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13 Dangerous Mexican Traditions

Mexican traditions
Credit: @deks_partuzer0 / Instagram

There is a certain daredevil quality to all Mexicanos.

Blindfold, spinning and piñatas.

#mexicantraditions #piñata ?

A video posted by Alejandra De la Rocha Cardoza (@alee.dlrc) on

CREDIT: @ALEE.DLRC / INSTAGRAM

Who the hell thought blindfolding a person, spinning them around until they’re super dizzy and giving them a stick was a good idea? Oh, and don’t forget the drunk tío who stands on the roof holding the rope. There’s always one who falls.

Let’s take it up a notch and add explosives to those piñatas with el quema de Judas.

CREDIT: @DEKS_PARTUZER0 / INSTAGRAM

On the day before Easter, piñatas in the shape of anyone who behaved badly, like a Judas, is filled with explosives and burned in the middle of a crowd riding horses. It could not get any more dangerous.

Veladoras that stay lit 24/7.

CREDIT: @LAUOPV / INSTAGRAM

Major fire hazard. But Mexicans don’t care.

And one is never enough.

Un mar de velitas para la Virgen en su dia. #Guadalupana #Mexico #MexicanTraditions #12DaysOfDarling

A photo posted by Angelina Pifano (@angiepifano) on

CREDIT: @ANGIEPIFANO / INSTAGRAM

We always have to go above and beyond.

Cake suffocation.

https://www.instagram.com/p/_QY2n3PBRr/

CREDIT: @CHEERGUY_13 / INSTAGRAM

Have you ever tried breathing through layers of frosting?! Impossible.

Leave it up to Mexicans to make dancing a dangerous activity with this machete dance.

CREDIT: @DIEGO_GOH_ / INSTAGRAM

Yes, we have a dance with machetes. WE. DANCE. WITH. MACHETES.

READ: You’ve Been Mistaking These Things For Mexican Your Whole Life

Then there’s la danza de los voladores.

Just some local fun #playadelcarmen #mexico #mexicantraditions

A video posted by @annegilbert on

CREDIT:@ANNEGILBERT / INSTAGRAM

Apparently, the machete dance is not dangerous enough because we also have the danza de los voladores. Five men climbing up a pole, four of them hang from their feet, spinning around the pole while the fifth man stands on top of the pole playing a flute. Your blood pressure drops just watching them.

The line dance that always ends up a disaster: la vibora de la mar.

CREDITO:@DULDELRIO / INSTAGRAM

Everyone’s fair game. The groom may fall, the bride may fall, single men or ladies may fall… you don’t know who, but someone always ends up eating sh*t.

Horse riding, but wait…

CREDIT: @FBORRALLASMEXTKD118 / INSTAGRAM

Riding horses may not always be dangerous, but mix it with tequila, music and pedestrians during a crowded Mexican festival and you’ve got some trouble.

El Día de los Reyes.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BAOc_f1CqUu/

CREDIT: @LIZTOMANIALV1 / INSTAGRAM

On el Día de los Reyes there’s always the risk of swallowing the baby Jesus on accident… or on purpose.

Launching a sh*t ton of fireworks.

CREDIT: @RICARDO_LOGUM / INSTAGRAM

You know how fireworks come with all those warnings? Mexicanos ignore them all and there’s even a designated fireworks man or cuetero who fires them up during festivals.

Lucha Libre

Cleaning the house!

A photo posted by Si se pegan de a de veras (@sisepegandeadeveras) on

CREDIT: @SISEPAGANDEADEVERAS / INSTAGRAM

All Mexicanos think they can fight like a luchador… even if they get their a$$ kicked by a pro.

Los jaripeos de toros.

#Jaripeo ??

A video posted by Edwin Gutierrez (@wiwingutierrez) on

CREDIT: @WIWINGUTIERREZ / INSTAGRAM

Where Mexicans ride bulls for fun. Literally, for no reason other than the thrill.

What other dangerous Mexican traditions do you know about? Don’t forget to share this story with your friends by clicking the button below!

These Extra AF Esquites Recipes Will Leave Your Mouth Watering And Wondering Why Didn’t I Think Of That

Culture

These Extra AF Esquites Recipes Will Leave Your Mouth Watering And Wondering Why Didn’t I Think Of That

This is a #TeamEsquites fan page only, y’all. For anyone who needs further proof that esquites are the most versatile way to enjoy elote, por favor, send them our way. As perfect and savory a classic esquites dish is, we would like to point out that esquites make any other dish extra extra.

The esquites you’re about to be inspired by are very real and replicable. Beware: so many elotes were harmed in the making of this gallery.

Anything you can do, esquites can do better.

@EloteFinder / Twitter

This Unicorn Elote is made by dying queso and mayo different colors, and then “painting” the end product. Then, each layer is adorned with a variety of Flaming Hot Cheetos, Takis, or other dyed condiments to add a crunch that matches the layers.

Detroit-based La Catrina is giving us the “Flaming Hot Esquites” from all angles.

@lacatrina_lp / Instagram

The best part of esquites is that they can be easily added to any dish as that extra special layer. This one is more like Flaming Hot Cheetos with a side of esquites, and we’re okay with it.

Yes, Sandia Loca is real.

@lafresitabionicos / Instagram

When Tajín is responsible for the tangy spice of esquites, you know fruit is invited to the party. Americans like to keep watermelon and corn on the cob separate at pool parties, but these two flavors party better together.

Latinos did that. Maruchan + Esquites=🔥🔥🔥

@lachocitadelelote / Twitter

This service announcement is made possible by Latino ingenuity and Tajín™. Thank you for coming to this TED talk.

