Entertainment

11 Chingona Quotes You’ll Want To put On Your Inspiration Board

From Facebook, to YouTube, and Instagram, entertainer Erika Angel never fails to crack up her fans. Not only are her videos funny AF, they also contain some valuable life lessons we can all learn from…

1. Dance off the haters.

when a bitch don't like me

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Preferably to Maná… Because if someone doesn’t like you, pues ya ni modo.

2. Or fly away from them.

😂😂😂😂😂😂 ábrete perra

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With your lashes.

3. Never be afraid to be unique.

when ur la famila peluche af

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Everyone else is just basic.

4. Take every opportunity to ✨shine.✨

Because if you don’t take risks and put yourself out there, someone else will take your spotlight.

5. Never let a boy mistreat you.

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Putting this on a quote board: Chillona pero chingona.

6. But if you’re sad, just let it out.

cuando extrañas a tu novio y te conviertes en …

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It’s okay to be vulnerable once in a while.

7. Be selfish when needed.

Put yourself (and your clothes) first.

8. Never forget your roots.

Because Work cumbia version is the shit 🔥🔥🔥🔥🔥🔥😩😩😩💀

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And take pride in your rich culture.

9. Embrace your identity.

The struggle of being Mexican American lmao 🙂

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In the words of Selena, “It’s exhausting!”

10. Instead of being insecure about your flaws, learn to embrace them.

no pony tails for me <3

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You’re just beating everyone else to the punch. Right, gallinas?

11. And most importantly, LOVE YO SELF.

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If you don’t, who will?


READ: 16 Life Lessons I Could Only Learn From Telenovelas

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Someone On Twitter Claims To Have Figured Out Who Bad Bunny’s Muse Is And We Are Here For It

Entertainment

Someone On Twitter Claims To Have Figured Out Who Bad Bunny’s Muse Is And We Are Here For It

Bad Bunny is as melodramatic as he is a hitmaker. The emo Latin trap king is always rapping or singing about a love interest, whether expressing heartbreak (“Amorfoda”), blaming his ex for the split (“Soy Peor”), declaring he’s better off without her (“Solo de Mí”), reminiscing on their past (“La Canción”), realizing he hasn’t quite moved on (“Triste”), acknowledging she was right all along (“Otra Noche en Miami”), imagining the life they could have had together (“Si Estuviésemos Juntos”), asking her to return (“Vuelve”) or reminding her that she’ll always be his (“Mia”).

Someone clearly broke El Conejo Malo’s heart — and a Twitter fan thinks he’s uncracked who the perp could be.

In a lengthy thread on Twitter, user and major Benito stan @vicentetrujillo8, also known as “god bunny,” made a convincing case on how Bad Bunny’s ex-girlfriend Carliz is the famed artist’s muse behind his biggest hits.

Credit: @vicentetrujilo8 / Twitter

“Este hilo es con fin de entrener y para hablar sobre una persona que ha sido fuente de inspiración para las letras de Benito, y como él la sigue recordando en sus canciones,” the Mexico-based enthusiast begins the thread, also posting an old photo of the former couple.

According to the fan, Benito and Carliz were high school sweethearts who dated from 2011 to 2017.

The pair allegedly worked at the Econo supermarket together in Vega Baja before his career took off in 2016. The following year, the couple, according to Vicente, had planned to wed. Instead, they split up. Since then, the sad boy pisces has made numerous songs about an ex, many that the Benito devotee believes were directed at Carliz.

In “Otra Noche en Miami,” Bad Bunny raps, “Pero son las 11:34 y de ti me acordé” y “En el garaje esta el Bentley que tanto querías.” In Vicente’s posts, he highlights two tweets from Carliz, one from February 14, 2018, Valentine’s Day, when she wrote simply “11:34” and another where she joked “voy a tener que empezar a cobra regalías.” 

In a later Instagram live, she also notes that her dream car is a Bentley.

There’s no solid proof that those Benito verses were directed to Carliz, but it does seem hella likely.

Vicente, however, digs deeper into El Conejo Malo’s lyrics for further evidence.

In “Si Estuviésemos Juntos,” an aged Bunny imagines a wedding with a woman that never took place, much like his planned nuptials with Carliz. Even more, the woman booked to be Benito’s bride in the video heavily resembles his ex, with bangs just as she used to have when they were dating.

In current songs like “No Me Conoce” Remix and “Callaíta,” Vicente is convinced he’s talking about Carliz.

Benito bigs up women who are both smart and sexy, he could once more be referring to women like Carliz, a student at the University of Puerto Rico School of Law who often takes videos of herself with friends singing and dancing along to reggaeton and Latin trap hits, oftentimes many of Bad Bunny’s own jams.

“Por lo que muestra en sus redes, podemos deducir que Carliz es una chica buena y estudiosa, pero que disfruta su vida junto a sus amigas. Una que otra vez, la hemos visto en sus historias de Instagram, bailar las canciones de Benito como Mía, Callaíta, No Me Conoce, etc,” Vicente writes.

While the fan makes a strong case about Carliz being the muse behind many of Bad Bunny’s songs, Bad Bunny has us thinking otherwise.

