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13 Dangerous Mexican Traditions

There is a certain daredevil quality to all Mexicanos.

Blindfold, spinning and piñatas.

#mexicantraditions #piñata ?

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Who the hell thought blindfolding a person, spinning them around until they’re super dizzy and giving them a stick was a good idea? Oh, and don’t forget the drunk tío who stands on the roof holding the rope. There’s always one who falls.

Let’s take it up a notch and add explosives to those piñatas with el quema de Judas.

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On the day before Easter, piñatas in the shape of anyone who behaved badly, like a Judas, is filled with explosives and burned in the middle of a crowd riding horses. It could not get any more dangerous.

Veladoras that stay lit 24/7.

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Major fire hazard. But Mexicans don’t care.

And one is never enough.

Un mar de velitas para la Virgen en su dia. #Guadalupana #Mexico #MexicanTraditions #12DaysOfDarling

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We always have to go above and beyond.

Cake suffocation.

https://www.instagram.com/p/_QY2n3PBRr/

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Have you ever tried breathing through layers of frosting?! Impossible.

Leave it up to Mexicans to make dancing a dangerous activity with this machete dance.

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Yes, we have a dance with machetes. WE. DANCE. WITH. MACHETES.

READ: You’ve Been Mistaking These Things For Mexican Your Whole Life

Then there’s la danza de los voladores.

Just some local fun #playadelcarmen #mexico #mexicantraditions

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Apparently, the machete dance is not dangerous enough because we also have the danza de los voladores. Five men climbing up a pole, four of them hang from their feet, spinning around the pole while the fifth man stands on top of the pole playing a flute. Your blood pressure drops just watching them.

The line dance that always ends up a disaster: la vibora de la mar.

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Everyone’s fair game. The groom may fall, the bride may fall, single men or ladies may fall… you don’t know who, but someone always ends up eating sh*t.

Horse riding, but wait…

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Riding horses may not always be dangerous, but mix it with tequila, music and pedestrians during a crowded Mexican festival and you’ve got some trouble.

El Día de los Reyes.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BAOc_f1CqUu/

CREDIT: @LIZTOMANIALV1 / INSTAGRAM

On el Día de los Reyes there’s always the risk of swallowing the baby Jesus on accident… or on purpose.

Launching a sh*t ton of fireworks.

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You know how fireworks come with all those warnings? Mexicanos ignore them all and there’s even a designated fireworks man or cuetero who fires them up during festivals.

Lucha Libre

Cleaning the house!

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CREDIT: @SISEPAGANDEADEVERAS / INSTAGRAM

All Mexicanos think they can fight like a luchador… even if they get their a$$ kicked by a pro.

Los jaripeos de toros.

#Jaripeo ??

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CREDIT: @WIWINGUTIERREZ / INSTAGRAM

Where Mexicans ride bulls for fun. Literally, for no reason other than the thrill.

What other dangerous Mexican traditions do you know about? Don’t forget to share this story with your friends by clicking the button below!

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Here Are 9 Salsas From Across Latin America That You’ll Carry In Your Bag Every Day Of The Week

Culture

Here Are 9 Salsas From Across Latin America That You’ll Carry In Your Bag Every Day Of The Week

I guarantee that since Beyonce’s hit anthem ‘Formation’ hit the airwaves, we’ve all been wanting to channel our inner Bey and carry some hot sauce in our bags. But which one would you choose?  

Whether you prefer sweet and sour, ranch, spicy, or mild, when it comes to options, the possibilities are endless!

A sauce’s beauty is that every country has its famous creation that usually accompanies their traditional dishes. Every Latin American country has its mouth-watering sauce that was created using recipes passed down from ancestors.

AJILIMOJILI

In Puerto Rico, this sauce is quite popular because of its ají dulce flavor – a mix of sweet and sour notes. The green salsa is the Caribbean’s version of hot sauce and is added to recipes, such as seafood and boiled vegetables.

VALENTINA

Few of us don’t know about the magic that is Valentina. Pour that sauce all over your papas, pizza, jicama, elotes, and so much more. And it’s great because it’s available in a variety of heat levels so everyone can enjoy. 

TIÁ LUPITA HABANERO SAUCE

This Habanero Hot Sauce is an original family recipe of the brand and combines just the right amount of heat with each fruit’s natural sweetness. It is handmade in small batches, using only habanero peppers, dates, mangos, and spices. All ingredients are sourced from local farms and are non-GMO and gluten-free certified.

The sauce can be used as a condiment with breakfast burritos, eggs, sandwiches, tacos, pulled pork, steak, chicken, fish, quesadillas, and more.

