Culture

13 Dangerous Mexican Traditions

There is a certain daredevil quality to all Mexicanos.

Blindfold, spinning and piñatas.

#mexicantraditions #piñata ?

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Who the hell thought blindfolding a person, spinning them around until they’re super dizzy and giving them a stick was a good idea? Oh, and don’t forget the drunk tío who stands on the roof holding the rope. There’s always one who falls.

Let’s take it up a notch and add explosives to those piñatas with el quema de Judas.

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On the day before Easter, piñatas in the shape of anyone who behaved badly, like a Judas, is filled with explosives and burned in the middle of a crowd riding horses. It could not get any more dangerous.

Veladoras that stay lit 24/7.

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Major fire hazard. But Mexicans don’t care.

And one is never enough.

Un mar de velitas para la Virgen en su dia. #Guadalupana #Mexico #MexicanTraditions #12DaysOfDarling

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We always have to go above and beyond.

Cake suffocation.

https://www.instagram.com/p/_QY2n3PBRr/

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Have you ever tried breathing through layers of frosting?! Impossible.

Leave it up to Mexicans to make dancing a dangerous activity with this machete dance.

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Yes, we have a dance with machetes. WE. DANCE. WITH. MACHETES.

READ: You’ve Been Mistaking These Things For Mexican Your Whole Life

Then there’s la danza de los voladores.

Just some local fun #playadelcarmen #mexico #mexicantraditions

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Apparently, the machete dance is not dangerous enough because we also have the danza de los voladores. Five men climbing up a pole, four of them hang from their feet, spinning around the pole while the fifth man stands on top of the pole playing a flute. Your blood pressure drops just watching them.

The line dance that always ends up a disaster: la vibora de la mar.

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Everyone’s fair game. The groom may fall, the bride may fall, single men or ladies may fall… you don’t know who, but someone always ends up eating sh*t.

Horse riding, but wait…

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Riding horses may not always be dangerous, but mix it with tequila, music and pedestrians during a crowded Mexican festival and you’ve got some trouble.

El Día de los Reyes.

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On el Día de los Reyes there’s always the risk of swallowing the baby Jesus on accident… or on purpose.

Launching a sh*t ton of fireworks.

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You know how fireworks come with all those warnings? Mexicanos ignore them all and there’s even a designated fireworks man or cuetero who fires them up during festivals.

Lucha Libre

Cleaning the house!

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CREDIT: @SISEPAGANDEADEVERAS / INSTAGRAM

All Mexicanos think they can fight like a luchador… even if they get their a$$ kicked by a pro.

Los jaripeos de toros.

#Jaripeo ??

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CREDIT: @WIWINGUTIERREZ / INSTAGRAM

Where Mexicans ride bulls for fun. Literally, for no reason other than the thrill.

What other dangerous Mexican traditions do you know about? Don’t forget to share this story with your friends by clicking the button below!

It Could Be Time To Say Goodbye To Your Salsa Forever As Tomatoes And Chilies Are In Danger Of Going Extinct

Culture

It Could Be Time To Say Goodbye To Your Salsa Forever As Tomatoes And Chilies Are In Danger Of Going Extinct

Pixabay

Two of Latin America’s most important ingredients – staples of cuisines across the region – are in danger of possible extinction thanks to climate change. Tomatoes and chilies both make up a huge part of traditional recipes from Mexico to Brazil and Argentina to Cuba – and they’re close to disappearing from grocery stores everywhere.

We know that tomato and chili are two fundamental ingredients in Mexican cuisine. Due to the threats suffered by its main pollinator, the bumblebee, these basic ingredients could disappear forever.

Climate change is wreaking havoc on the planet. But one of the most at-risk species is the humble bumble bee. These often feared insects are a vital source of pollination for thousands of plant and flower species around the world – if they disappear so too do the species of plants that depend on them.

Pollinators are species of great importance for a healthy environment. They are responsible for the the diversity and health of various biomes. Across Latin America, the bumble bee is largely responsible for the pollination of modern agriculture and this could have a major impact on the production of tomatoes and chilis.

Unfortunately, bumblebees are currently threatened, resulting in the possible extinction of different vegetables, including tomatoes and chili.

