Culture

13 Dangerous Mexican Traditions

There is a certain daredevil quality to all Mexicanos.

Blindfold, spinning and piñatas.

#mexicantraditions #piñata ?

A video posted by Alejandra De la Rocha Cardoza (@alee.dlrc) on

CREDIT: @ALEE.DLRC / INSTAGRAM

Who the hell thought blindfolding a person, spinning them around until they’re super dizzy and giving them a stick was a good idea? Oh, and don’t forget the drunk tío who stands on the roof holding the rope. There’s always one who falls.

Let’s take it up a notch and add explosives to those piñatas with el quema de Judas.

CREDIT: @DEKS_PARTUZER0 / INSTAGRAM

On the day before Easter, piñatas in the shape of anyone who behaved badly, like a Judas, is filled with explosives and burned in the middle of a crowd riding horses. It could not get any more dangerous.

Veladoras that stay lit 24/7.

CREDIT: @LAUOPV / INSTAGRAM

Major fire hazard. But Mexicans don’t care.

And one is never enough.

Un mar de velitas para la Virgen en su dia. #Guadalupana #Mexico #MexicanTraditions #12DaysOfDarling

A photo posted by Angelina Pifano (@angiepifano) on

CREDIT: @ANGIEPIFANO / INSTAGRAM

We always have to go above and beyond.

Cake suffocation.

https://www.instagram.com/p/_QY2n3PBRr/

CREDIT: @CHEERGUY_13 / INSTAGRAM

Have you ever tried breathing through layers of frosting?! Impossible.

Leave it up to Mexicans to make dancing a dangerous activity with this machete dance.

CREDIT: @DIEGO_GOH_ / INSTAGRAM

Yes, we have a dance with machetes. WE. DANCE. WITH. MACHETES.

READ: You’ve Been Mistaking These Things For Mexican Your Whole Life

Then there’s la danza de los voladores.

Just some local fun #playadelcarmen #mexico #mexicantraditions

A video posted by @annegilbert on

CREDIT:@ANNEGILBERT / INSTAGRAM

Apparently, the machete dance is not dangerous enough because we also have the danza de los voladores. Five men climbing up a pole, four of them hang from their feet, spinning around the pole while the fifth man stands on top of the pole playing a flute. Your blood pressure drops just watching them.

The line dance that always ends up a disaster: la vibora de la mar.

CREDITO:@DULDELRIO / INSTAGRAM

Everyone’s fair game. The groom may fall, the bride may fall, single men or ladies may fall… you don’t know who, but someone always ends up eating sh*t.

Horse riding, but wait…

CREDIT: @FBORRALLASMEXTKD118 / INSTAGRAM

Riding horses may not always be dangerous, but mix it with tequila, music and pedestrians during a crowded Mexican festival and you’ve got some trouble.

El Día de los Reyes.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BAOc_f1CqUu/

CREDIT: @LIZTOMANIALV1 / INSTAGRAM

On el Día de los Reyes there’s always the risk of swallowing the baby Jesus on accident… or on purpose.

Launching a sh*t ton of fireworks.

CREDIT: @RICARDO_LOGUM / INSTAGRAM

You know how fireworks come with all those warnings? Mexicanos ignore them all and there’s even a designated fireworks man or cuetero who fires them up during festivals.

Lucha Libre

Cleaning the house!

A photo posted by Si se pegan de a de veras (@sisepegandeadeveras) on

CREDIT: @SISEPAGANDEADEVERAS / INSTAGRAM

All Mexicanos think they can fight like a luchador… even if they get their a$$ kicked by a pro.

Los jaripeos de toros.

#Jaripeo ??

A video posted by Edwin Gutierrez (@wiwingutierrez) on

CREDIT: @WIWINGUTIERREZ / INSTAGRAM

Where Mexicans ride bulls for fun. Literally, for no reason other than the thrill.

What other dangerous Mexican traditions do you know about? Don’t forget to share this story with your friends by clicking the button below!

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

You Can Order A ‘Taco Vacuna’ And ‘La Cura’ At This Covid 19-Themed Taqueria

Culture

You Can Order A ‘Taco Vacuna’ And ‘La Cura’ At This Covid 19-Themed Taqueria

Tacovid: SaborViral / Facebook

Pandemia. Brote. Vacuna. La Peste. Although you may find these terms in a glossary about the Covid-19 outbreak, that’s not what these words actually refer to. Instead, they’re options on the menu at a Mexican taqueria called “Tacovid: Sabor Viral”, a perhaps surprisingly very successful Coronavirus-themed restaurant.

Although to many having a Covid-themed taqueria may seem morbid or disrespectful or perhaps gross – I mean who wants to order a plague taco? – the taqueria is making light of a very serious situation with humor. Something that several other businesses have done since the pandemic began.

