Culture

The Paloma: Summer’s Coolest Cocktail

A Refreshing #LowCalCocktail

Move over margarita, this summer is all about the paloma.  The mix of grapefruit, lime and tequila with a splash of soda makes this citrusy cocktail a must at every summer fête.  Yvette Marquez from YouTube’s Muy Bueno serves up a low cal recipe swapping sugar for agave and concentrate juice or soda for fresh squeezed.  Now where’s that shaker?

WATCH: Classic Michelada for Summer

What’s your go-to summer drink? Leave a comment below to let us know.

Life Lessons We Never Learned In School: How to Peel a Mango

Culture

Life Lessons We Never Learned In School: How to Peel a Mango

Latino blood runs a juicy, vibrant mango orange. All I know, is that everyone and their mother had at least one to twelve mango trees in their backyards in Miami. You couldn’t eat them fast enough or find a mercado that wanted to buy them from you. Latinos get creative, though, so, yes, we had mango upside down cake, mango pie, and too many mango smoothies.

Even though we had an abundance of mangos, we’re Latino and wasting food is a cardinal sin. Every non-Latino friend thinks we’re crazy, but we’re putting it in writing. This is how you peel a mango.

The strategy depends on the mango.

Here in Los Angeles, the “Champagne” mango, or more lovingly referred to as the Mexican Mango, is King. They’re more local, ripe and tasty than any other mango in this part of the country.

First, peel from the opposite end of the belly button.

I know you know what I mean. The belly button is the spot where the stem used to be. Flip it over and don’t you dare pick up a knife. You’re peeling the mango with your hands.

Then, peel all the skin off like a banana.

Some folks like to peel the skin nearly to the bottom and eat it like a banana, holding the base of the mango with the skin on it. Maybe it’s a little less messy but not nearly as fun.

This small extra step is for the perfectionists:

Credit: Saya Jujur / Youtube

We all know that peeling like a monkey without a tool is more fun, but the skin isn’t going to peel all the way down to the bottom every time. Maybe this way is more satisfying for the people who like the videos of flubber being cut up a hundred different ways.

Regardless, you’ll end up with a naked, intact, juicy mango.

We’re not slicing and dicing and eating with a fork. That’s wasteful.

We’re biting into the fruit of the gods with our god given teeth.

Eating cubes of mango is the most unnatural, unsatisfying task after enjoying this spiritual experience. Latinos know.

For reference, we only do this around the inner circle.

It’s messy AF, and if you don’t need a shower by the end of your mango, you’re not doing it right. It’s carnal and it’s pure.

Then, you suck off the rest of the mango off that seed.

The degree to which there is still mango left on the seed is the ultimate judgement by your tías. You’re an ingrate if you leave any bit of morsel on the seed, and you’re given a sloppy slap on the back if you eat till it tastes bitter.

For the Miami Mango, it’s custom to absolutely not peel the mango.

@Boeknowzz / Twitter

First, you slice the mango twice alongside each face of the seed. You’ll be left with two halves and the seed. Then, you hold the halves like the bowl of fruit that it is and bite into it, making sure to not bite all the way through the skin. You’re basically scraping the mango out with your teeth. Every now and then you use your teeth like scissors to bite away the skin and make room to properly enjoy your mango.

Some folks like to cut cubes into the halves of the mango and then turn it inside out.

@SRKsMohini_ / Twitter

Admittedly, it does make the teeth-scraping process easier and less messy. We’re offended if you eat it with a fork though.

Other folks just slice the mango halves like apple slices.

@Ashkhan0345 / Twitter

That’s the best of both worlds. The corners of your mouth don’t get roughed up from a huge mango half rubbing against it and you get the whole juicy experience.

Regardless, this is how we eat our mangos. Punto.

@HII_NAL / Twitter

Only three mangos were harmed during the creation of this culture-affirming post. We’re wide-eyed and sloppy and unapologetic about it.

15 Carne Asada Recipes That Will Have You Drooling Before The End Of This Post

Culture

15 Carne Asada Recipes That Will Have You Drooling Before The End Of This Post

Maica

There are few hard and fast rules on how to make delicious carne asada. Over its long history as carnivorous Latinos’ favorite meaty treat, carne asada has been through many transformations. If you’re making carne asada for the first time there are three key things you must know. 

Sure your papa or tío probably shared their wisdom with you but here is our some of ours.

First, the cut of beef (skirt or flank) must be marinated and seasoned by a pro. Second, the meat must be cooked on a grill or skillet that’s so hot it screams. And third, the meat must be properly rested and thinly sliced before serving.

With the ground rules out the way, here are 15 carne asada recipes guaranteed to get you drooling before you know it.

1) The Simple Carne Asada

Credit: Mexican Food Journal

There are many ways to make a carne asada marinade but many swear by simplicity. At it’s most basic, a simple carne asada marinade is made from oil, salt, pepper, garlic, and lime juice. Nothing more. Let the meat chill in the marinade for at least 4 hours and return to room temperature before you slap it on the grill.

2) The Classic Carne Asada 

Credit: Isabeleats.com

There’s simple and then there’s classic. This carne asada recipe from Isabel Eats follows the recipe the author remembers from her childhood. To the oil, lime, garlic, and seasoning in the simple marinade above, Isabel adds a good handful of chopped cilantro, a chopped jalapeno, white wine vinegar, chilli powder, dried oregano, and cumin.

