Entertainment

#mituFIT: No Excuses! It’s Time for a Mind & Body Makeover

We created #mituFIT because we’re fat. OK, that’s not quite right and not very nice, but Latinos, like a large swath of the U.S. population, are overweight. Problem for us? Our obesity rate is higher than whites — 44.4 percent vs. 32.8 percent — and our rates for diabetes and stroke are also higher. Scary, yes, but it’s not a death sentence. Enter the #mituFIT Challenge, a wellness program to make yourself fit and have fun during the process.

What It Is

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Photo Credit: lzf / iStock

#mituFIT Challenge is a body and mind makeover that’s as simple as getting up in the morning. All you need is the desire to get fit. Swap some meals for healthier options, and get moving with some basic fitness routines. The goal is to improve your fitness by summer, but it all starts with today.

Why You Need #mituFIT

comida
Photo Credit: svedoliver / iStock

The numbers show the obesity rate for Latinos, both men and women, is higher than that for whites. Combine with being overweight and it jumps to more than 77 percent, according to a Trust for America’s Health report. 13.2 percent of Latinos over age 18 have diabetes compared with 7.6 percent of over-18 Whites, while Latinos, Mexican Americans in particular, suffer 43 percent more from stroke.

Running Out Front

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Photo Credit: mitú Network

Helping to lead the #mituFIT Challenge is Yovana Mendoza, or “Rawvana” to you and me. Rawvana is a Mexican-American from San Diego and a raw food advocate. She studied at the Living Light Institute and the Institute of Integrative Nutrition and her aim is to “spread the message of health.”

How It Works

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Photo Credit: klenova / iStock

The #mituFIT Challenge is designed to motivate you with easy routines for exercise, nutrition and overall wellness. The program runs from March to May and will feature daily challenges, videos and social media posts. Rawvana has solicited the help of some friends and influencers, who will also be taking the challenge to help motivate you every step of the way.

Who Is In

Looking good! ???????? Poniéndome a tono para empezar el reto #MituFit con todo ????????

A photo posted by Maiah Ocando (@maiahocando) on

The Pot of Gold

potofgold
Photo Credit: IakovKalinin / iStock

What’s in it for you? Aside from feeling better, possibly dropping a pound or two and regaining your overall health, there is a prize — a trip to Mexico. To be eligible to win, you must do all challenges, take pictures and upload to social using #mituFIT.

The Timing of #mituFIT

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Photo Credit: Dirima / iStock

Now’s the time to get started on your health. While the program has been in the “warm-up” phase for the past couple of weeks, the challenge officially begins on Monday, March 16.

The Social Web

Credit: mituLIFE / YouTube

Weekly videos in English and Spanish will air on YouTube with Rawvana. Influencers are sharing challenge acceptance videos to their Facebook pages and mitú’s Instagram will feature “swap-it” pictures. Recipes, exercises and more swap-its will be posted to mitu’s Pinterest while mitú’s Vine will provide an insider, behind-the-scenes look.

Stay Connected

La caminata del día de hoy y una vista preciosa! #mitufit #ejercicio #subidita A photo posted by Cris Ordaz (@mymakeupcorner) on

Recipes

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Photo Credit: IgorDutina & juliedeshaies / iStock

Swapping is an essential piece to #mituFIT because food is not only the fuel to your success, but the vehicle to get you through the challenge. With #mituFit you’ll learn to make small, but significant changes to your diet, such as swapping cinnamon tea for your morning coffee, or opting for carob powder instead of chocolate, even reaching for stuffed peppers instead of chips.

Workouts

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Photo Credit: warrengoldswain / iStock

Whatever you put in, you have to burn off. Exercise is another integral component of this challenge. Workouts will include simple sit-ups or squats, even jumping jacks, push-ups and burpees. It’s about movements that you can do anywhere.

Challenges

¿cómo va el calentamiento para el reto #mituFIT? ¿todo el mundo listo para este próximo lunes?

A video posted by MiTú Network (@mitunetwork) on

Communicate

Where to Find #mituFIT

YouTube Videos in English

YouTube Videos in Spanish

Instagram

Twitter

Facebook

Vine

Pinterest

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

English National Ballet Is Streaming Frida Kahlo Ballet ‘Broken Wings’ For Quarantined Fans

Fierce

English National Ballet Is Streaming Frida Kahlo Ballet ‘Broken Wings’ For Quarantined Fans

National Opera Ballet

The life of Frida Kahlo has seen many stages. It’s been documented and analyzed in novels, essays, research papers. Depicted on screen and plays. Now, the English National Ballet is doing her colorful life justice with some “on pointe” treatment.