”Tacovid: Sabor Viral” is the Mexican taqueria going viral – pun intended – for its Covid-themed menu.

Ok…virus-themed tacos don’t exactly sound appetizing. Especially, as we’re still in the midst of a very real pandemic. But one 23-year-old man in the Mexican city of León, who was forced to close down his dance studio because of Coronavirus, is counting on a Covid-themed restaurant – and so far he’s been surprised by its success.

Brandon Velázquez converted his dance academy into a taquería at the end of July, and given that Mexico and the rest of the world was – and is – in the midst of the Covid-19 pandemic decided to call it Tacovid Sabor Viral.

“I had to close my dance academy during the pandemic [but] then an opportunity arose to return to the same place, however, people still did not go out for fear of getting infected.” he told the newspaper El Universal.

“I had always wanted to open a taqueria and, at the end of July, the opportunity to do so occurred. It was how I took advantage of the moment to create this business with a coronavirus theme,” he added.

Items on the menu are named after – you guessed it – the Coronavirus and don’t sound like anything you’d willfully choose to order.

The young entrepreneur detailed the name of each dish, taking full advantage of the Coronavirus theme.

“We have around 12 different dishes, among them are the ‘Tacovid’; we have ‘Forty’, ‘Quesanitizing’, ‘Pandemic’, ‘Outbreak’, and many others. The price varies depending on the dish you order,” he told El Universal.

In addition to themed dishes, the servers also fit the Coronavirus-theme.

When the pandemic hit Mexico, the government urged Mexicans to observe “su sana distancia” and the now common mascot – Susana Distancia – was born.

“In the restaurant, a waitress dressed as a nurse with the name of ‘Susana’ takes orders and works the tables, referring to the healthy distance campaign that was implemented as a precautionary measure,” he says.

To his surprise – and honestly mine as well – the taqueria has been very successful.

Brandon told El Universal that he’s been pleasantly surprised by the support he has received from customers. “I’m surprised because we have had really good sales, despite the circumstances, we have had a lot of support by the community and we’ve already expanded to have two locations.”

“Customers are funny about the theme we are using in the business, and they are delighted with the dishes we are offering. They enjoy it and have a good time,” added Brandon.

Things are looking so good for Brandon and his Covid-themed taqueria, that he’s looking to expand the food business and add new dishes to the menu. “There is always the idea of new names for other dishes that we want to include in the menu.”

Brandon also said that he’s looking to build out a business model so the restaurant could expand to other parts of the country as a franchise.

Apparently, people are really into Covid-themed foods, as this isn’t the first place that a shop as cashed in on the pandemic. Back in April, a panadería was selling out of Covid-themed baked goods so quickly, they couldn’t keep the shelves stocked.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

A Mexicana Just Broke A World Record By Making The Fastest Ascent Of The Earth’s Three Highest Mountains

Fierce

A Mexicana Just Broke A World Record By Making The Fastest Ascent Of The Earth’s Three Highest Mountains

Joe Mitchell / Getty

Mexican climber Viridiana Álvarez Chávez, might just one of the few people in the world to know what it feels like to actually be on top of the world.

Recently, the climber managed to scale three of the world’s highest peaks to break the Guinness World Records title. And she did it all in under just two years.

Incredibly, Viridiana climbed to the top of the three highest mountains in a year and 364 days.

According to the Guinness World Records, Viridiana’s quest to break the record started on May 16, 2017, with Everest (8,848 meters; 29,029 feet high), followed by K2 (8,611 meters; 28,251 feet) on July 21, 2018, and ended at Kangchenjunga (8,856 meters; 28,169 feet) on May 15, 2019.

Viridiana is the first Latin American to climb K2, the world’s second-highest mountain. To celebrate her amazing accomplishments, Viridiana was honored with a remote ceremony in which Raquel Assis, the Senior Manager of Guinness World Records Latin America Records Management Team, also attended.

Speaking about her accomplishments, Assis congratulated Virdiana saying “We continue to inspire the world through our record holders. Records motivate people to recognize their potential and look at the world differently.”

Before Viridiana, the Guinness World Records title was held by South Korean climber Go Mi-Sun who climbed the three mountains in two years and two days.

Viridiana says her next mission is to climb the 14 highest mountains in the world which would make her the first North American to do so.

Besides being a climber, Viridiana is a public speaker who encourages young people to break standards. Her talks emphasize the importance of accomplishing goals through emotional intelligence, positivity, discipline, and consistency.

“My career as a mountaineer started with an unusual and inspirational purpose: a simple personal challenge to exercise, but I ended up giving up my office job; risking comfort to experience the magic of the mountains, Viridiana told Guinness Book of World Records. “It was proof that dreams do not have to be lifelong dreams and that anyone who sets them can achieve even what are considered ‘unattainable goals,’ such as breaking a world record.”

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com