully, it started at 3 p.m. so I had about 15 minutes to hop in my mom’s car, get home and dash to the TV. It was always a fight between me and my mom about whose turn it was to watch their novela. Eventually my family learned not to bother me when I was watching “Rebelde.” It became my me time, my distraction from the world, my meditation. It was just me Roberta, Mia, and the rest of the students at Elite High School. 

I memorized the lyrics to every single RBD song. So as soon as I heard “Y soy Rebelde,” I would be like…

https://twitter.com/kimbe_rubio/status/790362369121628160


“THAT’S MY BAND, YO.” I considered myself the sixth member. Don’t even get me started on the ballads. My single, never-been-kissed-self would cry every time I listened to “Sálvame,” which was always on repeat. No shade to The Beatles, but RBD is music’s greatest band. 

To this day, I still rock RBD merch. 

I still wear Rebelde merch to pay homage to the novela that shaped the crazy 20-something year old that I am now. While everyone else was watching “90210,” I was watching “Rebelde.” This telenovela was a way for me to connect with my culture and my language. I went from being shamed about my accent to singing at the top of my lungs to RBD’s music. RBD helped me reconnect with my culture and to this day, I love RBD for that. 

Shop: Y Soy Rebelde Shirt

Every single RBD CD, you name it, I had it.


Most kids my age spent their money on shoes and clothes, this was where all of my allowances went. I started selling food at my school — I even became known as the Hot-Cheeto plug on campus. I was the cool kid walking around with a walkman wearing plaid everything and my little brother’s tie around my neck. It’s called fashun, look it up. 

I spent money on this hard, flavorless gum!

CREDIT: _SIOUXCI0 / INSTAGRAM

I spent all my money on this gum just to collect the limited edition RBD stickers. Maybe this is what gave me so many cavities, but it was “Rebelde!” The guy at the tiendita en la esquina knew to save those for me. Did I develop TMJ because of this? Yes. Was it worth it? Yes. 

And my sticker collection got bigger and bigger.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BB2X75kockl/


The stickers made me so happy. They were all over my locker, binder and books. But my absolute favorite sticker collection was the collection of jewel stickers I saved so I could wear in the middle of my eyebrows just like Mia Colucci. 

My room was decked out with Rebelde posters.


Because I couldn’t think of anything more colorful to decorate my room with. I had one with the entire group. I had an entire wall dedicated to posters of the guys. My favorite poster was one of young Diego Boneta. I knew since then that we were destined to be together. 

A LOT of posters.


Anyone that entered my room would knew right away that I was sort of, kind of, reeeeeally a fan of “Rebelde.” And I can’t leave out the posters of the girls. I had a massive poster of my queen Mia Colucci, Roberta and even her mom, Alma Rey. 

When it came time for back-to-school shopping, there was no stopping me.

CREDIT: _SIOUXCI0 / INSTAGRAM

I had to have it all. Give me the notebook, the backpack, the pencils. I had a ton of Rebelde t-shirts and still have some today. Also, for breakfast, I would only eat Rebelde-sponsored foods. Did I ever see them actually studying in the show? No. Still, I had to have every product that had their precious faces printed. 

And I was always prepared with my Rebelde swag.


If I wasn’t dressed in plaid with my little brother’s tie, I had to rock every kind of Rebelde merch that was ever made. Bomber jackets with embroidered Rebelde, I had it. Hats, you know it. I even had Rebelde undies that my mom picked up from a random fashion mart. 

Shop: Rebelde Swag

Every time a teacher gave me a sticker, I’d stick it to my forehead because that’s what Mía Colucci did.


I used to walk around with a sticker, big or small, and say things like “Qué difícil es ser yo!” I started flipping my hair every chance I had and I even started acting like a brat calling my dad daddy in an obnoxious way every time I wanted something from him. Mía was my queen and I wanted to be just like her. 

I even insisted on having a “Rebelde” themed birthday party…

CREDIT: ILIANA PEREZ

TBH, this wasn’t that hard to convince my friends. Everything we owned was already red, black and white. We had our outfits ready and we even knew what we were going to play the night of the party — RBD karaoke! 

…which required all of my friends and cousins to dress in “Rebelde” uniforms.

CREDIT: ILIANA PEREZ

As you can see, I wasn’t the only one who was slightly obsessed. My friends and little cousins also had complete outfits. This made for the best #squadgoals photos way before Instagram even existed. I took my birthday theme very seriously. 

“Rebelde” was my life! 


To me, Rebelde was way more than a telenovela or a teen band. It was a connection to my culture. Because of this group of kids, I shared a few more hours with my parents, I started watching TV in Spanish again and I wanted to wear my culture on my sleeve all over again. I wanted to be just like the kids on the show. I started speaking their slang, wearing their clothing. When other kids on campus saw that I was an RBD fan, they gravitated toward me. It was a way for me to connect with the other Latino kids at school. RBD brought us together. 


Shop: Y Soy Rebelde Shirt
Quiz: Which Rebelde Character Are You?

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Music Videos You Need To Watch This Week: RBD, Chesca, Anthony Ramos and More

Latidomusic

Music Videos You Need To Watch This Week: RBD, Chesca, Anthony Ramos and More

Welcome to The Watch List, where we round up the best Latin music videos released in the past week that you need in your life. Check out the list below.

RBD, Christian Chavez – “Tu Amor”

For many years, Christian Chavez has been outspoken about LGBTQ rights, and this time around he took the stage to deliver a speech about love being a universal right: “Faced with a world that is crumbling, how is it possible that there are still people who dare to question the right to love, the right to be yourself.”

Let Christian take you back to a crisp afternoon in 2006 with this beautiful live rendition of “Tu Amor.”

