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#mituFIT: Healthy Coffee Alternative

Cinnamon Tea with Coconut Water

Ingredients

2 cups of water

4 tbsp. coconut water

2 tsp. of vanilla extract

2 cinnamon sticks

Directions

1. Heat water until boiling.

2. Add 2 cinnamon sticks and slow boil for 5 minutes.

3. Remove from heat and let it rest for 3 minutes.

4. Strain the tea and pour into a large cup.

5. Add coconut water and vanilla extract. Stir and enjoy!

WATCH: #mituFIT: Nutritious and Simple Breakfast Swaps

Té de Canela

Ingredientes

2 tazas de agua

4 cucharadas de agua de coco

2 cucharaditas de extracto de vainilla

2 varitas de canela

Instrucciones

1. Pon agua a calentar hasta llegar al punto de ebullición.

2. Añade las varitas de canela y deja hervir durante 5 minutos.

3. Apaga el fuego y deja reposar otros 3 minutos.

4. Cuela el agua y sirve en una taza grande.

5. Añade las 4 cucharadas de agua de coco y el extracto de vainilla. ¡Revuelve y disfruta!

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Starbucks Changed Its Stance On Letting Baristas Wear BLM Apparel— These Black Coffee Shops Will Do You One Better

Culture

Starbucks Changed Its Stance On Letting Baristas Wear BLM Apparel— These Black Coffee Shops Will Do You One Better

southlacafe / Instagram

After receiving backlash from fans, Starbucks has had a change of heart on its position prohibiting employees from wearing apparel, such as T-shirts or pins, that support the “Black Lives Matter” movement. In a press release posted to employees, earlier this week the coffee giant revealed that it would not allow baristas to promote the moment. This is despite the fact that it has publicly supported “Black Lives Matter” on its social media channels.

In a new statement released on Friday, Starbucks said they felt it was “critical to support the ‘Black Lives Matter’ movement as its founders intended and will continue to work closely with community leaders, civil rights leaders, organizations, and our partners to understand the role that Starbucks can play, and to show up in a positive way for our communities.”

For many, us here at mitú included, Starbuck’s decision to allow its employees to promote the BLM movement by wearing paraphernalia associated with it is just a little too late. And certainly not enough.

If you’re looking to promote the BLM movement, we encourage you to do so by buying Black. The next time you crave some coffee forget Starbucks! Shoppe Black is a website that curates Black-owned places to buy from and they recently shared Black coffee shops to buy from.

Check some of them out below.

South LA Cafe 

(Los Angeles, CA) Get your coffee, tea, and healthy and affordable food options all here in this South LA spot.

Cuples Tea House

(Baltimore, MD) This family-owned business also produces tea that offers loose leaf teas, tea accessories, and tons of culture.

Kaffeine Coffee Internet & Office Cafe

(Houston, TX) Kaffeine Coffee is supposed to be a funky cafe that provides coffee, sandwiches, and baked goods.

Not So Urban Coffee & Roastery 

(Oxford, GA) According to Shop Black, Not So Urban is a small batch micro roaster specializing serving coffee sourced from Africa, South/Central America, and Asia.

Golden Thyme Coffee & Cafe 

(St Paul, MN) This coffee shop provides a setting with jazz music cakes and treats.

More Than Java Cafe’ 

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(Laurel, MD) According to reviews, More Than Java is a vibrant spot featuring classic cafe dishes and ice cream.

Amalgam Comics & Coffeehouse

(Philadelphia, PA) It’s not just a coffee store! Amalgam is also a comic book store that offers offers everything from comics, toys, games, and figurines. As well as baked goods!

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Coffee Is Steeped In Tradition Across Latin America, Here Is How Each Country Brews The Perfect Cup

Culture

Coffee Is Steeped In Tradition Across Latin America, Here Is How Each Country Brews The Perfect Cup

David Carillo / Getty

OK, so we’re in like Week 12 of lockdown and some of us may have taken up new hobbies and interests to help pass the time. For me, that’s been getting to know a good cup of home-brewed coffee. Plus, the draw of a warm, delicious cup of coffee can definitely help you get your day started with that often much-needed shot of caffeine.