The world-class ballet company has launched ENB At Home, and as part of its new streaming series, will be releasing the Frida Kahlo-inspired production Broken Wings.

As part of their ENB streaming service, the company will showcase a new dance performance on its Facebook and YouTube channels for free for 48 hours. The first one to air will be tonight on Wednesday, April 22. First recorded at Sadler’s Wells in London in 2016, ‘Broken Wings’ will star lead principal (and ENB artistic director) Tamara Rojo as the painter. In the recorded ballet, Rojo appears alongside Irek Mukhamedov, who plays the role of Kahlo’s husband and fellow artist Diego Rivera.  

The story, which is choreographed by Annabelle Lopez Ochoa, tells the story of the Mexican artist’s life which was often riddled with pain and heartbreak. 

More of the streaming program will be revealed as time goes on. In the meantime, English National Ballet and various other ballet houses are currently closed. For now, many are running online ballet classes for fans self-quarantining at home.  

Frida Kahlo was a visionary Mexican artist born on July 6th,

1907 and passed on July 13, 1954. She lived a short, but quite eventful, 47 years of life. While Kahlo lived in Paris, New York, and San Francisco, Kahlo is known for being fiercely proud of her Mexican heritage, using dress to evoke political meaning.

To this day, her work inspires and resonates still with the queer, female and non-gender-conforming experiences.

1. Frida Kahlo is the OG Selfie Queen.

@jollenelevid / Twitter

Most people, when they think of Frida Kahlo’s artwork, think of her self portraits. During her life, her art was eclipsed by her husband’s, Diego Rivera. Only until after she passed and the Feminist Revolution erupted in the 1970’s did the public truly appreciate her refusal to be defined by anyone else, and her whole-hearted self acceptance, as depicted in her portraits.

“I paint self-portraits because I am so often alone, because I am the person I know best.”

2. Most of Kahlo’s paintings are not of herself.

@artfridakahlo / Twitter

Of her 143 paintings, 55 are self portraits and the other 88 are not. She actually painted mostly still-life images of fruit and flowers alongside political symbols.

What do you think of the porcelain blonde girl in the white dress peering over the bed of tropical fruit?

3. Kahlo was in a terrible bus accident when she was 18 years old.

@BestOfMx / Twitter

One September morning, Frida and her boyfriend boarded a bus that would collide with a train. Her boyfriend remembers the bus as “bursting into a thousand pieces.” A handrail ripped through Kahlo’s torso.

Later, he recounted, “Something strange had happened. Frida was totally nude. The collision had unfastened her clothes. Someone in the bus, probably a house painter, had been carrying a packet of powdered gold. This package broke, and the gold fell all over the bleeding body of Frida. When people saw her, they cried, ‘La bailarina, la bailarina!’ With the gold on her red, bloody body, they thought she was a dancer.”

The column here represents her fragile spine, which would cause chronic pain for the rest of her life.

4. While bedridden, Kahlo painted her first paintings.

@toadstool_house / Twitter

Kahlo broke her spinal column, collar bone, ribs, pelvis, fractured her right leg in 11 places, dislocated her shoulder and even lost her fertility. She would live in pain for the rest of her life, but her mother’s invention to arrange a special easel near her bed eased her pain.

5. Kahlo dreamed of becoming a doctor, but instead endured more than 30 surgeries in her lifetime.

@arthistoryfeed / Twitter

Before the accident, she suffered polio as a child and was pursuing medicine. The injuries from the accident forced her instead into grief over what was lost, especially her ability to bear children.

The accident irreparably damaged her uterus, causing several devastating miscarriages. Above is a self portrait titled Henry Ford Hospital, that depicts what she lost.

6. Kahlo preferred long skirts to cover her leg.

@fequalsHQ / Twitter

“I must have full skirts and long, now that my sick leg is so ugly.”

Her leg was left severely deformed from the polio, and modern doctors now think she may have also had spina bifida.

7. Her right leg was amputated at the knee towards the end of her life.

@artfridakahlo / Twitter

You can see how her right foot on the left is withered from the polio. Eventually it developed gangrene. The right is an image Frida drew in her diary. She tried to make light by writing, “Feet, why do I want you if I have wings to fly?”