CHIMICHURRI

Chimichurri is mostly tied to Argentina, even though other countries also serve the herb-based salsa. To achieve the perfect chimichurri, mix parsley, oregano, garlic, onion, pepper, vinegar, and olive oil. Pair with meat cuts like churrasco and watch the magic happen.

CHIRMOL

In Central America, chismol or chirmol is made of tomatoes, onion, peppers and other ingredients. It’s similar to pico de gallo and is used in a variety of dishes.

RICANTE

Sauce, dressing, dip, marinade… Ricante does it all and with no sugar or salt added and with just the right amount of approachable spice. Ricante is not only Non-GMO, Gluten-Free, and Keto Friendly, but tiá approved!

Ricante launched with five incredibly unique hot sauces, marrying non-traditional essences like apples, mangos, carrots, and habaneros.

SALSA ROSA

Pastas are enjoyed all across Latin America, especially in Argentina and Uruguay, which pair the dishes with salsa rosa, a tomato-based sauce mixed with heavy cream. Together, they create a pink paste that blankets a variety of pasta dishes.

TACTICAL TACOS

Wait, so not all taco bases are citrus?! Tactical Tacos knows how to do taco sauce right with their notes of orange, lime, and cilantro to start your bite out just right, followed up with a perfect hint of Jalapeno and Cayenne pepper in the background. That’s just their mild sauce, Snafu. The Fire Fight and Ghost Protocol give you a similar ride with the citrus kick but with a much bigger spice hit for those that are brave enough to try it out!

MOLE

Mole is a spicy-and-sweet sauce made from chocolate that translates. The dark brown sauce gets its heat from chiles, but also has a touch of sweetness from the cacao, almonds, and peanuts often added. The sauce is topped with sesame seeds.

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Yalitza Aparicio Has Landed Her First Role Since “Roma” And We Cannot Wait

Entertainment

Yalitza Aparicio Has Landed Her First Role Since “Roma” And We Cannot Wait

For fans of Yalitza Aparicio from the now iconic film Roma, we have been waiting almost three years to know what’s next for the Oscar-nominated actress. And now, we finally have some answers.

The Roma actress is set to star in an upcoming horror film that’s already started filming.

Anyone who saw Alfonso Cuarón’s Roma immediately fell in love with Cleo, the character played by Oscar-nominated actress Yalitza Aparicio. Her award-winning part in Roma was her very first acting gig and despite her success, she hasn’t acted in anything since, until now.

Aparicio is set to star in an upcoming horror film Presences, a horror film from Innocent Voices director Luis Mandoki. As reported by Mexican publication El Universal, production on Aparicio’s second feature kicked off this week in Tlalpujahua in central Mexico.

According to El Universal: “The film tells the story of a man who loses his wife and goes to seclude himself in a cabin in the woods, where strange things happen.” Production in Tlalpujahua is expected to last for a month.

Although this is only her second role, Aparicio has kept herself busy with several projects.

Aparicio was a schoolteacher plucked from obscurity to star in “Roma,” which resulted in her becoming the first Mexican woman to be Oscar nominated for Best Actress in 14 years and the first Indigenous woman in history. And her Indigenous identity is a major part of her career.

While “Presences” marks the first movie Aparicio has taken on since “Roma,” the actress has remained busy over the last two years, including supporting Indigenous film community efforts in Mexico.

The actress has teamed with projects such as Cine Too to help extend access to cinema to marginalized communities. Cine Too is a one-screen, 75-seat cinema in Guelatao de Juárez, Oaxaca that serves as an educational center for the next generation of Indigenous filmmakers.

“It’s important to save these spaces because they reach places where the arts are often not accessible,” Aparicio told IndieWire. “I come from a community where there’s no movie theater, and as a consequence the population, especially the children that grow up those communities, has less of an interest in the cinematic arts. [Cine Too] has the possibility to reach these children and provide an opportunity to instill in them the passion for cinema and teach them about this art form.”

Aparicio continued, “My objective in my career is to give visibility to all of us who have been kept in the dark for so long. The acting projects I’m working on are moving slowly because I’m putting all my efforts in not being pigeonholed because of my appearance. There are many people who have the disposition to help change things. We’ve had enough of people being typecast in certain roles or characters based on the color of their skin. We have a complicated job, because these things can’t be changed overnight but hopefully we can show people that the only limits are within us.”

“Wherever I go, I’ll always be proudly representing our Indigenous communities,” the actress concluded. “I’m conscious that every step I take may open doors for someone else and at the same time it’s an opportunity for society to realize we are part of it and that we are here.”

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