#mitúORIGINALS

20 Women Who Changed Up Their Exercise Routines For Their Own Body Positivity Goals

Let’s face it: we stan a babe who has the drive to commit to healthy eating and an empowering exercise regime. Especially since it takes a hell of a lot of hard work to get ripped. So, we’ve put together a list of amazing pictures of Latinas who stood up to the trials and tribulations of their health goals for you to see.

And for good measure, we’ve also thrown in some facts about healthy eating and exercise.

A brain workout is still a workout, right?

1. It takes at least 2.5 hours of moderate physical activity per week to improve cardiovascular health.

Instagram / @orozcoe2000

A brisk walk is enough to do this! But, how can you tell if your walk is “brisk” enough? Experts say that you should have trouble trying to carry out a conversation with a friend – you might be able to talk, but you’d be breathless if you tried.

2. You still get benefits from a 10-15 minute burst of exercise.

Instagram / @notdrinkinhorchata

So yes, if you dance like no-one’s watching to a couple of bangers, that’s still going to do you some good! The important thing is that you raise your heartbeat.

3. Not doing exercise has some pretty serious risks for heart health.

Instagram / @gelicashrinks83

Sedentary lifestyles, or, sitting at the computer all the time and watching too much Netflix, makes it more likely that you’ll develop heart disease, get high blood pressure, and have raised cholesterol levels … and even make it more likely that you’ll have a stroke!

4. Studies show that people put on 4-6 pounds in the colder months.

Instagram / @sj_wllg

One theory is that we turn to comfort food once it starts to get cold. It probably doesn’t help that the cold weather makes us want to stay inside!

5. Drinking coffee before exercising can improve your performance.

Instagram / @ladiva_getshealthy

Caffeine has been found to improve sports performance at a rate between 2-16 percent! It’s best to drink coffee about 45-90 minutes before exercising, and you’d need roughly two cups to really feel positive effects. That being said, if you’re not much of a coffee drinker, to begin with, you could probably feel a benefit from just one cup.

6. There’s a formula for working out your maximal heart rate during exercise.

Instagram / @fit_evolving_nurse

The formula is: HRMax = 208 – (0.7 x Age). So, for a 22-year-old, their maximal heart rate during exercise should be somewhere around 192 beats per minute (BPM). If you train at a level that gets you to your maximal heart rate, then that’s enough to start inducing physiological change. That means you may lose weight, build muscle, and generally improve your overall health!

7. You can’t lose weight just by exercising.

Instagram / @mean_i_lean

You have to have a good diet, too! But, that doesn’t mean that you should suddenly invest in a bananas-only diet … or whatever the latest trend is. No, amigos, this means that you should look at eating more fruit and vegetables and having smaller portions of carbohydrates and red meat. And yes, those soft drinks are doing you no good.

8. Exercise reduces the risk of developing quite a few diseases.

Instagram / @stephanielugoblog

Beyond cardiovascular diseases and conditions, regular exercise can also curb the development of type 2 diabetes, dementia, and even some cancers by 30 percent!

9. Restricting carbohydrate intake close to endurance training sessions can help muscle recovery.

Instagram / @vmmart

Restricting carbohydrates is also linked to weight loss. However, it’s not necessarily the best thing for your body to stop eating carbohydrates altogether – taking carbohydrate restrictions to the extreme can result in ketosis. This can cause headaches, weakness, nausea, dehydration, and dizziness. The main thing to remember is that not all carbohydrates are made equal: wholemeal bread, pasta, and rice are more nutrient-rich than the white varieties. 

10. Yes, pregnant people can exercise.

Instagram / @healthgothchic

But, it should be done in consultation with a doctor. And, if anything like bleeding, contractions, amniotic fluid leakage, excessive breathlessness, dizziness, chest pain, and swelling happens, then it’s important to stop exercising immediately.

11. For professionals, exercising in warm conditions can improve performance.

Instagram / @vero_loses_it

But are you a professional? Chances are you’re not, so if it’s really hot outside, then make sure to stay cool and hydrated!

12. Eating food enables you to prepare for, and recover from, exercise.

Instagram / @lilye110_getsfit

So if you’re afraid you’re going to get hungry when you exercise, have a bite about an hour before you decide to go for a run!