8. Frida Kahlo’s father was German.

@toadstool_house / Twitter

Her father suffered a similar fate, moving to Mexico after epilepsy developed by an accident ended his university studies. Her mother was half Spanish and half indigenous Oaxacana.

9. Frida was born Magdalena Carmen Frieda Kahlo y Calderón, but dropped the ‘e’.

@SalvadorSalort / Twitter

Frieda comes from the German word “friede”, which means peace. Ironically, she dropped the ‘e’ in 1935 to avoid being associated with Germany during Hitler’s rule. 

10. Kahlo met her husband and famous muralist, Diego Rivera, in the Mexican Communist Party.

lupitovi / Pinterest

They met at a party, and she asked him to judge her work. He said that her paintings had “an unusual energy of expression, precise delineation of character, and true severity.”

Their relationship was volatile. He was 20 years older than her and immediately left his then second-wife to marry Frida Kahlo. Kahlo and Rivera divorced and remarried a year later. They both had extramarital affairs, Rivera having one with Frida’s sister.

11. Frida Kahlo was queer AF.

@GiuseppeTurrisi / Twitter

In all the ways, from her gender expression to her sexuality. She once said, “There have been two great accidents in my life. One was the trolley, and the other was Diego. Diego was by far the worst.”

Many historians now believe that Diego’s self-professed pride in being a womanizer is what gave her so much untold turmoil and pain.

But, soon things changed when she moved to Paris…

12. Frida Kahlo and Josephine Baker fell madly in love in Paris 1939.

“Frida Kahlo and Josephine Baker – a Fabulous Romance” Digital Image. MusArtBoutique. 6 July 2018.

Josephine Baker was working for the French Military Intelligence agency at the time, working against Hitler. Baker was also a singer, and both of them became famous in town for being openly bisexual.

13. Rare photos have surfaced showing Kahlo dressed in suits in family photos.

“Frida 2.” Digital Image. Bustle. 6 July 2018.

This picture was taken when she was 17 years old, just one year before the bus accident that would change everything. Frida Kahlo truly pushed the boundaries, and unapologetically so.

14. She even painted a self portrait of herself in a suit.

“Frida 5.” Digital Image. Bustle. 6 July 2018.

Her hair was in pieces all around her on the ground, and she held a pair of scissors to her groin. Historians always assumed it was a threat to Diego Rivera for his infidelity or some kind of message of self-hate.

15. Kahlo redefined Mexican mythology in her work.

@ransomcenter / Twitter

Monkeys are usually symbols of lust in Mexican and Colombian mythology, but Kahlo always depicts them as tender, protective symbols.

Perhaps a message to all of us recovering Catholics that there’s nothing threatening or inherently wrong about lust.

16. Kahlo’s “The Frame” was the first piece of Mexican art purchased by the Louvre.

@neongreece / Twitter

Her work, today, also garners more money than any other female artist. While she was alive, Pablo Picasso took an interest in her work, alongside other surrealists, to which she responded:

They thought I was a Surrealist, but I wasn’t. I never painted dreams. I painted my own reality.

17. Kahlo had several exotic pets…like monkey exotic.

@ReadingInHeels / Twitter

Pictured above is her fawn, Granizo. She also had a few Mexican hairless Xoloitzcuintli (that hairless dog breed that was coveted by the Aztecs), a pair of spider monkeys named Fulang Chang and Caimito de Guayabal, an Amazon parrot called Bonito and an eagle named Gertrudis Caca Blanca.

18. Kahlo arrived to her first art show in an ambulance.

Untitled. Digital Image. Lisa Wall Rogers. 6 July 2018.

During her last year of life, she scored her first solo exhibition in Mexico. Against doctor’s orders, Kahlo asked the ambulance to take her from the hospital to her exhibit, and she pulled up as if in a limousine.

19. At one point, Kahlo was force fed to keep her alive.

@Hamiltoniana / Twitter

Her many surgeries and illnesses brought a lack of appetite. Her doctor ordered that she be sent to bed rest and be fed a fattening purée of food every two hours.

The ladder depicted here is what she would use to paint from her bed, only to be replaced by a disgusting array of animal products.

On the back of the painting, she wrote: “Not the least hope remains to me…Everything move in time with what the belly contains.”

20. Kahlo has become a feminist icon.

@HarvardLibrary / Twitter

While during her life, she was known as the wife of Master Mural Painter Diego Rivera with a side hobby, she lived and painted the fullest expression of her self. Her paintings give deeply personal insight into the female experience, especially that of a disabled, queer experience during a time it was anything but OK to be that.

