Culture

Latinos Will Never Look At These Emojis The Same Again

Emojis have all kinds of meanings. Most of them, tbh, don’t make sense…but here are some emojis that Latinos will instantly understand.

1. El Chavo Del Ocho (Chespirito)

chavo del ocho final
CREDIT: TARINGA.NET/EMOJIPEDIA.ORG

It’s the eyes… and the hat… and the nose a little bit. The shirt is totally wrong.

2. El Pollo Loco

POLLO LOCO FINAL
CREDIT: ADELEUDDO.COM/EMOJIPEDIA.ORG

I also thought of this every time they mentioned “Los Pollos Hermanos” on Breaking Bad. My mouth’s still watering.

3. Chocolate Abuelita

abuelita final
CREDIT: EMOJIPEDIA.ORG / Amazon

I used to eat these without putting them in milk… and I still have most of my teeth. #Champ

4. Tastuanes

tastuanes final
CREDIT: LIKEANEXILEDSOUL.COM/EMOJIPEDIA.ORG

Think of him as a Mexican Krampus… or just a creepy guy in a creepy mask. Either one is accurate.

5.  Selena

selena final
CREDIT: PARATODOS.COM/EMOJIPEDIA.ORG

Immortalized by her music AND emojis!

6. Flan

flan final
CREDIT: THEINTERNATIONALKITCHEN.COM/EMOJIPEDIA.ORG

Que “custard” ni que nada! That’s a flan!

7. Pitbull

PITBULL FINAL
CREDIT: REUTERS.COM/EMOJIPEDIA.ORG

The bald head, the stunner shades. Dale!

8. El Gato GC

gato gc final
CREDIT: GARUYO.COM/TISABIGKJUCARBY.BLOGSPOT.COM

If you ever watched Saturday morning cartoons on Canal 5, then you know exactly who this is!

9. Sargento Refugio Pazguato From “Chespirito”

sargento final
CREDIT: TARINGA.NET/EMOJIPEDIA.ORG

I wish all of my police interactions were with this guy. Fluffy puppy dog included.

10. Pingüinos (Marinela)

pinguinos final
CRDIT: BOOKVIP.NET/EMOJIPEDIA.ORG

My fridge isn’t fully stocked unless I have at least ten of these.

11. Topollillo

TOPOLILLO FINAL
CREDIT: KATHYPAYNTER.COM/EMOJIPEDIA.ORG

Who doesn’t remember going to bed to the songs of this cute – and maybe borderline creepy puppet mouse?

12. Señor Frogs

SENOR FROGS FINAL
CREDIT: COMMONS.WIKIMEDIA.ORG/EMOJIPEDIA.ORG

Whether you remember your nights there or not, it was definitely kind of a good time.

13. JLo

JLo
CREDIT: DAMNCOOLPICTURES.COM/EMOJIPEDIA.ORG

Um… yeah.

READ: The Best Emoji Texts Only Latinos Totally Get

What other emojis have secret meanings for you? Write them down in the comments below, and share with your friends!

This Man Posts A Video Highlighting Mexican ‘Avatar The Last Airbender’ Characters And It’s So Accurate

Entertainment

This Man Posts A Video Highlighting Mexican ‘Avatar The Last Airbender’ Characters And It’s So Accurate

@nacho_libro_ / TikTok

Who here loves “Avatar The Last Airbender”? It is one show that has been around for so long that the fanbase can only grow. The show is a fantasy ride that will take you to some of the most imaginative places. However, one fan realized something no one else did: some of the characters are Mexicans. Here’s what he found.

Roku

Credit: @nacho_libro_ / TikTok

Roku, a.k.a. “El Espiritu,” is one of the Mexicanos rocking it in the Fire Nation. Roku’s memory served as a guiding force for Aang along his long and storied journey. It is like that one compa you have who is always able to help you out of a jam. You never know how he will do it but he always does.

Sokka

Credit: @nacho_libro_ / TikTok

You might know Sokka as the defacto leader of the Water Nation for a time. When he was younger, Sokka wanted to join his father in the war. He tried his best and left with all of the men to join the fight. However, he was too young to fight and was sent back but was the oldest male and became the leader of the tribe. Much like that primo we all have who is the oldest of the primos and teaches us everything. Where would we be without that primo?

Zuko

Credit: @nacho_libro_ / TikTok

Zuko was born into the royal family of the Fire Nation. The prince abdicated his throne and lived in exile. For years, Zuko tried his best to catch the long-lost Avatar to get back into his kingdom. We all know that one friend that is trying to make up for something. At the end of the day, he is a good dude but he just has some things that he has to work out.

“Avatar the Last Airbender” fans are asking for more.

