#mitúvoice

13 Ways To Clap Back To The Stupidest Thing Latinas Hear Too Often

Credit: Mean Girls / CW

This is one of the most annoying / stereotypical / frustrating / offensive / wtf phrases a Latina can hear. Here are 13 smart responses para callar those stereotypical comments.

1. Are you for real?

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People do deserve the benefit of the doubt.

2. WOW.

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The initial shock leaves you speechless.

3. Tell yourself to be chill.

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Often times ignorance is best fought with silence. It’s not really your job to teach people the difference between race and culture.

4. Pull up a map…

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A history book, and a ton of paciencia.

5. Ríete.

You can listen to stupid comments and make them feel stupid by convincing them they told a joke.

6. Give them the killer look.

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All it takes is one look to cut through the heart. We got it from our mamá.

7. Give them the ‘bye Felicia’ treatment.

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Their lack of respect doesn’t deserve your time.

8. Try hard not to laugh.

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Te entendemos, someone’s trying to tell you you don’t look like… the very thing you are?

9. Prepare for battle.

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If after your history lesson, your fictitious joke and even your killer look, they still don’t get it, you get ready for phase two.

10. Reza por su alma.

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And hope they learn to use Google soon.

11. Get real because this IS what a Latina looks like.

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12. And this.

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13. Even this.

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So sorry to kill your J.Lo fantasy, but we come in all shades and this doesn’t make us any less Latina.

READ: 15 Times Telenovelas Had The Best Responses To Everyday Life

Click the share button below if you’ve heard ‘but you don’t look Latina’ more than once. 

These Two Indigenous Ballers From Mexico Ran The Boston Marathon In Huaraches

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These Two Indigenous Ballers From Mexico Ran The Boston Marathon In Huaraches

Run MX/Facebook

On Monday, more than 30,000 people ran the Boston Marathon.

Credit: @philip_zein_yoga_trx/Instagram

The event is the oldest and one of the most prestigious modern-day 26.2 mile races in the world.

Among the runners were Arnulfo Quimare and Irma Chavez Cruz, members of the Tarahumara.

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Credit: Run MX/Facebook

The Tarahumara are an indigenous people that live in northwestern Mexico, near and around the Sierra Madre Occidental mountain range. The Tarahumara were one of the few indigenous tribes that not only avoided being conquered by Aztecs, but also survived Spanish colonization.

The Tarahumara are known for their long distance prowess.

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Credit: Run MX/Facebook

In their indigenous language of Ralámuli ra’ícha, their word for Tarahumara is”Rarámuri,” which translates to “those who run fast.” Running is a way of life for the Tarahumara. They are known to run upwards of 200 miles per session and incorporate it into their hunting. The Tarahumara literally run their prey to death

This ability to run for what seems forever has been the subject of academic research. Their style of running has also caught the attention of running enthusiasts, and their style of running has proven that human beings are more than physically capable of going the distance.

Arnulfo Quimare is also kind of a legend in the running world. He was prominently featured in Christopher McDougall’s book “Born To Run,” one of the first texts to explore the Tarahumara way of life.

Even more impressive is that Quimare and Chavez Cruz ran the Boston Marathon in huaraches and traditional garb.

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Credit: Runner’s World Mexico/Facebook

I mean, just look at the picture above! Those are huaraches, not high-end expensive running shoes!

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Credit: “Fresh Off The Boat”/ ABC/Twitter

In addition to their ultra-distance ways, the Tarahumara are known for running barefoot or in huaraches made out of tires or raw hide. They’re also credited for starting the barefoot running trend.

And how did our two runners do? Quimare and Chavez Cruz finished the 26.2-mile run 7,363rd and 12,083rd in their categories, respectively.

READ: Diego Huerta Is Capturing The Most Amazing Photos Of Indigenous Mexicans

Inspired by these fantastic indigenous runners? Don’t forget to tell your friends about them by clicking the share button below!

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