I am not sick. I am broken. But I am happy to be alive as long as I can paint.

21. Frida was born and died in the same house, Casa Azul.

@QatarandYonder / Twitter

Her home has since been made into el Museo de Frida Kahlo, in Mexico City. You can go visit the home that housed so much recovery, inspiration, and fearlessness.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

New CDC Report Tracks Activity Levels Of Adults And Puerto Ricans Are The Second Most Sedentary

Culture

New CDC Report Tracks Activity Levels Of Adults And Puerto Ricans Are The Second Most Sedentary

Jonathan Borba / Unsplash

A new Centers for Disease Control (CDC) report reveals that nearly half of Puerto Ricans get no exercise beyond walking to and from their cars and around the house. That’s more than three times the national average. The study concluded that the most significant factor in differences in the prevalence of physical inactivity was when controlled by race or ethnicity. Latinos were found to be the most sedentary (31.7 percent), marginally followed by non-Hispanic blacks (30.3 percent) with non-Hispanic whites having the lowest rate of physical inactivity at 23.4 percent. Respondents were classified as physically inactive if they responded “no” to the following question: “During the past month, other than your regular job, did you participate in any physical activities or exercises such as running, calisthenics, golf, gardening, or walking for exercise?” Every single state or territory found that more than 15 percent of adults were physically inactive.

The lack of physical activity leads to health problems that cost Americans $117 billion annually. The CDC is cautioning Americans, especially Americans of color, that a sedentary lifestyle contributes to 1 in 10 early deaths.

It’s unclear why Latinos and Black Americans are so singularly sedentary.

CREDIT: CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL

Some think that the cause is regional in nature. Americans concentrated in cities and urban areas are more likely to get exercise simply because of the proximity to exercise facilities and pedestrian commutes. The map above illustrates the inactivity levels of each state and territory for every American of every race and ethnicity. The South is significantly more sedentary than the North and the West regardless of one’s race or ethnicity. 

That said, when you look at the same states and factor for Latinidad, the statistics significantly worsen.

CREDIT: CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL

When race or ethnicity isn’t a factor, Oregon appears as one of the most active states in the country. When you look only at the Latinos living in Oregon, it becomes one of the worst in the country. That means that non-Hispanic white people either have more access to those gym memberships or faraway hiking trails or incorporate it into their culture more than Latinos living in the same area. 

It’s easy to assume the socio-economic factors at play here — that minorities are so disenfranchised that they simply don’t have the time or energy to exercise after their long or labor-intensive workdays. Latinas have the highest lifetime risk for diabetes across all demographic groups, according to non-profit Salud America! A small research study at the Fair Haven Community Health Center found that fear of injury and lack of energy were the most common barriers for Latina women. This is when the cultural trope of Latina moms being afraid for you to go too close to the freezer or you’ll catch pneumonia becomes pathological.

According to the CDC, Hispanic adults are 50 percent more likely to suffer from diabetes and liver diseases than non-Hispanic white adults. Inactivity and a sedentary lifestyle have been linked to diabetes meaning that the map of inactivity is bad news for Hispanics. A more sedentary lifestyle has a greater chance of developing type 2 diabetes and worsening the effects if someone already has the disease.

Meanwhile, when you look at just non-Hispanic white Americans, the map brightens up just as significantly.

CREDIT: CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL

“Too many adults are inactive, and they may not know how much it affects their health,” said Ruth Petersen, MD, Director of CDC’s Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity. “Being physically active helps you sleep better, feel better and reduce your risk of obesity, heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and some cancers,” she added in a media statement. The CDC has found that engaging in such physical activity could prevent 1 in 8 cases of breast cancer and colorectal cancer. 

The CDC is working to get more Americans to engage in physical activity for 25 minutes a day by 2027. In order to do this, the Surgeon General has called on cities to consider walkability as part of their city planning process. “Individuals and families are encouraged to build physical activity into their day by going for a brisk walk or a hike, walking the dog, choosing the stairs instead of the elevator or escalator, parking further away in the parking lot, walking or cycling to run errands, and getting off the bus one stop early and walking the rest of the way,” the federal agency said in a statement.

The study’s data came from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), an ongoing state-based, telephone interview survey conducted by CDC and state health departments. The maps used combined data from 2015 through 2018.

READ: Food, Culture, And Physical Activities Are All Factors In Latinos Being Most Likely To Develop Diabetes

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