But why does the tiny bumble bee matter at all?

The bumble bee belongs to the insect family Apidae, which includes hundeds of different species of bumblebees. In fact, the bumble bee can be found on every continent except Antarctica and plays an outsized role in agriculture. The insects are often larger than honey bees, come in black and white varieties and often feature white, yellow, or orange stripes. This genus belongs to the Apidae family that includes different species commonly known as bumblebees. They’re almost entirely covered by very silky hairs. An adult bumblebee reaches 20 millimeters or more and feeds primarily on nectar from flowering plants. A curious fact is that females have the ability to sting, while males do not.

Bumblebees are epic pollinators of the tomato and chili plantS. Together with different species, the bumblebee helps produce many staple foods that are part of healthy diets around the world. If these become extinct the eating habits of all Latinos would suffer drastic changes as several vegetables would disappear.

So why are bumblebees in danger?

The main threat of these insects is the pesticides used in modern agriculture. That is why it is necessary to avoid consuming food produced in this way. We can all help the bumblebee planting plants, protecting native species and especially not damaging their natural environment.

But climate change is also wreaking havoc on the breeding patters of bumblebees – leading to colony collapse. With fewer colonies there is less breeding and therefore fewer bees around the world to pollinate our global crops.

Can you imagine a world without tomatoes or chilies?

Salsa. Moles. Pico de gallo. Ketchup. Chiles rellenos. Picadillo. All of these iconic Latin American dishes would be in danger of going extinct along with the bumblebee – because what’s a mole without the rich, complex flavors of dried chilies?

Several groups are already working hard to help fund programs that would work to conserve the dwindling bumblebee populations. While others are working out solutions that could perhaps allow tomatoes and chilies to self-pollinate – much as other plants already do.

Latinos Are Taking To Twitter To Call Out The Stereotypes And Tropes In The Criticized Novel ‘American Dirt’

Entertainment

Latinos Are Taking To Twitter To Call Out The Stereotypes And Tropes In The Criticized Novel ‘American Dirt’

Amazon / @jpbrammer / twitter

“American Dirt” is one novel grabbing all of the headlines for all the wrong reasons. The book, written by a Puerto Rican woman, has been dragged for relying on stereotypes and tropes about Mexicans to tell a tale of migrating to the U.S. Several celebrities, including Oprah Winfrey, have praised the book sparking a more severe backlash from people. The novel has led to a Twitter trend of Latinos writing their own Latino novels using the same kinds of stereotypes found throughout the book.

Latinos on Twitter are dragging “American Dirt” author Jeanine Cummins.

Credit: @jpbrammer / Twitter

Social media has been calling out Jeanine Cummins and everyone who has endorsed “American Dirt.” The main complaint has been the insensitive and stereotypical writing trying to tell a Mexican story from a non-Mexican writer.

It wasn’t long until Latino Twitter users took to the micro-blogging site to show how ludicrous the book is.

Credit: @mathewrodriguez / Twitter

Several creatives have shared paragraphs playing up tired and offensive stereotypes to shine a light on what they see in “American Dirt.” Some stars, like Salma Hayek, have had to apologize for promoting the book without reading it.

Latinos from all walks, not just Mexican, have joined in on the social media trend.

Credit: @livesinpages / Twitter

There have long been discussions about the proper representation of Latinos in media. From books to movies to television to comics, the conversations have long revolved around the lack of the people telling the stories. “American Dirt” is another example of someone not from an experience writing about the experience and totally missing the mark.

Some of the tweets are short and sweet but pack a punch.

Credit: @bodega_gyro_ao / Twitter

The backlash against “American Dirt” has been so strong and sustained that even Oprah Winfrey has had to change her tune. The media megastar has announced a deeper panel discussion about the book to really bring to light the underlying frustrations with the books.

Latinos have long been underrepresented and ignored but it seems critics are on track to win this battle.

Credit: @alexarriaga_ / Twitter

What do you think about the controversy around “American Dirt” and the celebrities who praised and promoted it without reading it?

READ: Here’s Why The Oprah Winfrey-Promoted Book ‘American Dirt’ Is Getting So Much Heat