Culture

This is How Latinos React When You Compare their Heart to Mexican Candy

Earlier this week, mitú posted this meme on Facebook (follow us!):

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Sweet, right? ?

Plenty of people agreed.

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Others took a moment to reflect.

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She wasn’t the only one…

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READ: #GrowingUpHispanic Means VapoRub, Walter Mercado, Chanclas, and So Much Cleaning

Most people kept their sense of humor about it, though.

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This guy became very poetic…

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But this guy wasn’t having it.

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A few people sent it to their significant others…

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And others sent it to friends.

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READ: Proof that @latinaprobs Understands Your Struggle More than Anyone Else

Some were grateful to have a new line to use at the club…

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While others chimed in with tips:

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This guy even provided evidence of his delicate touch.

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Wow, two unbroken mazapanes? Kenji, you’re the real MVP.

Have you ever been able to open a mazapan candy without breaking it? Let us know in the comments below. 

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Millennials Are Replacing Engagement Rings With Diamonds Pierced Into Their Fingers

Things That Matter

Millennials Are Replacing Engagement Rings With Diamonds Pierced Into Their Fingers

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The centuries-old tradition of proposing with an engagement ring is facing a new challenger. Because if Instagram is anything to go by, engagement finger piercings are now a thing. Yup, some people are now choosing to declare their eternal love for each other with a diamond piercing instead of an actual ring. Here’s how it works.

Dermal piercings are the latest trend replacing engagement rings.

Getting your ears pierced (probably in the window of Claires, with your friends surrounding you) is a rite of passage for most 13-year-olds. But this isn’t that kind of piercing. It’s called a dermal piercing or (to those in the medical profession) a transdermal implant. It’s hardcore and when done right can look pretty cool.

Also known as microdermals, anchors, dermal anchors, and single-point piercings.

They refer to any piercing that lies on a flat surface of the body – in this case, the finger – and is held in place with an ‘anchor’ that is implanted beneath the skin. Ouch. The jewelry then sits on the surface of the skin, making it look like there are gems or beads on the body.

How Does a Dermal Piercing Work?

PSA to all weak-stomached readers: skip this paragraph. First, a qualified technician will sterilize the area and then use either a dermal punch on to remove a small tube of flesh, or a needle to make an L-shaped pouch, then, using dermal forceps, an anchor with either a footed or round base is inserted into the area.

How long does a dermal piercing last?

While you might not get a choice about what type of dermal base is used, there are several variations. Some are punctured with holes so that the tissue can grow in and around the piercing while others have pivoting feet that keep the piercing in place over time – FYI this is V. important as these little accessories have a habit of migrating and rejecting over time (if this happens to you speak to your piercer STAT as a displaced piercing can be fixed as long as you act fast!).

So why are people opting for piercings?

One reason might be cost: tAccording to recent surveys, most American couples expect to spend between $1,000 and $5,000 on an engagement ring, while dermals come in at around $70.

But there are lots of potential complications.

A dermatological expert told the BBC, “If the piercing is not deep enough there is a risk of it moving, known as migration. If it is too deep the skin begins to grow over the piercing, known as embedding. Other risks include inflammation, scarring and infection – particularly if it is on the hands, as is the case with these particular piercings.” They also point out that, “Another problem with having a dermal piercing on your hand is the increased likelihood of it catching on something.”

… Let’s just take a second for that to sink in.

If the mere thought of your ring piercing catching on your clothes or hair isn’t enough to put you off, some piercing studios have said they won’t do dermal piercings on people’s fingers, for that very reason. So if you’re thinking of getting a finger piercing, keep in mind that it will hurt, it could migrate, embed itself, or get infected, and you may accidentally rip your finger skin off while putting on a sweater —all in the name of love. You have been warned.

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Two Sisters Wanted To Share Their Mexican Culture With Everyone So They Started Donas, A Mexican-Themed Donut Shop

Culture

Two Sisters Wanted To Share Their Mexican Culture With Everyone So They Started Donas, A Mexican-Themed Donut Shop

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Foodies are flying in from as far away as Atlanta to get a taste of Southern California-based Donas, a pastel-hued wonderland of donuts showcasing the fusion of Mexican-American culture. Not only are the flavors and names nostalgic shout outs for Mexican-Americans, they use glitter to make their donuts very Instagram worthy.

Donut fans are in for a treat at Latino donut shop Donas. You can try horchata or mole donuts or take a bite out of a Selena-inspired dessert.

Owners Ashley and David Vazquez, along with Ashley’s younger sister Amber Bobadilla, have been able to turn a profit bringing the flavors they grew up eating to a wider sweet-toothed audience.

The sister duo and brother-in-law started churro and coffee shop Horchateria Rio Luna in 2016 and launched Donas in October last year.

“We want to show people, look, this is our culture and these are our flavors and what our people have to offer,” Bobadilla said.

When David asked Bobadilla if she wanted to help in turning his idea of opening a donut shop into a brick-and-mortar reality, she was all in.

“It’s beautiful and delicious,” Bobadilla said.

The name is a play on how all of our parents and grandparents say donuts.

“Everyone who speaks Spanish knows it,” Bobadilla said, adding that the Latino, Spanish-speaking community finds the name funny.

Besides the name, everything from the decor to the flavor concepts is all Bobadilla.

With no prior baking experience, she hired a baker to bring her donut creations to life. The results included fresh takes on childhood treats such as the paleta payaso donut, made with marshmallows and chocolate.

Bobadilla knew the she wanted to put glitter on a donut. Of course, once she found the sparkling purple edible glitter, she couldn’t resist.

Bobadilla just knew that she had found the special ingredient to create her Bidi Bidi Bom Bom donut. Plus, it makes for great photos.

Agua de horchata, crushed mazapan and coconut flakes are nestled next to strawberries, raisins and oats all help create the various Mexican concoctions.

She describes it as taking “flavors that transport you to your childhood and put it into a donut.”

One of the fan favorites is a donut she envisioned while watching her favorite guilty pleasure TV show and eating chicharrón (fried pork rinds.)

Bobadilla originally brought the idea to her family but was told it would be “gross.” She pushed the initial skepticism aside and said she believed it was going to work, and Donas customers agreed. It is one of the shop’s best selling donuts, according to Bobadilla.

Bobadilla’s resolve has been integral as an entrepreneur. She and her sister tried out various businesses landing on Horchateria and Donas.

“Donas is still a work-in-progress now. We want it to look amazing and be Instagram-worthy. ” And people are definitely coming in for those Insta Stories and #foodie finds.

Bobadilla also specially crafted the interior of her donut shop to enhance the experience for donut lovers.

She said she wanted the pastels to help make the shop stand out and be cute. The team is still experimenting with design, including painting an ice cream mural on its outer walls.

But the most important thing for Bobadilla is to inspire her community.

“The bigger mission is showing people from our communities, when you really put your mind to it and have a passion, [this is] what can come.”

Donas’ donuts range from $2.50 to $5.00 for specialty donuts and is located at 8636 Imperial Hwy in Downey, California.


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