13. The best kind of food to eat just before exercising is a small amount of carbohydrate food.

Instagram / @vicki_lugo

This is because it can be digested relatively quickly compared to fat- or protein-based foods, and won’t leave you feeling discomfort while you sweat it out.

14. The best time of the day to workout … depends on your circadian rhythm.

Instagram / @un_erika

Basically, if you’re a morning person and workout straight after waking up, then you’ll feel the benefits of eating less throughout the day and may even maintain weight loss. But, if you’re a night owl, you may find that that evening workouts will give you better results since you’ll be inclined to work hard during the night. Basically, listen to your bodies, babes.

15. Completing vigorous exercise just before bed can have benefits.

Instagram / @summergirl0804

Swiss researchers found that working out one-and-a-half hours before sleeping can encourage you to fall asleep faster, prevent waking up throughout the night, and improve your mood. 

16. Sex is a form of exercise.

Instagram / @jugosalatina_13

But unfortunately, it’s not the best kind of exercise if you’re looking to get real results. It gets your heart pumping, which is important. But, a solid bonk is about as good as walking gently for six minutes. So while it does get you moving, you can’t give up on exercising altogether just because you’ve been in bed.

17. An estimated 50 percent of people who start a new exercise program will give it up within six months.

Instagram / @nicollejthompson

The best way to make sure you stick to it is by making it a part of your routine.

18. “No pain, no gain” is a myth.

Instagram / @jazflete

While intensity is good for building fitness, pain is the body’s way of telling you that you need to stop what you’re doing, or you’ll do damage to yourself. If you’re feeling a lot of pain regularly from your exercise regime, you may have to change your routine.

19. “If you don’t use it, you’ll lose it” is not a myth.

Instagram / @pbbsuccess

Even if you feel like you’re not seeing massive gains from your exercise regime, the reality is that exercising regularly still maintains your fitness and health!

20. You gain muscle, you don’t transform it

Instagram / @beautiespcoslife

People often think that fat molecules turn into muscle but this is simply not the case. Fat burns and muscles grow.

He Underwent Nine Painful Surgeries To Correct His Cleft Lip And This Boy Is Raising $100K To Help Correct Other Children’s Left Lips

Things That Matter

He Underwent Nine Painful Surgeries To Correct His Cleft Lip And This Boy Is Raising $100K To Help Correct Other Children’s Left Lips

John Linton / YouTube

A very sweet 12-year-old boy in Centerville, Utah has taken it upon himself to pass on his own success story to children in Guatemala born with cleft lips and/or palates. His name is Jeffrey Linton, and he wants to raise $100,000 that would all go towards helping 400 children learn to smile and be understood by their peers.

Jeffrey Linton is all smiles about his project to get 400 more kids like him to be all smiles, too.

Credit: John Linton / YouTube

In a truly adorable video, Linton tells his audience how he had to “undergo nine painful surgeries to get as handsome” as he is now. Uncorrected, cleft lip and palates can cause chronic ear infections, difficulty eating, drinking and speaking.

In the video, we see a series of baby photos of Jeffrey as his cleft lip and palate were corrected.

Credit: John Linton / YouTube

“My first surgery was when I was only 10 weeks old and it was just a lip adhesion,” Linton says int eh video. “My cleft was wide enough that they thought it would help my muscles adjust to the repair if they did it in two stages. So although my lip was pulled together, I could still stick my tongue out above it. It looked like I was sticking my tongue out of my nose and I hear that everyone got a kick out of that.”

It’s been a long journey for the child, completed with speech therapy, and now, it’s time for him to give back.

Credit: John Linton / YouTube

Jeffrey’s second surgery was when he was just six months old. “I had a hard time recovering and my parents had a hard time knowing how much pain medication to give me,” Jeffrey told ABC. “But I came out of it with a repaired lip. They fixed my soft palate at 9 months and put ear tubes in to drain all the fluid in my ears.” It was crucial for his parents to be able to work with doctors for many years to continue his treatment.

“I want you to think about what it would be like if you couldn’t smile. It would change your life,” he tells the camera.

Credit: John Linton / YouTube

He had to go through all those surgeries but now says he “can smile, I can eat and just be happy the way I am.” He goes on to tell us, very enthusiastically, “I can’t imagine what my life would be like if I didn’t have those wonderful doctors that could have given me the surgeries that I need and those same doctors are going to Guatemala to help kids like me.”

