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9 Reasons Why Teresa Was A Financial Genius

Credit: @ridaboyer / Instagram

Say what you want about Teresa, but that girl knew how to save her pretty pennies. Yeah, she might’ve destroyed a couple lives in the process, but her 401k was looking bright. We can’t hate on her hustle.

Here’s How To Save Money 101 with Teresa Chavez:

1. Don’t leave it all to faith, get an education and work hard.

La #1 ?? #teresa #seronoseryosoy

A video posted by Teresa Chávez ?? (@teresachavez_aguirre) on


That way you can use fancy words when you take over peoples’ businesses. Genius.

2. Dress for the job you want, not the job you have.

diosa

Is it comfortable? No. Do you look like the bad b*tch that you are? Hell yes.

3. When it comes to making business (or anything else), don’t let your emotions get the best of you.

Tengo que dominar mis sentimientos, porque entre ser o no ser Yo Soy #Teresa #seronoseryosoy

A video posted by Teresa Chávez ?? (@teresachavez_aguirre) on


Why blow up on someone when you can instead put together a master plan to destroy their lives and take their fortune five years later. Believe me, totally worth the wait. Think of it as an investment.

4. Don’t blow your money on silly things like vacations.


Instead, have other people pay for them. They get extra miles, you get a free trip. It’s a win-win for both of you.

5. Save money on rent.

La vida que me merezco ? #seronoseryosoy #teresa

A video posted by Teresa Chávez ?? (@teresachavez_aguirre) on


Preferably by staying at other peoples’ homes.

6. Don’t spend money on Ubers or Lyfts.

screen-shot-2016-11-24-at-4-51-00-pm

Ride around in your teacher/boss/boyfriend’s car instead.

7. Plan for the future.

Que tonto ?? #seronoseryosoy #teresa

A video posted by Teresa Chávez ?? (@teresachavez_aguirre) on


If that means hiding your ring so your boyfriend gets you another one so you can one of them, do that.

8. Never lose sight of your goal.

Rica y poderosa ??? #seronoseryosoy #teresa

A video posted by Teresa Chávez ?? (@teresachavez_aguirre) on


Don’t settle. There’s always something bigger out there.

9. Don’t make purchases you don’t need and recycle your old items.

Si le dejé al Novio, porqué no le voy a dejar el vestido? ?? #seronoseryosoy #teresa #esahembraesmala #angeliqueboyer

A video posted by Teresa Chávez ?? (@teresachavez_aguirre) on


By giving your amigas your old clothes and old boyfriends.

Thank you Teresa, for giving us financial stability.


READ: On A Scale Of 1 To Teresa, How Much Of A Bad Bitch Are You?

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The Peso Plummets After Mexico’s Finance Minister Quits And Calls Out Corruption In AMLO’s Government

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The Peso Plummets After Mexico’s Finance Minister Quits And Calls Out Corruption In AMLO’s Government

LocalBusPod / Twitter

Mexico’s peso has taken a hit in value after the country’s finance minister decided to quit his job over disagreements with the president.

The decision by a top adviser to the Mexican president to resign while denouncing conflicts of interest in the government stunned the nation and its financial markets.

After news broke that the finance minister was resigning, the Mexican Peso lost a lot of value.

Credit: @CNBCNow / Twitter

Finance Minister Carlos Urzua’s abrupt decision to quit on Tuesday was the first major cabinet loss since Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador took office in December. The scorching tone of his resignation letter, from a public official known for extreme politeness and addressed to a president who made fighting corruption his central campaign issue, made the departure all the more surprising.

The unexpected departure of Carlos Urzua seven months into Lopez Obrador’s presidency sent stocks and the peso plunging and renewed worries among investors still wary after the president’s cancellation of a $13-billion airport project that was underway outside Mexico City.

In his resignation letter, Urzua called out corruption and conflicts of interest inside the government.

Credit: @CarlosM_Urzua / Twitter

“I’m convinced economic policy should be based on evidence, considering the various effects it may have and free from all extremism, whether from the right or left,” Urzua wrote in the letter posted on his Twitter account, adding that decisions by Lopez Obrador’s government on matters of public administration have lacked foundation. “However, during my term, these convictions weren’t shared.”

His tweet already has more than 25,000 retweets and nearly 7,000 comments.

By midday, the peso had fallen over 2% against the US dollar – a major slide for a currency considered to be quite healthy.

Credit: @LocalBusPod / Twitter

Within an hour, AMLO, as the leftist leader is known, nominated Arturo Herrera, Urzua’s deputy, to replace him. That helped to limit a tumble in the peso, which fell 1.2% at 3:23 pm local time, stopping losses of as much as 2.3% that had followed the publication of Urzua’s letter. The nation’s main stock index fell as much as 2%.

Markets are worried because according to many sources, Urzua was seen as the most responsible official at the finance ministry.

Credit: @GMonroyEnergy / Twitter

Many have admitted that it was not a secret that there were disagreements within AMLO’s government over economic policy.

Urzua had publicly opposed a law proposed by Lopez Obrador’s Morena party to reduce bank fees. He also opposed a proposal that the government dip into central bank reserves to fund infrastructure plans.

Some bickering is to be expected with any government, according to Coutiño, “there should be a consensus in terms of what the administration wants to do in the country.”

And the news simply shocked many, since Urzua had been one of AMLO’s most vocal allies and supporters.

Urzua has been a long-standing ally of Lopez Obrador, having been his finance secretary when AMLO was mayor of Mexico City at the start of the last decade. Herrera is also a former finance minister of AMLO’s in the nation’s capital.

