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Latino-Themed Cap Designs For Your Graduation Inspo

Because we make everything fabulous, even graduation caps.

Some are displaying the quote that motivated them the most through those tough years.

Credit: @ninashandcrafted / Instagram

Sí se pudo.

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Give some love to la raza on your special day.

dianadelrosario95 / Instagram

The more of us that graduate and go into the workforce, the more diversity we bring into our fields. Bringing our diverse backgrounds and stories into the workforce will only make it better and easier for other Latinos after us to follow in our footsteps.

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 Graduation caps are a way to let everyone know you’re a Latina doing incredible things.

Credit: sheisaloneranger / Tumblr

What’s better than a young Latina chasing her dream? A young educated Latina breaking down walls! Get it, mija!

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If you can’t find the words, let Selena say it for you.

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Not only is this phrase super iconic, it is probably going to be recognized by so many people. Selena has had a stellar couple of years and, clearly, so have you.

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Others are dedicating their graduation to the people who gave them this opportunity.

Credit: @kimscustomcrafts / Instagram

Because you couldn’t have done it alone.

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Give your parents the ultimate shoutout for their sacrifices.

mig_sanc / Instagram

Maybe your parents were born in the U.S. and you don’t have the same story. That’s fine. Everyone’s parents did some kind of sacrificing to get their children to the stage. Good thing is that your madre always reminded you of what she gave up for you so it should be easy to figure out what to put on your cap.

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 Specifically mami, who was very influential in most people’s collegiate success.

Credit: smolpapi / Tumblr

Nothing got your ass to do your homework like her chancla.

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You can be as sappy as you want.

kimscustomcaps / Instagram

Nothing like a sweet, sweet poem to make your parents proud of your hard work and their sacrifices. After all, they are going to make sure that you remember how much work they put in to making sure you graduated.

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This is how you have the final word.

Credit: @chelseasezgin / @vcrebelt3i / Instagram

Case closed.

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One word: Frida.

Credit: fleurghost / Tumblr

Because these are words of wisdom.

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Here’s one way to let the haters know you f*cking did it.

Credit: pinche-paisita / Tumblr

It’s basically the Latino version of saying you slayed it.

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Get as minimalistic with it as you want.

sheisaloneranger / Tumblr

No need to get too crazy with things. Just a few well thought out words and some simple drawings should be enough. There is no need to get too crazy.

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Keep it short, sweet and con un poquito de español.

#graduationcap #ucf #personalizedgiftsarebetter #houseofknotts

A post shared by House of Knotts {Julie Knott} (@houseofknotts) on

Credit: @houseofknotts / Instagram

Because every U.S. college could benefit from an increased Latino presence. ??

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Others credit art for encouraging them to keep going.

Credit: hellopelican / Tumblr

Whether it’s Hamilton, Selena, Teresa or Paulina Rubio, they deserve to know they kept you pushing.

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READ: 7 Quinceañeras Who Didn’t Settle For Basic Themes

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A School District Employee Cut A Biracial Girl’s Hair Without Her Parents’ Permission

Fierce

A School District Employee Cut A Biracial Girl’s Hair Without Her Parents’ Permission

At a young age, Black women are often given the instruction to not allow “anyone to touch your hair” by their mothers or fathers. The direction is often given as a sort of shield. Don’t let anyone touch your hair can mean ‘don’t let anyone ruin the hard work I put into it’ but more underlining is the notion to not allow anyone to make you feel “other” because your hair is different from their own.

A father from Michigan has a new reason for delivering this message to his 7-year-old daughter.

On March 24, Jimmy Hoffmeyer’s daughter Jurnee came home from her school, Ganiard Elementary, with the right side of her hair sheered off by a classmate. According to USA Today, Jurnee’s schoolmate cut off two to three inches of Jurnee’s hair. That same day, Hoffmeyer brought Jurnee to a local hair salon to fix her hair. The stylist cut Jurnee’s hair in an asymmetrical cut and also provided the little girl with free haircuts until her hair finally grew back in length.