Esquites served in a Dodgers baseball hat:

@LADExecChef / Instagram

You know Mexicans run L.A. when you can go to the local baseball stadium and order esquites off the menu…. in a keepsake Dodgers hat.

Head to Lincoln Park to find this Elote Loco.

@lacatrina_lp / Instagram

Let it be known that La Catrina’s base level esquite looks like this. From there, it gets more and more extra. You can’t even see the cup under all that queso!

Like this Bacon Supreme Esquites:

@lacatrina_lp / Instagram

It’s your standard, absolutely insane, Elote Loco, with a base of Flaming Hot Cheetos and topped and stuffed with bacon, esquites, and queso. Consider it a protein add on.

We’re going to call this the low-waste way to enjoy esquites:

@churritoloco / Twitter

Garnish those Flaming Hot’s directly in the bag whence it came. Try your best to seal the bag, mix it all up, and steal a few extra cheetos from your friend to top it off.

Pro tip: You can do this with your favorite chippys.

@HerreraUzziel / Twitter

Using spicy Doritos basically makes it a nacho meal on the go. Like I said, this gallery is all about Latino innovation, baby.

This person decided to layer their favorite foods into one bomb-looking dish.

@paulabendfeldt / Instagram

We kid you not, that is an Eggo waffle. Who says you can’t live in a food desert and make pretty things happen? Snap that pic and then smother it all with crushed up Flaming Hots.

Seed to Sprout has a lil something for the vegans.

@seedtosprout / Instagram

Statistically, 1 in 2 Latinos report lactose intolerance, and the number get higher with other people of color. Good thing this restaurant is ‘gram advertising it’s ” 🌽 Roasted sweet corn with cashew lime crema, cashew cotija + fresh cilantro” for us dairy-averse folk.

This person just mixed guacamole with esquites and added the mayo on top.

@PatiJinich / Instagram

We know what you’re thinking. Yes, it is healthy esquites and technically avocados are a fruit, so consider this your serving of fruits and vegetables for the day. 😇

We bow down to the elotero who started serving cacahuetes with these esquites.

@buevitoconcatsun / Instagram

Are you drooling yet? Send this to that coworker who needs a little inspiration to walk a block with you to meet your friendly elotero. We all know its worth it.

Cholo Scar Calls His Dad To Get His Famous Birria Recipe And Their Bond Is The Sweetest, Most Unexpected Thing Ever

Culture

Cholo Scar Calls His Dad To Get His Famous Birria Recipe And Their Bond Is The Sweetest, Most Unexpected Thing Ever

mitú

There is something so comforting and soothing about a hot bowl of birria in the middle of summer. Yeah. That’s right. We are talking about a steam bowl of chiles based soup in the middle of the hottest part of the year and we have no shame about it. Everyone is always joking about how our parents make us eat soup in the summer but the joke is really us becoming adults and making soup over the summer.

Birria is traditionally made with goat meat or carne de cabra but this recipe takes a page out of our convenience-based economy and uses some choice beef. What really makes this soup so unique and delicious is the use of the chiles to make the broth for the soup. The chiles used in the broth really gives the soup a special and hearty kick without overpowering your senses.

While some purist might think foods should always be prepared the same way doesn’t understand the true versatility of food. Cooking is about experimenting and creating things out of what you like. For some, goat meat is too gamey or tough making beef a perfect substitute. For those cutting out red meat, you can always try the dish with some chicken or any meat substitute that you might desire.

Soups are a universal dish. Every culture has a soup that hold some of the most iconic vegetables and meats of a region combined to create comfort food. These dishes are a great way to look into someone else culture. By tasting and exploring a soup, you can see the kinds of foods that bring people of that culture warmth, comfort, and tastes of home. If you think about it long enough, you will be able to point directly to a soup that you grew up with that is a representation of your culture and childhood in a bowl.

Ingredients:

  • 10 pounds of chuck roast beef cut into cubes
  • 1 pound of dried guajillo chiles, washed and dried
  • 1/2 pound of dried chiles de arbol, washed and dried
  • 1 bunch of cilantro, chopped
  • 1 garlic clove
  • 1 tomatillo
  • 2 tablespoons of chicken stock powder
  • 2 onions, one cut in quarters and one diced
  • 1 bunch of radishes, sliced thin
  • 3-4 bay leaves, depending on the size you are preparing

Directions:

  1. Fill a heavy bottom pot with water and bring to a boil. Add the beef to the water and let boil for about 3 hours. Check after 2 hours. The beef should be cooked enough that it starts to fall apart when you stick a fork in it.
  2. In another post, fill halfway with water and bring to a simmer. Slowly add the guajillo chiles, chiles de arbol, the quartered onion, the whole tomatillo, and the chicken broth powder. Raise heat and bring the water to a rolling boil. Once the water hits a boil, turn off the heat and cover for 30 minutes so it starts to cool down but continues to cook the ingredients without the boiling water.
  3. After the water has cooled down for 30 minutes, add the chiles, onion, tomatillo, and some reserved water to a blender. Pulse the blender until the chile mixture is smooth.
  4. Set a fine mesh sieve over a mixing bowl and pour the chile mixture into the sieve in batches so it doesn’t spill. Using the back of a spoon, press the child mixture through the so all you have in the bowl in a smooth liquid.
  5. In a sauté pan, add the cooked beef and the salsa you made. Cook over medium-low heat until the beef starts to shred on its own.
  6. Once the beef is ready, put some beef in serving bowls and cover with the salsa broth you made. Add the cilantro, diced onion, and sliced radish on top and serve while hot. Make sure everyone has a nice cold glass of horchata and some warmed tortillas to really make the meal a treat and enjoy this delicious dish.

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