READ: Protests In Mexico Over Increasing Gas Prices Turned Violent

Latina Financial Planner Brittney Castro Helps Women With Their Money Moves

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Latina Financial Planner Brittney Castro Helps Women With Their Money Moves

Courtesy of Brittney Castro

For a long time, finance was considered a boys’ club that only allowed old, grey-haired men in. But for women who largely head households and outlive men, monetary savvy is a necessity we can no longer afford to pass over. In Los Angeles, financial planner Brittney Castro, CFP®, is ensuring that women of all walks of life have the money wits they need and deserve.

At Financially Wise, Inc., the boutique financial planning firm Castro founded in 2013, the biracial Mexican-American offers holistic and comprehensive financial and investment planning for individuals, couples and businesses, with a special aim for women to get their money right. 

“A big thing for me, in the beginning, was to make [financial advice] more accessible, not just for high-network clients. Everyone needs a financial plan to pay for life and goals,” Castro, who says she speaks with clients as if they were friends, in a “fun, personal, compassionate, relatable and nonjudgmental way,” told FIERCE.

In addition to her fee-only financial planning, the 35-year-old CEO also provides online money courses, financial wellness workshops, speaking engagements and brand partnerships. 

Unlike many others in her field, Castro wasn’t raised by entrepreneurial parents, so she understands firsthand how intimidating finances can be. In fact, she entered the industry because she wanted to help communities like her own, everyday people with finance fears, all while being her own boss and making a lofty income herself.

Starting in the corporate world, she loved the change she was making in people’s lives: educating them, helping build confidence in themselves and their pursuits as well as co-creating futures where clients weren’t just secure but thriving.

Still, the long workdays and benevolent sexism of the industry took its toll on the young career woman.

“I stuck out like a sore thumb, which used to bother me a lot,” she said. “There have been so many times in my career when I was talked down to or judged.”

After five years working for a large company, Castro decided to quit and enter independent financial planning, where she’d have more control over her hours and less interaction with condescending bros. 

At the time, blogs were in bloom and social media was on the come-up, and Castro, knowing the troubles of being a woman in money, saw a niche that wasn’t being targeted: women. She started writing and speaking publicly about gender and capital, quickly seeing the benefits of the identities she was previously made to feel insecure about.

“I now think it’s an advantage that I’m a woman, Latina, young and in finance,” said Castro, whose insight on the topic can be found in outlets like Entrepreneur, CNN, CNBC, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Glamour, Elle, Marie Claire and more. “People need me. This is America. I’m the new face, the new generation, so now I see it as a strength.”

Her biggest goal is to demystify finance so that it’s approachable for everyday people who fear all things dinero, and that typically comprises women, especially women of color. This demographic, Castro says, often feels unseen and unheard, and she doesn’t want to perpetuate those feelings and experiences in her office. Knowing the fears, insecurities and emotions that come with money talk, she creates a space where women feel safe to open up.

Courtesy of Brittney Castro

“It’s never just money — it’s our lives, our fears, our wants. So it’s important for me to give women another place to come to where they can feel heard and get the help they want and deserve,” she said.

Once she and her client work through the sentimental blockages, she then breaks down why it’s totally essential for women, especially, to be financially literate and in control of their coins: We live longer than men. Nine of 10 women will be in charge of their finances at some point in their lives. We still earn less than men. We lose income when taking care of children and elders. And the list, she says, goes on.

“There are a lot of challenges, which makes learning about money more necessary,” Castro contends. “While current women’s movements are helping, by making it easier for us or creating more awareness around issues we experience, we, as individuals, still need to decide to dive in and make decisions on our finances.”

For those who are interested but don’t know where to begin or feel like they don’t have the time or cash flow to get started, Castro urges to be abandon self-doubt and just embark on the journey.

To start, Castro offers a few beginner steps.

Know your budget.

This includes all the money coming in and going out of your bank accounts.

Consider how your current budget is working. This will help you spot if you are running short and allow you to identify areas where you might be wasting money that you could actually be saving. “Maybe you need to make more or cut back, but you have to find a way to save money. We all do. But you have to start with your budget,” she said.

Set up automatic systems that will save you money.

There are a few ways to do this. Paychecks that are made via direct deposit, for instance, can automatically go into different accounts, including savings, 401(k)s, investments, employee stock purchase plans and health savings. Automating recurring bills as well as putting credit cards on autopay could also help.

“It’s almost impossible to save money if you have no automatic system that is taking money out of your account. It’s torture to do it any other way. If you see it, you will spend it. Just to be safe, set up an automatic savings plan,” she says.

Learn how to invest.

Learn the language, don’t take risks that will lose you money and expect it to be a lifelong, ever-changing journey.

Whether through a class or a book, educate yourself on investment, in the stock market and in real estate.

“I’ve been doing this for 13 years, and I still learn something new all the time,” she said. “Things change. Technology changes. Products change. There are investments that are right for you and then something comes that’s better, so you have to be willing to make a change.”

Be gentle, yet assertive with your financial goals.

Castro emphasizes that it takes courage, willpower and commitment to follow through on your strategy, which isn’t always easy to maintain.

To help, Castro recommends finding a trusted partner who can help you stay accountable and on track. “Stay motivated and hang in there,” she says. “You’re never alone. We all have the same money goals and challenges, so it’s nice to find somebody you trust that can go through this financial journey with you.”

Once we start paying closer attention to our money and making healthier financial decisions, Castro affirms that we will begin seeing benefits in other aspects of our lives. Think about it: when we aren’t stressing about money, we can think more clearly and spend more of our time enjoying life and those around us. It’s a win all around, and it’s one that is in our hands.

“People fear finances, but it’s actually so empowering when you have it in order,” she says.

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