Linton reached out to the Hirsche Smiles Foundation, which goes to Guatemala annually to operate on kids like him.

Credit: John Linton / YouTube

The organization is entirely focused on providing support to Guatemalans. It coordinates plastic surgery, dental and construction teams to offer a range of services, including cleft lip and/or palates.

All the doctors and nurses pay their own way to get there, so all the money goes directly to medical supplies.

Credit: John Linton / YouTube

HSF only works because of the volunteer surgeons, anesthesiologists, and nurses who donate their travel expenses and time to these kids. Of course, HSF still needs to raise money for the medical supplies required to perform the surgeries.

This 12-year-old actually pitched Holiday Oil “and they went for it.”

Credit: John Linton / YouTube

They’re donating a portion of their car wash sales made on July 13th to Hirsche Smiles Foundation. He wants to raise $100,000 and says that “Holiday Oil has done their part, and now you get to do yours.

If you’re near a Holiday Oil, you can get a car wash on July 13, 2019, to help support the cause.

Credit: John Linton / YouTube

A portion of the proceeds will go to HSF, and you’ll get your car washed while you’re at it!

Even better, you can volunteer to help out at the car wash and tell your friends to show up, too.

Credit: John Linton / YouTube

According to Jeffrey, “You could help collect donations and drying off cars and things,” if you show up to volunteer that day as well. 

Or, you can donate directly to the Hirsche Smiles Foundation.

 
Credit: John Linton / YouTube

A donation of $250 will pay for the cost of one surgery, and 100 percent of your donation will go towards expenses for the hospitals and supplies. It’s a worthy cause, y’all.

READ: Spurred By Anger At The Trump Administration, One Latina Entrepreneur Raised $9,000 For Migrant Children

Explaining Racial Trauma To A White Therapist Isn’t Always Easy, Here’s Why Seeing A Therapist Of Color Might Be Better

Fierce

Explaining Racial Trauma To A White Therapist Isn’t Always Easy, Here’s Why Seeing A Therapist Of Color Might Be Better

July is Minority Mental Health Awareness month, a time of year the U.S. Government designated to “bring awareness to the unique struggles that underrepresented groups face in regard to mental illness in the United States”. And with good reason.

Chilling statistics tell us that while 41.5% of children aged 12-17 received care for a major depressive episode, the percentage of minority children that received treatment is much lower, with 35.1% of black children and only 32.7% of Latino kids receiving care. The reasons behind this are varied. Not only are minorities more likely to be misdiagnosed and less likely to receive appropriate care due to clinician bias, but according to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, minorities are also “less likely to use community mental health services, more likely to use emergency departments, and more likely to receive lower quality care”, due to a variety of socioeconomic factors. We know that mental illness is a cultural issue that permeates every aspect of society, so the problem, then, lies in awareness, diagnosis, and treatment. 

The idea of consulting a therapist for professional help seems like overkill, a little foreign, and definitely a little scary. We’ve all head the common refrain: “Isn’t therapy for crazy people?”. Not at all. Therapy is simply a way of practicing self-care and should have no greater stigma surrounding it than going to the doctor for a check-up. In 2017, a study showed that 18.9% of adults in the U.S. had a mental illness. That’s 46.6 million people! Statistics like this simply prove how much therapy could benefit the population. 

Luckily, we live in a time where millennials are no longer as afraid of talking about their struggles with mental health or afraid of getting outside help to deal with them. According to a report by the Wall Street Journal, five times as many college students went to therapy in 2017 as compared to the years between 2011 and 2016. According to Peter Economou, a professor of Applied Psychology at Rutgers: “treatment has become de-stigmatized so people are more open to it”. But, we still have a long way to go. 

The Latino community, like many marginalized communities, is notoriously conservative when it comes to views on mental illness. As Twitter user @itsk80prince put it so perfectly: “talking about mental health in Latino families be like: “eres un emo?”. Many Latino families believe that problems should be discussed with a priest or maybe with your girlfriends during a round of chisme.

