Culture

50 Thoughts That Run Through Your Head When You Search “Latinas” Online

OK, let’s begin.

1. Ok, “Latinas in STEM” is a nice start to this little adventure. Good job, internet!


Screen Shot 2016-05-09 at 10.42.04 AM

2. Pfft. What as I so worried about?

3. Now let’s try searching “Latina women.” The top promoted result for that one is…  “gorgeous women.”

4. Which, true. We are gorgeous.

5. Oh, wait. It’s an ad…

6. …For Latina mail-order brides?!


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7. No thanks.

8. We like our pollo delivered, not our people.

9. Let’s check Google Images and see what’s going on there…

10. Many gorgeous ladies!

11. (I mean, like I said before: Duh. We’re all gorgeous.)

12. But why does Google think all Latinas come in one skin tone?

13. Luckily, the Google Image section is also filled with educational facts:


CREDIT: whisper.sh / google

Credit: Whisper / Google

14. Ok, I’m done with Google Images. Let’s try Tumblr.

15. Ok, well. I see an issue with grammar, for one.


tumblr
Credit: Tumblr / mitú

16. And that poor girl lost her bikini top. La pobre.

17. Oh, there’s some diversity. Thanks, I guess?

18. Ok, I think we get it, Tumblr. Now let’s check Instagram.

19. So Instagram really wants you to be aware that Latinas do, in fact, have mammary glands. Got it!


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Credit: Instagram

20. Oh, and plenty of memes about Latinas being psycho girlfriends.

21. Like I-will-kill-your-ass-level psycho.

22. A lot of memes about dudes wanting to, yet being scared to, date us.

23. For the record, some of us are just single because we’re REALLY busy.

24 And some of us are single because some men (#notalldudes, I know, I know) can be pendejos.

25. And some of us – gasp!– don’t date men!

26. Do you think the internet knows that? Because I don’t think so.

27. Wait, did I mention the internet thinks we’re crazy violent?

28. Like the sheer amount of “crazy Latina girlfriend” memes is kinda ridic.

29. Oh, and even though we hail from upwards of 20 completely different countries, we can be narrowed down usually to 2 segments:


Which one of these is your girlfriend? Tag your latina here. ? ??

A photo posted by @meetbraziliangirls on

AOC’s Quote About Being The Only Daughter In A Latino Household Is Getting Latinas Fired Up

Fierce

AOC’s Quote About Being The Only Daughter In A Latino Household Is Getting Latinas Fired Up

Brittany Greeson / Getty

As young Latinos, there’s no denying the fact that learning to fold our family culture into the customs we acquire as Americans can shape our abilities to handle pressure. In the process of assimilation, we learn how to meet the demands of our parents and our peers all the while juggling the everyday expectations we shoulder while in school.

Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez knows all about managing these expectations. Last year, while addressing the media’s desire to see her pursue her career and fulfill societal expectations of her personal life (AKA get married) the politician reminded her followers that she can handle pressure because she grew up in a Latino household.

To boot, she was the only daughter in her home.

But what about the rest of us?

Those of us who maybe aren’t quite yet thriving politicians but manage to succeed in our everyday lives and do it all? We asked Latinas on FIERCE about how they’re able to relate to AOC’s comments and the responses were not only enlightening but a good reminder of Latina strength.

“And the oldest for that matter!! You not only learn to be tough, but also to be resourceful and amazingly great at delegating.” – emramirez1

“So true ughh the oldest child the only female and the first American born and the first to go to college oyeeeee the PRESSURE #mujerfuerte AINT NO ONE CAN TAKE ME DOWN lol por que our familia made us strong!” –paulinacastrellon

“Or the OLDEST daughter.” –m0zz_

“And be a food server for many years…” –kimoti_87

“Only daughter and only child! Thats some other level of #latinohousehold.” –wellnessparalamama

“Or a daughter in a Latino household with a strict father period!” –elliev03

“Look i went through allot and none of it made me stronger im a very shaky person theres a difference between trauma and tough love , i think she had tough love trauama fucks u up.” –__head___in___the____clouds__

“Oldest daughter, of 3 girls! You are the example!” – _cynnrenee

“I only wish the means to becoming tough and handle pressure for a Latina daughter didn’t root in traumatic machismo (male chauvinism) and systematic inequalities experiences. Surely there are ways to learn to have an affirmative tone and handle pressure without the trauma.” – marimukkii

“Or just being in a Latina household, period.” –mar_knut

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Yalitza Aparicio Says She’s Waiting For A Role That Won’t Pigeonhole ‘Because of Appearance”

Entertainment

Yalitza Aparicio Says She’s Waiting For A Role That Won’t Pigeonhole ‘Because of Appearance”

Dimitrios Kambouris / Getty

Since the start of her acting career, Oaxacan actress Yalitza Aparicio has been sure to see that her work helps uphold her community. While many actors on the rise tend to focus on racking up more acting roles and fame, Aparicio has been much more vocal about her desire to focus on her advocacy and work for organizations like Cine Too. What’s more, ensuring that she secures proper representation for Indigenous people like herself.

While Aparicio first made headlines and won our hearts with her performance in the 2018 film Roma the Indigenous actress has yet to appear in another role on screen.

It turns out, it isn’t for a lack of offers.

Speaking with Indie Wire about her career, Aparicio has said that she is taking her time to find a role that properly represents her and her community.

“My objective in my career is to give visibility to all of us who have been kept in the dark for so long,” Aparicio claimed in a recent interview with IndieWire. “The acting projects I’m working on are moving slowly because I’m putting all my efforts in not being pigeonholed because of my appearance.”

Aparicio, who is 26-years-old, was born in Tlaxiaco, Oaxaca, rocketed to fame when she took on the role of Cleo in Alfonso Cuarón’s 2018 movie Roma. The film, which was nominated for various Academy Awards followed Aparicio as Cleo a housekeeper who works in a wealthy household in Mexico City’s Colonia Roma. Aparicio’s role brought her praise not just for her skills but for her role in solidifying a much-needed portrayal of Mexico’s Indigenous community.

Still, despite the praise and fame, the role brought her, Aparicio is adamant that her next role will be something greater.

“I come from a community where there’s no movie theater, and as a consequence, the population — especially the children that grow up in those communities — has less of an interest in the cinematic arts. [Cine Too] has the possibility to reach these children and provide an opportunity to instill in them the passion for cinema and teach them about this art form,” she explained in her interview. “I’m conscious that every step I take may open doors for someone else and at the same time it’s an opportunity for society to realize we are part of it and that we are here,”

In her interview, Aparicio points out that while she is very aware that Indigenous filmmakers and allies “have a complicated job because these things can’t be changed overnight,” she is still pushing for real change.

“Wherever I go, I’ll always be proudly representing our Indigenous communities,” she asserted. “We can show people that the only limits are within us.”

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com