All seemed to have been fixed.

Then, two days later, Jurnee returned home from school with her hair cut on the other side.

Jurnee told her father that the school’s library employee cut off the other side. In an attempt to get answers, Hoffmeyer attempted to contact his daughter’s school over the phone. After several calls and no answers, he contacted the police.

According to USA Today, the Mount Pleasant Police Department told the oultet that Hoffmeyer contacted them but never filed a police report. 

Hoffmeyer went onto tell USA Today that an assistant at Jurnee’s school apologized to him for the incident before explaining that the school’s principal would not be able to speak with him until after spring break because he was out of the office. “On April 5, he said he received a call from the principal and was told the librarian would receive marks on her report but did not have the authority to do anything further,” reports USA Today. “Hoffmeyer said he received a call 45 minutes later from the district’s superintendent, Jennifer Verleger, who offered to send Jurnee an apology card in the mail.”

In response to the offer, Hoffmeyer said “An apology card to a 7-year-old who is humiliated and has to be around her classmates like this?”

The Mount Pleasant School District released a statement to parents that claimed “a student asked for her hair to be cut both times, first by a classmate and later by a library employee.”

The released letter was signed by Verlege and stated that Jurnee’s teacher knew that the library employee planned to cut her hair.

Both Jurnee’s teacher and the school librarian apologized for their actions.

Hoffmeyer, who is biracial told USA Today that “his classmate who cut his daughter’s hair and the librarian were both white, but he is trying hard not to make this situation about race. Jurnee’s mother is white.”

“It’s hard to come to any decision when you don’t have answers to why it was done,” Hoffmeyer told the outlet before revealing that he unenrolled Jurnee from her elementary school and she is now attending Vowles Elementary School.

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Indigenous Purépecha Woman Gets Full Ride Scholarship To Attend Harvard

Things That Matter

Indigenous Purépecha Woman Gets Full Ride Scholarship To Attend Harvard

In just a few months, college freshmen will be descending on their campuses across the country. One of these students is Elizabeth Esteban who is the first person from her indigenous tribe in Mexico to be accepted to an Ivy League school.

Elizabeth Esteban is going to Harvard and it is a major deal.

Esteban is a member of the Purépecha tribe, an indigenous community from Michoacán, Mexico. Esteban is the first member of her tribe to be accepted into an Ivy League university, where indigenous representation remains small. Esteban’s parents work as farm laborers in the eastern Coachella Valley in California.

“Well I felt proud and excited, every sort of emotion because I never would have believed that a person like me, would be accepted to a prestigious university,” Esteban told NBC News.

Not only was Esteban accepted into Harvard, a prestigious university, she also received a full-ride scholarship. Esteban’s family is part of a community of hundreds of Purépecha people who relocated to the easter Coachella Valley in search of work and a better life.

Esteban plans to study political science.

Dr. Ruiz Speaks with State of the Union Guest, Elizabeth from Desert Mirage High School.

Join me for a live conversation with my guest for tonight's State of the Union, Elizabeth from Desert Mirage High School!

Posted by Congressman Raul Ruiz, MD on Tuesday, February 4, 2020

Esteban wants to make a difference in her community. As an indigenous woman, Esteban wants to break barriers that are set on women in her community. She told NBC News that her community expects for women to stay home and be stay-at-home mothers.

The incoming Harvard freshmen was discouraged from applying to Harvard at one point because of her community’s unreliable internet connection. Esteban lives in a mobile home with her family in Mecca and struggled to complete course work. The internet went down in the middle of her Harvard interview and it almost prevented her from applying to the university.

“Well, I felt proud and excited, every sort of emotion because I never would have believed that a person like me, would be accepted to a prestigious university,” Esteban told NBC News about being accepted to Harvard on a full scholarship.

READ: California, Harvard, MIT File Lawsuits To Challenge Government’s International Student Visa Announcement

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