Many coffee experts agree, that now is the time to familiarize yourself with all the traditional coffee methods from around Latin America and figure out which one you like best.

Latin America is one of the biggest producers of coffee beans, but surprisingly, coffee isn’t a big part of life here, with the exception of Cuba, Brazil, and Argentina. But those who do enjoy their coffee, have a wide array of traditions when it comes to preparing that perfect cup.

Like the millions of people and cultures of the world, coffee too has its own variations and traditions surrounding it. Here is a glimpse of how it is prepared and consumed in different ways all over the planet.

Argentina

Credit: thatgaygringo / Instagram

Maté may be the official national beverage, but coffee drinking is a refined, lingering art in Argentina’s cafes.

The country’s capital, Buenos Aires, has always been Latin America’s coffee capital and long before any neighboring nation even knew of the existence of a ‘latte’, Porteños were sipping macchiatos (called lagrimas) and café con leche like it was nobody’s business. The city has always offered the best coffee in the entire continent – mostly due to its influx of Italian immigrants who brought with them the traditional techniques of coffee brewing.

Brazil

Credit: Mattheu Defarias / Getty

Unlike much of South America, coffee is very popular in Brazil, with many Brazilians preferring a cafezinho – a strong and very sweet coffee. And it kinda makes sense considering Brazil is the world’s largest producer of the stuff.

Coffee is consumed all through the day, in dainty little cups, with or without meals. Coffee added to a glass of milk is often served for breakfast to kids as young as 10 years old. Though American-style coffee culture and drinks are gaining popularity, walking while eating or drinking is a strict no-no in Brazil

Colombia

Colombia, known for its great, versatile coffee beans, likes its coffee black with lots of sugar, in small cups. It’s known as tinto and it will leave you awake for days…

Colombia’s coffee culture only recently got off the ground. Prior to 2003, the country’s best beans were only exported and Colombians only had access to the leftover beans. But this has changed and coffee culture is a huge part of Colombian identity.

Cuba

Cuba may be best known for the cafecito – or Cafe Cubano. This very strong drink is a type of espresso coffee that first developed in Cuba after Italians arrived in the country.

The Cafecito beverage is made by sweetening a shot with Demerara sugar, during the coffee brewing process. There are variations on the method including a variety of recipes. The Demerara sugar is traditionally added into the glass into which the espresso will drip so the sugar and espresso mix during brewing which is said to create a unique and smooth quality.

Guatemala

Credit: omgitsjustintime/ Instagram

Guatemalans aren’t huge consumers of coffee. And those who do drink coffee tend to drink it as much of the world does – as a latte or shot of espresso.

However, Guatemala is revered for its superior quality and complexity of flavors. It’s a step above the rest, because many coffee fincas (plantations) still harvest beans in the most traditional of ways. The nation’s highlands are where you’ll want to head and – luckily for you – where you can experience the country’s long-held passion for coffee and discover some of the most magnificent landscapes in the entire continent. The most popular region for coffee lovers to visit is Lake Atitlan, a spectacular area framed by three volcanoes.

Mexico

In Mexico, coffee is often brewed with cinnamon and sugar. The cinnamon and sugar aren’t merely added to the coffee after brewing, but they’re incorporated right into the brewing technique. The result is a coffee that’s at the same time sweet and spicy. 

Cafe de Olla is the national coffee drink and it varies from state to state but it’s definitely a must to try if visiting the county. But it’s also easy to make at home!

Venezuela

Credit: Unsplash

At one point, Venezuela rivaled Colombia in terms of its coffee production. However, those days are long gone and now the country produces less than 1% of the world’s coffee (since 2001). Although some Venezuelan coffee is exported, the vast majority is consumed by the Venezuelans themselves. 

Venezuela’s most renowned coffees are known as Maracaibos. They are named after the port through which they are shipped, close to Colombia. The coffee grown in the eastern mountains is called Caracas, named after the country’s capital. 

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