identity

Coming Out As Gay in Latino Culture is the Scariest and Most Rewarding Thing You Can Do

National Coming Out Day


Being gay in Latino culture is tough and trying and coming out can be the most terrifying thing a person can do.


READ: How I Came Out to My Family at a Family Reunion in Mexico


Here are five stories from brave Latinos and Latinas that came out to their families.  Their stories start with hurt and pain and eventually transform to joy and being able to live.  Their stories remind everyone to have faith, strength, and remember, #YouAreNotAlone.


For those considering coming out, there are resources, including  The Trevor ProjectHRC’s National Coming Out Day and GLAAD.org. You are not alone.


READ: How I Came Out to My Family at a Family Reunion in Mexico


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The LGBTQ+ Flag Just Got Updated And Its Generating Mixed Responses

Things That Matter

The LGBTQ+ Flag Just Got Updated And Its Generating Mixed Responses

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To kick off Pride Month, Philadelphia unveiled a new look to the iconic LGBTQ+ Rainbow flag.

In recognition of Pride Month, the city of Philadelphia raised this new updated LGBTQ+ flag in front of the Philly’s City Hall. This new flag comes as part of the city’s campaign, “More Color More Pride” which is taking action toward becoming more inclusive of minorities.

The already colorful flag got new black and brown stripes to speak to minorities.

The original flag, which was created almost 40 years ago by Gilbert Baker, went on to become the biggest trademark for the LGBTQ+ community.

Ernest Owens, journalist and Philly resident says, “The black and brown stripes are an inclusionary way to highlight black and brown LGBTQIA members within our community,” Owens writes in Philadelphia magazine. “With all of the black and brown activism that’s worked to address racism in the Gayborhood over the past year, I think the new flag is a great step for the city to show the world that they’re working toward fully supporting all members of our community.”

The addition of the two new colors to the pride flag, not only falls during Pride Month, but also in the same week as the anniversary of the Pulse massacre.

The shooting in Orlando, Florida, in which a lone gunman killed 49 people and wounded more than 50. Many of those were gay minorities.

Some people are really digging the inclusivity of the two new hues.

? Proud that my backpack's latest piece of flair is the expanded LGBTQ flag! #MoreColorMorePride #Pride2017

A post shared by Josh Kruger (@joshkrugerphl) on


While others don’t think it was necessary.

The site for Philadelphia’s campaign, “More Color More Pride,” states that this expansion “may seem like a small step. But together we can make big strides toward a truly inclusive community.” Learn more here:


READ: Coming Out As Gay in Latino Culture is the Scariest and Most Rewarding Thing You Can Do

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How Gay Weddings And Honeymoons Could Be The Answer To Puerto Rico’s Problems

Things That Matter

How Gay Weddings And Honeymoons Could Be The Answer To Puerto Rico’s Problems

Credit: iStock

La Isla del Encanto, or Puerto Rico as most of us know it, is going through a crippling financial crisis thanks to a $70 billion debt. The solution? Some are banking on gay tourism. Yup.

Lee Hall, who got engaged to his boyfriend on the island, says, “Everyone here, that I’ve experienced, is very gay friendly, gay accepting.” Unlike other islands in the Caribbean that traditionally follow the conservative rulings of the British, Puerto Rico abides by the same gay laws in the U.S. This means that being gay won’t land you a life sentence like it does in Barbados or in a mental asylum like in Dominica — a huge advantage for any openly gay people who want to travel to the Caribbean.

READ: Mexican Soccer Player Says He’s Not Gay, But if He Was, You Shouldn’t Care

Cecilia de la Luz, a gay activist, has been fighting for gay rights for more than 40 years, and advocates for gay rights on the island because it will improve the quality of life for everyone, not just gay people.

“There’s a connection between more rights for gay people in Puerto Rico and have more impact in regards to gay tourism on the island and that will have a domino effect in regards to improve the economy,” she says.

To no one’s surprise, 90 percent of the tourism on the island comes from the U.S. and of that percentage, gay honeymooners spend a lot more money than their straight counterparts. Ingrid Rivera, executive director of the Puerto Rico Tourism Company says that the island is a great wedding destination. Because of this, the government is pushing U.S. airlines to have more direct flights to the island and even has commercials geared towards the gay community. Although there are no hard numbers in terms of how much gay tourism can generate for the island, Rivera estimates it at 350 to 500 million.

Tropical island gay weddings and debt reduction? Boom. It’s a #winwin.

Listen to more details about gay tourism in Puerto Rico from NPR’s Latino USA here.

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