Credit: Chente Ydrach / YouTube

In an interview with Puerto Rican comedian Chente Ydrach, Benito noted that his songs were directed to different women and were even sometimes an imagining of what some of the ladies he has dated would say or feel about him.

In the interview, which was published on the funny guy’s vlog on December 24, the day Benito dropped his surprise debut album, Chente asks bluntly, “who are you talking about?”

“I’ve been a lover since I was a boy, since I was little. In the first grade, I’d bring a Valentine’s Day gift to school, and I would give it to the prettiest girl I saw that day. So since I was a kid, I’ve been a lover, and when I fall, I really love them and suffer and cry and think, ‘damn, I really love her.’ I’m of that flow,” he said, suggesting that he has had many heartbreaks and thus writes about each of them.

He goes on to say that the sad songs on X100PRE, as well as the ones that came before the album, are about different women from different times of life because he has gotten his heart broken on multiple occasions.

But he also adds that some of the songs are imaginings of what the women whose hearts he shattered would say about him.

“When I sing ‘Amorfoda’ in my concerts, I always say that I’ve fallen in love a thousand times, I’ve had my heart broken a thousand times and I’ve also broken a thousand hearts. So there are also songs that I sing as if the person who I fucked up with is singing it to me. ‘Soy Peor’ doesn’t signify that I’m worse; it signifies that she’s worse because of me,” he shares.

With Benito’s relationship with Carliz being his longest, and possibly the most meaningful, it’s likely that Vicente is right about many of El Conejo Malo’s songs referencing this specific ex. However, as a self-described lover and heartbreaker, Bunny himself admits that his tracks are inspired by several past and current romances, and the only one who could identify which emo bop is for which lover is, well, Benito.

Read: 7 Crucial Lessons On Self-Love, As Taught By Body Positive Trapero Bad Bunny 

Life Lessons We Never Learned In School: How to Peel a Mango

Culture

Life Lessons We Never Learned In School: How to Peel a Mango

Latino blood runs a juicy, vibrant mango orange. All I know, is that everyone and their mother had at least one to twelve mango trees in their backyards in Miami. You couldn’t eat them fast enough or find a mercado that wanted to buy them from you. Latinos get creative, though, so, yes, we had mango upside down cake, mango pie, and too many mango smoothies.

Even though we had an abundance of mangos, we’re Latino and wasting food is a cardinal sin. Every non-Latino friend thinks we’re crazy, but we’re putting it in writing. This is how you peel a mango.

The strategy depends on the mango.

Here in Los Angeles, the “Champagne” mango, or more lovingly referred to as the Mexican Mango, is King. They’re more local, ripe and tasty than any other mango in this part of the country.

First, peel from the opposite end of the belly button.

I know you know what I mean. The belly button is the spot where the stem used to be. Flip it over and don’t you dare pick up a knife. You’re peeling the mango with your hands.

Then, peel all the skin off like a banana.

Some folks like to peel the skin nearly to the bottom and eat it like a banana, holding the base of the mango with the skin on it. Maybe it’s a little less messy but not nearly as fun.

This small extra step is for the perfectionists:

Credit: Saya Jujur / Youtube

We all know that peeling like a monkey without a tool is more fun, but the skin isn’t going to peel all the way down to the bottom every time. Maybe this way is more satisfying for the people who like the videos of flubber being cut up a hundred different ways.

Regardless, you’ll end up with a naked, intact, juicy mango.

We’re not slicing and dicing and eating with a fork. That’s wasteful.

We’re biting into the fruit of the gods with our god given teeth.

Eating cubes of mango is the most unnatural, unsatisfying task after enjoying this spiritual experience. Latinos know.

For reference, we only do this around the inner circle.

It’s messy AF, and if you don’t need a shower by the end of your mango, you’re not doing it right. It’s carnal and it’s pure.

Then, you suck off the rest of the mango off that seed.

The degree to which there is still mango left on the seed is the ultimate judgement by your tías. You’re an ingrate if you leave any bit of morsel on the seed, and you’re given a sloppy slap on the back if you eat till it tastes bitter.

For the Miami Mango, it’s custom to absolutely not peel the mango.

@Boeknowzz / Twitter

First, you slice the mango twice alongside each face of the seed. You’ll be left with two halves and the seed. Then, you hold the halves like the bowl of fruit that it is and bite into it, making sure to not bite all the way through the skin. You’re basically scraping the mango out with your teeth. Every now and then you use your teeth like scissors to bite away the skin and make room to properly enjoy your mango.

Some folks like to cut cubes into the halves of the mango and then turn it inside out.

@SRKsMohini_ / Twitter

Admittedly, it does make the teeth-scraping process easier and less messy. We’re offended if you eat it with a fork though.

Other folks just slice the mango halves like apple slices.

@Ashkhan0345 / Twitter

That’s the best of both worlds. The corners of your mouth don’t get roughed up from a huge mango half rubbing against it and you get the whole juicy experience.

Regardless, this is how we eat our mangos. Punto.

@HII_NAL / Twitter

Only three mangos were harmed during the creation of this culture-affirming post. We’re wide-eyed and sloppy and unapologetic about it.