3) Carne Asada with a Citrus Punch

Credit: RainbowJewels at All Recipes

This crowd-sourced recipe for carne asada takes the basic carne asada marinade above and adds a whole host of other flavors, including a major glug of citrus juice. Lime juice, lemon juice, and orange juice go into this marinade, along with chopped chipotle pepper, coriander seeds and cumin. This recipe recommends flank steak or skirt steak and suggests you regularly massage the meat while it’s marinating!

4) Port Wine and Ginger Carne Asada

Credit: All Recipes

Ever thought about adding a ¼ cup of honey, some grated ginger and a cup of port wine to your carne asada marinade? Well now’s the time to give it a try! This recipe for flank steak with a port wine marinade is essentially port wine carne asada. Searing the meat on a smoking hot outside grill cooks the wine off nicely, leaving a sticky, sweet coating behind.

5) Spicy Carne Asada with Fish Sauce

Credit: A Spicy Perspective

According to the author, this Mexico-inspired carne asada from A Spicy Perspective is a fast, healthy low-carb meal. This recipe is also packed with flavor and easy to prepare. For this marinade, you need to add ancho chilli powder and habanero chiles to the usual ingredients like garlic, cilantro, and lime. These two types of chilli give the recipe a kick. But it’s the addition of fish sauce that adds a vivid umami flavor to the meat that will have your guests coming back to the grill for second and third helpings.

6) Carne Asada Tacos

Credit: Food Network

And now, a true Mexican rule to live by. If in doubt, put it in a taco. The Food Network recommends marinating your steak in a simple Mojo (marinade) that includes two tablespoons of white vinegar and a whole jalapeno for 8 hours. Any more and the meat begins to break down and loses its texture. Once cooked, pile the meat on top of warmed tortillas, sprinkle with lettuce, onion, and cheese and finish with Pico de Gallo salsa.

7) Roy Choi’s Carne Asada

Credit: NY Times

Now we’re going to get a little fancy with this take on carne asada from LA chef and Kogi BBQ founder Roy Choi. A number of ingredients set this recipe apart. Take the classic carne asada recipe, lose the cumin and oregano and add mirin, beer, chopped tomato, and onion. Roy recommends a coal-fired grill to get a good crisp on the outer edges of the meat.

8) Carne Asada with Soy Sauce

Credit: Damn Delicious

This popular recipe from Chungah at Damn Delicious keeps things simple but adds one key ingredient – soy sauce. Seasoning is a very important and every good carne asada cook has a salt grinder on hand. But soy sauce adds a richer flavor that cannot be achieved through salt alone. Chungah quite rightly uses flank steak and cooks the meat for only six minutes to keep the dish nice and rare.

9) Vegan Jackfruit Carne Asada

Credit: The Nut Free Vegan

For our vegan friends, this carne asada recipe replaces beef steak with jackfruit. Jackfruit is a tropical fruit native to South India that has a fibrous, meaty texture when cooked. Shredded jackfruit often pops up on vegan menus as an alternative to pulled pork but when doused in a spicy citrus marinade it can pass for a tasty vegan carne asada! This recipe recommends baking the jackfruit, rather than grilling it but throwing the marinated fruit on the grill should work just as well. 

10) Carne Asada Salad

Credit: Skinny Taste

Carne asada goes beautifully with fresh salad vegetables. This salad recipe from Skinny Taste shows you how to incorporate juicy strip steak into a fresh summer salad. The carne asada is treated to a simple marinade and grilled in the usual way. Once rested and sliced, the meat is thrown onto a bed of salad leaves, covered with homemade Pico de Gallo and doused with the juice of an entire lime.

11) Carne Asada Fries

Credit: Downshiftology

Everything in moderation. If you’re eating the salad, you can also eat the fries! To make carne asada fries, prepare a half portion of carne asada using the classic carne asada recipe above (number 2). Make a batch of fries; either from scratch using russet potatoes and a deep fryer or by short cut using oven fries. Sprinkle grated cheese and a teaspoon of paprika over the fries, pile on the carne asada and finish with a dollop of guacamole. Heaven.

12) Carne Asada Burrito Casserole

Credit: Claire Lower at Lifehacker

Trust Lifehacker to come up with a recipe you didn’t know you wanted. Essentially a layered casserole with carne asada and all the ingredients you’d need for a burrito cooked together in the oven, this carne asada burrito casserole is not elegant but it sure is tasty. 

13) Carne Asada con Rajas

Credit: James Ransom at Food52

Food52 enjoys its carne asada con rajas, which means carne asada with sliced peppers. The most refined recipe on this list, carne asada con rajas requires a fairly complex marinade that includes brown sugar, cumin, and ancho chilli powder. Once the steak has been marinated, cooked and rested, you can start on the rajas. Saute poblano pepper and onions in olive oil, add minced garlic then finish with fresh oregano and a dollop of heavy cream. 

14) Keto Carne Asada and Chimichurri

Credit; I Breathe I’m Hungry

If you’re following a keto, low carb, paleo or dairy-free diet, this recipe is the one for you. This keto carne asada marinadefeatures healthy ingredients like avocado oil, cider vinegar, and cayenne pepper and the side of Chimichurri sauce is much lighter than the usual sides of rice and tortillas. Net carbs per serving: 0g!

15) The Ultimate Carne Asada 

Credit:  J. Kenji López-Alt at Serious Eats

And to finish, the ultimate carne asada recipe from Serious Eats. This recipe combines everything we’ve learned from the recipes above and incorporates it into the ultimate carne asada experience. Three types of fresh chilli (ancho, guajillo, chipotle), a whole load of citrus, soy sauce and fish sauce go into this marinade. The result is a slab of grilled meat that’s buttery, salty, sweet and absolutely delicious.

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