Credit: @nacho_libro_ / TikTok

There are so many more people that can be made into Mexican airbenders. The first three are already a success for the TikTok user with more than 234,000 views. Fans want more and it just seems like the perfect time to create more.

And it wasn’t just the setup.

Credit: @nacho_libro / TikTok

The TikTok user came through with his joke. Not only was the haircut so on point, he included a bunch of easter eggs. One of them was the América jersey that left some viewers screaming. Watch the video here and enjoy.

READ: Netflix Is Bringing Us An Anime Series Based In Fictional Mexico And We Are Here For It

A Photographer Is Capturing New Mexico’s Chicanx Community Through Portraits

Culture

A Photographer Is Capturing New Mexico’s Chicanx Community Through Portraits

Courtesy of Frank Blazquez

Photographer Frank Blazquez is paying a loving homage to Chicanx culture in the Land of Enchantment. The photographer is showing the world what it looks like to be Chicanx in New Mexico to highlight the diversity in a shared experience.

Frank Blazquez wants to show the world what Chicanx culture looks like outside of California.

“I am an Illinois transplant, so I was fascinated, and eventually obsessed, with the differences in my ethnicity’s iconography,” Blazquez says about the inspiration behind his project “Barrios de Nuevo Mexico: Southwest Stories of Vindication.” “For example, in New Mexico, as opposed to the Midwest and East Coast, there is a strong connection to American geography. You’ll see Latinx people with New Mexico state symbols tattooed directly on their faces and skulls. But refreshing similarities such as hairstyle also struck me.”

The other reason Blazquez started to document these lives was because of the devastating and widespread impact of drug addiction.

View this post on Instagram

Sleepy with his Daughter

A post shared by Frank Blazquez (@and_frank13) on

Blazquez admits to once having a drug problem and eventually overcoming those struggles. Some of the people that he photographs are former drug users or others who have sought redemption.

“I started in 2016 just walking around Albuquerque’s Central Avenue in the War Zone earning my street photography badge. When I almost died a couple of times, I started to use my Instagram page more often to set up shoots and contact homies from my former days of opiate abuse,” Blazquez explains. “My friend Emilio created the random handle @and_frank13 and I kept it after he died in 2017 from drug complications; an event that made me work harder to present portraits of New Mexicans demonstrating faces of dignity, hence my project ‘Barrios de Nuevo Mexico: Southwest Stories of Vindication.'”

Photography was a passion for Blazquez that grew into something bigger than him as he learned.

Blazquez’s interest in photography and love of his culture combined to create a photo series celebrating the people in his life. Blazquez turned his lens to the people in his life to capture a beauty he saw in his own community that is often overlooked and ignored.

Blazquez is hoping to show people that Chicanx culture has spread farther than California because of an exodus.

“Homies escaping the three strikes law in California created an exodus in the ’90s that transferred new symbols from organizations, namely 18th Street, Sureños, and Norteños,” Blazquez explains about the Chicanx community in New Mexico. “As New Mexico is an expanse of serene beauty that attracts people to escape from former lives, in turn, symbols were exchanged such as black and gray tattoo and font styles with purist craft structure adhering to Southwest archetypes—fat ass cursive and serif fonts with ornate filigree stems.”

He acknowledges that California is known for its Chicanx and Latinx communities but there is so much more to teach people.

“LA fingers do not represent the millions of brown people outside of California and it certainly does not represent native-born New Mexicans,” Blazquez explains. “I learned the Latinx experience is entirely different in various locations—the California stereotype doesn’t carry itself across America. It’s enlightening to know that brown culture grows and adapts independently.”

The photographer also wants to teach people that the Latino community is vast and diverse.

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Homemade New Mexican Tattoos // #dukecity

A post shared by Frank Blazquez (@and_frank13) on

“That the Latin-spectrum in America is not pigeonholed to any sole category,” Blazquez says. “Knowing that the labels Mexican, Mexican-American, Chicanx (a/o), Latinx (a/o), Hispanic, Mexica (not Hispanic nor Latino), Indo-Latino, Afro-Latinx (a/o) are just several of the hundreds of labels available to classify my culture’s diaspora is important.”

“Duke City Diaries” is a mini-series on YouTube that Blazquez has produced to take you deeper into the lives of the people in his photos.

“I knew the profound faces from my 2010’s New Mexico experience would make great art and explain an important POC narrative at the same time,” Blazquez says. “Creating the short YouTube documentary series “Duke City Diaries” was also an offshoot from my portraiture and one that created distinct reception. The hateful and racist comments kept me moving forward to show a larger audience that racism still exists.”

Blazquez is currently working on a new photo series called Mexican Suburbs diving deeper into his themes of Chicanx culture and the opioid crisis.

READ: Photographer Diego Huerta Took An Update Photo Of The Most Beautiful Girl In Mexico