Chesca, Offset, De La Ghetto – “COMO TU (DIRTY)”

Chesca, Offset, and De La Ghetto take you to a futuristic Shibuya for the dirty version of “COMO TU“. The music video is packed with neon lights, dancers, and all three singers performing from rooftops.

Anthony Ramos – “Say Less

Let’s just say the music video speaks for itself. Hamilton actor Anthony Ramos recruited In The Heights co-star Melissa Barrera for this sultry music video. PS: Anthony’s sophomore album is on the way!

AISSA – “GUERRA”

In the words of Aissa: “HAGO MÚSICA AFRICANA EN ESPAÑOL,” and he’s doing a pretty great job at it. The influencer-turned singer/rapper released his new afrobeat single “GUERRA,” which comes accompanied by a music video filmed at the Reina Victoria Theater in Madrid.

Onell Diaz, Farruko – “Incompleto”

Just in time for Semana Santa, Onell Diaz and Farruko open up the music video for “Incompleto” with interview footage of your favorite Reggaeton artists: Anuel AA, Daddy Yankee, Nicky Jam and Arcangel, where all of them talk about how money and fame isn’t enough to fill the void. Farruko sings about feeling incomplete without God in his life.

Bad Milk, Beéle, Ovy On The Drums – “Angelito”

Ovy On The Drums’ protégé Bad Milk is ready to take the music scene with this collab with Beelé. The three Colombian artists make the music video feel like an acoustic session.

Sech – “911 (Acústico)”

Since we’re talking acoustic! As we prepare for the release of his new album ’42’, Sech shows off his vocal ability delivering a beautiful arrangement of his latest reggaeton hit “911.”

Jordy Jill & Mike Bahía – “Darte Amor”

Jordy Jill and Mike Bahía joined forces on their new song “Darte Amor,” which samples Proyecto Uno’s “25 Horas.” The music video takes place in beautiful Cartagena, Colombia and it’s packed with vibrant colors and dance moves.

Lola Indigo, Guaynaa, Cauty – “CALLE”

Spanish singer Lola Indigo recruits Boricua singers Cauty and Guaynaa for “CALLE.” Even though right now we can’t really be en la calle, Lola sets the mood with her dancers as they go on a heist for the music video.

READ: Ozuna Goes Corridos Tumbados With Ovi in “Envidioso” Music Video

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Here’s What We Know So Far About The ‘Rebelde’ Reboot Coming To Netflix

Entertainment

Here’s What We Know So Far About The ‘Rebelde’ Reboot Coming To Netflix

Nostalgia has a way of taking us right back to who we were when we saw and heard some of our favorite things. “Rebelde” is definitely one of the top nostalgic moments in most Latino childhoods. Well, get ready because Netflix is bringing “Rebelde” back so you can dive back into the stories that will forever hold a special place in your heart.

“Rebelde” is coming back and this is definitely not a drill.

After years of being off the air, the historic and iconic show “Rebelde” is back and people cannot wait. The original cast has been good at keeping our love for them alive as they toured and created music. Most recently, RBD, the surviving band of original Rebelde members, dropped a new single to make the pandemic a little more tolerable.

We already know who is reprising their role in the reboot.

Celina Ferrer, played by Estefanía Villarreal, is coming back as the principal of the school. The official announcement letter was signed by the Elite Way School alumna.

“EWS is renowned for the excellence of its illustrious student body, young people ready to dazzle the world. In these halls, we have shaped icons who have gone on to entertain millions with their talent, and our classrooms have turned students into stars, ready for the big stage,” reads the letter. “Today, our Board of Directors is proud to present the next generation of young people who will become part of our prestigious institution in the upcoming 2022 school year. We welcome our future students Azul Guatia, Sergio Mayer Mori, Andrea Chaparro, Jeronimo Cantillo, Franco Masini, Lixeth Selene, Alejandro Puente, and Giovanna Grigio, who have been selected from an impressive list of applicants. The new students will start wearing the EWS uniform during orientation, which will start on March 1 of this year, thus preparing themselves for the upcoming 2022 school year at this institution, always committed to educating the leaders of tomorrow.”

Here’s a quick look at the new class.

Azul Guaita

Guaita is best known for her impressive TikTok account. She also starred in telenovelas ‘Mi marrido tiene familia” and “Soltero con hijas.” The 19-year-old Mexican actress has garnered more than 2 million followers on TikTok.

Sergio Mayer Mori

Mayer Mori is son of Mexican actor and producer Sergio Mayer and Uruguayan-born Mexican actress, model, producer and writer Bárbara Mori Ochoa. The young actor was in “Un padre no tan padre” in 2016.

Andrea Chaparro

Andrea is the daughter of famed Mexican actor Omar Chapparo. Hopefully the actress brings her unapologetic grunge vibes to the set in her role.

Jeronimo Cantillo

Cantillo is best known for his role in Verdad Oculta and Los Morales as well as his reggaeton music. The actor is bringing his award nominated acting chops and musical stylings to the highly anticipated Netflix reboot.

Franco Masini

Masini is one of the biggest names attached to the new “Rebelde” reboot. With several projects under his belt and more than 1 million Instagram followers, Masini is definitely bringing a large following to the Netflix show.

Lizeth Selene

Selene has made a name for herself as a musician and model. It is pretty impressive that her first acting job is going to be as part of the newest Rebelde class.

Alejandro Puente

Puente is an actor, writer, and director with a lot of success in Mexico. He is best known for his role as Todd Anderson in the Mexican stage adaptation of “Dead Poets Society.” He also stars in “El Club,” a crime drama television show in Mexico.

Giovanna Grigio

Grigio comes to the Elite Way School with 6 million Instagram followers and a lot of experience. The Brazilian actress has starred in several television shows and movies and will definitely bring some strong talent to the show.

READ: RBD Is Back With A New Single And This Is Not A Drill

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