Culture

13 Latino Foods We Didn’t Like As Kids, But Now We LOVE

Mom had a way with food. Too bad as kids we didn’t realize it and were DISGUSTED. But now that we are older and wiser, we have come to embrace these dishes. In fact, we miss this sh*t more than early release days at school. Here’s what we love now that we’re grown-ass adults.

1. Paella

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Credit: @lirong_s / Instagram

Seafood was always questionable, and when it looked back at me, I was out. Nowadays, I get a double order of paella for myself.

2. Ceviche

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Credit: @valeriatrinidad / Instagram

The look of ceviche was enough for me to run for the hills. Nowadays I get pissed when it’s not on a menu.

3. Loroco

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Credit: @whatsthatyourecookin714 / Instagram

Trying to get me to eat flowers was probably the weirdest, but the older I got the more adventurous I was and I learned just how delicious it is.

Read: 9 Mexican Food Items from Whole Foods that Deserve a ‘You Tried’ Sticker

4. Churrasco

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Credit: @churrascada / Instagram

What Latino doesn’t like a huge slab of meat, slightly bleeding, on their plate? Answer: kids. Now this makes my mouth water.

5. Picadillo

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Credit: @xostephie / Instagram

My inner-child sees meat with raisins and bananas and thinks #grossAF. Adult me is like, “Can I have another round please?” now it’s a proud symbol of our culture, so we gobble it up.

6. Arroz con Leche

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Credit: @jessicahollweg / Instagram

I always wanted my pudding smooth and creamy, until I grew up and discovered this.

7. Papitas de Platanos

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Credit: @gtvibess / Instagram

Why did I ever doubt the fried banana?!

8. Flan

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Credit: @dcfbabii / Instagram

As a kid it’s slimy texture made me dread dessert.  Today, this is what I consider nectar from the gods.

READ: Proof All These Trendy Hipster Foods Were Basically Invented By Our Latina Grannies

9. Nopales

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Credit: @alemayorgah / Instagram

Speaking of slimy, who decided to feed kids a damn cactus? Now, it’s like ?.

10. Avocado

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Credit: @nourishedco / Instagram

As a kid: it’s so bland and weird looking. As an adult: I put that sh*t on eeeeverything.

11. Chorizo

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Credit: @gijcjc / Instagram

Sausage is always full of mysteries and a child’s imagination has no limits. It’s probably best to wait till you’re an adult for this.

12. Plantanos Fritos (Maduros)

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Credit: @claudinesison / Instagram

Again, fried food that should be so enticing, until you bite into it and it was sweet! What the hell is that? However, as an adult, I can’t stop myself from taking another piece.

READ: Proof Latino Parents Deprived Us of a Normal Childhood

13. Frijoles

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Credit: @one_messy_kitchen / Instagram

In all honesty, they never tasted bad as a child, but the smell was the stuff of nightmares. You always knew when mami had frijoles on the stove. Now, I have her FedEx me leftovers.

Share this story with your amigos so you can all reminisce about your childhood over some ceviche.

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A University Is Releasing A Historic Mexican Cookbook Filled With Recipes You’d Want To Try

Culture

A University Is Releasing A Historic Mexican Cookbook Filled With Recipes You’d Want To Try

UTSA

The University of Texas San Antonio is bringing the history of Mexico into our kitchens. The university is releasing cookbooks that are collections of historic Mexican recipes. Right now, the desserts book is out and online for free. Main dishes and appetizers/drinks are coming soon.

You can now taste historic Mexico thanks to the University of Texas San Antonio.

UTSA has had an ongoing project of preserving, collecting, and digitizing cookbooks from throughout Mexico’s history. Some books date back to the 1700s and offer a look into Mexico’s culinary arts and its evolution.

UTSA has been digitizing Mexican cookbooks for years and the work is now being collected for people in the time of Covid.

Millions of us are still at home and projects like these can be very exciting and exactly what you need. The recipes are a way to distract yourself from the current reality.

“The e-pubs allow home cooks to use the recipes as inspiration in their own kitchens,” Dean Hendrix, the dean of UTSA Libraries, said in UTSA Today. “Our hope is that many more people will not only have access to these wonderful recipes but also interact with them and experience the rich culture and history contained in the collection.”

The free downloads are a way for people to get a very in-depth look into Mexican food history.

The first of three volumes of the cookbooks focuses on desserts so you can learn how to make churros, chestnut flan, buñelos, and rice pudding. What better way to spend your quarantine than learning how to make some of these yummy desserts. We all love sweets, right?

If you want to get better with making your favorite desserts, check out this cookbook and make it happen.

There is nothing better than diving into your history and using food as your guide. Food is so intrinsically engrained in our DNAs and identities. We love the foods and sweets from our childhood because they hold a clue as to who we are and where we come from. This historical collection of recipes throughout history is the perfect way to make that happen.

READ: The Laziest Food Hacks In All Of The Land Would Send Your Abuela To The Chancla

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People Have A Lot Of Opinions About The Argentina Episode Of Netflix’s ‘Street Food: Latin America’

Culture

People Have A Lot Of Opinions About The Argentina Episode Of Netflix’s ‘Street Food: Latin America’

Manuel Velasquez / Getty Images

Netflix has a new food show out and it has everyone buzzing. “Street Food: Latin America” is bringing everyone the sabor of Latin America to their living room. However, reviews are mixed because of Argentina and the lack of Central American representation.

Netflix has a new show and it is all about Latin American street food.

Some of the best food in the world comes from Latin America. That is just a fact and it isn’t because our families and community come for Latin America. Okay, maybe just a little. The food of Latin America comes with history and stories that have shaped our childhood. For many of us, it is the only thing we have that connects us to the lands our families have left.

The show is highlighting the contributions of women to street food.

“Street Food: Latin America” focuses mainly on the women that are leading the street food cultures in different countries in Latin America. For some of them, it was a chance to bring themselves out of poverty and care for their children. For others, it was a rebellion against the male-dominated culture of cooking in Latin America.

However, some people have some strong opinions about the show and they aren’t good.

There is a lot of attention to native communities in the Latino community culturally right now. The Argentina episode where someone claims that Argentina is more European is rubbing people the wrong way right now. While the native population of Argentina is small, it is still important to highlight and honor native communities who are indigenous to the lands.

The disregard for the indigenous community is upsetting because indigenous Argentinians are fighting for their lives and land.

An A Jazeera report focused on an indigenous community in northern Argentina who were fighting to protect their land. After decades of discrimination and humiliation, members of the Wichi community fought to protect their land from the Argentinian government grabbing it in 2017. Early this year, before Covid, children of the tribe started to die at alarming rates of malnutrition.

Another pain point in the Latino community is the complete disregard of Central America.

Central America includes Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Belize, and Panama. Central America’s exclusion is not sitting right with Netflix users with Central American heritage. Like, how can five whole countries be looked over during a Netflix show about street food in Latin America?

Seems like there is a chance for Netflix to revisit Latin America for more food content.

There are so many countries in Latin America that offer delicious foods to the world. There is more to Latin America than Brazil, Mexico, Peru, Argentina, Colombia, and Bolivia.

READ: This Iconic Mexican Food Won The Twitter Battle To Be Named Latin America’s Best Street Food

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