Before you start your search for a therapist, keep the following points in mind:

1. Do your research about their ethnic background and background in treating certain demographics.

There’s no shame in wanting a therapist who either looks like you or might come from a similar upbringing as you do. Often times, these are the therapists who can make us feel the most understood, related to and comforted. Having to explain racial trauma to a therapist who might not be able to relate or validate your feelings will undoubtedly bring you way more frustration in the end. “I’m a Latina who identifies as queer and started to see a white female therapist after I found myself going through a lot of depression while trying to get a job at a new company,” one woman explained to FIERCE in an interview. “All was well at first but after a while, I realized that talking about the frustrations I was experiencing were not being registered her accepted by her. For example, speaking to her about the frustrations of being interviewed by white men over and over again was okay but speaking about the racist microaggressions I would experience under my white female boss was always met with questions about why I thought my boss’s behavior was racist even at all. Ultimately I left her and started seeing a black female therapist who gets my situation so much more and I feel so much more validated.” 

2. Know the difference between a Counselor vs. a Therapist vs. a Psychologist

Counselors don’t require an advanced degree and, in fact, the term “counselor” kind of works as an umbrella term for therapists, social workers, and psychologists. Therapists, on the other hand, usually need a minimum of a Master’s degree in Psychology, Social Work, or Marriage and Family Therapy in order to call themselves a therapist. Psychologists are required to hold at least a Masters degree in psychology, with many opting for a doctorate.

3. Okay, so you want the Ph.D. Will you be needing a psychologist or psychiatrist? 

Newbies to therapy might not be aware of the difference between a psychologist and a psychiatrist, so it’s good to keep in mind the difference before starting your search. While a psychologist assesses, analyzes and observes your behavior in order to alleviate mental stress, a psychiatrist does all of the above and is also a licensed physician, meaning they can also prescribe medication, such as antidepressants. 

If you’re really struggling with depression, anxiety and/or psychosis and your mood makes it hard for you to function in day-to-day life, then your problems may be caused by a chemical imbalance. Medication might give you the extra help you need to get your mood back on track.

4. Do you want this time to be solo?

It may not come as a shock to you to know that many people consider relationships to be one of the most stressful aspects of life. Consider couples or family therapy as an option if you feel like you need help mediating inter-relational problems, or even if you’d just like an outside opinion on your relationships. Marriage and Family Therapists (MFTs) specialize in familial interactions and work on improving communication between family members. 

5. Identity matters.

Don’t feel guilty about preferring a therapist who understands first-hand the struggle that you go through on a daily basis. That means that if you prefer a therapist who identifies the same way as you do (gender, sexual orientation, race and/or ethnicity), it is completely within your rights to pick that therapist. If you’re more comfortable with therapist who specializes in LGBTQ+ issues or identifies as Latino, then that’s completely your choice.  

6. Utilize all of your resources. 

Remember, there have been so many people that have come before you that have been in your shoes. Don’t be afraid to ask for referrals from open-minded friends and family members. Also, know that there are tons of resources available to you online. The internet is chock-full of lists, databases, directories, and networks, all created with the express purpose of providing mental health care to Latino and marginalized communities. Databases like this can point you in the right director. Or even ask your healthcare provider to connect you with therapists who identify the same way as you do.

7. Take your therapist for a test drive. 

If you’re worried about committing to a therapist straight of the bat, ask for a trial session first so you know if you have chemistry (or have the possibility of building a rapport) with your mental healthcare provider. Sometimes, everything about your potential therapist can look great on paper, but once you meet in person, the connection just isn’t there. 

Once you arrive, ask yourself a few questions: Do you like the environment? Does this person feel easy to talk to? Do you feel comfortable around this person? Can you imagine revealing some of your most painful feelings to this person? All of these questions can help bring clarity to what you’re feeling.

8. Don’t be afraid to ask questions

It can be a little daunting the first time you step into a therapist’s office, especially when you expect your therapist to be the one asking you all of the thought-provoking questions. But, remember: this is your health, and you get to call the shots. Make sure you ask questions–what is the therapist’s approach? Psychotherapy? Cognitive behavioral therapy? Does your therapist use faith-based methods to supplement her practice? No question is too trivial, silly, or small to ask your potential therapist.

9. Make sure your therapist is licensed.

Last but not least, make sure your therapist is licensed by the state you live in. Becoming a licensed therapist is a strenuous process that involves a lot of schooling, clinical hours, and exams. So, although that man on the corner of the sidewalk giving out advice may have some interesting stuff to say, he’s probably not the best option for helping you get to your best self.

Paid Promoted Stories