#mitúLIFE

When Moms Learn Slang

Teaching My Mom Slang

If you use lots of slang, your parents have probably stopped you mid-sentence to ask, “What did you just say?” Josh Leyva understands your pain. His mom’s slang game is weak – and she’s too uptight – so he decides it’s time to teach her some slang. As Josh goes through his list of slang, he realizes it’s not as easy as it seems. Can Josh Leyva’s mom learn a little slang or is she destined to be uptight forever?

READ: 15 #MexicanMomQuotes that Hit Really Close to Home

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Moms Are Sharing Videos Of How To Make Their Comida For Their Kids After A Mom’s Burrito-Folding Video Went Viral

Culture

Moms Are Sharing Videos Of How To Make Their Comida For Their Kids After A Mom’s Burrito-Folding Video Went Viral

Michelle Gonzaes / YouTube

Last week, California Polytechnic State University student, April Olvera posted a video sent to her by her mamá, and the video went viral, already wracking up nearly ten million views, and nearly one million likes in less than seven days.

Olvera, away at college, texted her mom, Silvia Dominguez, to say that she didn’t know how to fold a burrito, and her mom sent her a video that contained a soothing video-folding lesson.

While some couldn’t help but wonder why Olvera didn’t know how to fold a burro, her mamí’s special brand of cariño shown in the forty-second burrito-folding lesson was the focus of the comments that followed.

Other Latinas needed the lesson too!

Twitter

Another Latina Twitter user, couldn’t get over the way Olvera’s mother, Silvia, repeated the lesson.

Twitter

Two guys commented on Olvera’s mom’s soothing voice, but we think @carys_arsenic nailed it.

Twitter

And this guy too who points out Ms. Dominguez’s calm in the face of a world that seems to be coming apart at the seams.

Twitter

When Olvera told her mother that her video went viral and inspired so many positive comments, Dominguez said, “Maybe it’s not the burrito. Maybe it’s about family and love.”

Burrito-folding-lesson mom, Silvia Dominguez, speaks Spanish in the video, smiling the whole time, clearly happy to be able to help her daughter away at college with anything, using her own phone propped up on the counter to capture the lesson.

“Okay,” she says in Spanish, holding up a corn tortilla, “Imagine that this is my flour tortilla. Add what you’re going to use, fold it from this side, fold it from that side, and roll it. Did you see that?

And then she unrolls the burro and repeats the steps: It’s a circle. Fold it here, fold it here, and roll it. Nice! Okay, bye. I love you.”

We also like how Burrito-Folding-Lesson Mom is even helping grown-ass men.

Twitter
@rsencion
Twitter

And because imitation is the most sincere form of flattery, here’s a video made by the author for her son on his way to college in the fall.

Watch the video below.

READ: Yalitza Aparicio Brought Her Mother To The Oscars And Other Incredible Things Latinas Did Last Night

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

10 Slang Phrases That We Hope to Never See Again in the New Decade

Entertainment

10 Slang Phrases That We Hope to Never See Again in the New Decade

etaj_stan / Instagram

Slang gets a bad rap from older generations who think us young folk are too lazy to reach for a thesaurus. But what older people don’t know is that sprinkling our vocabulary with bright and shiny slang words is a creative exercise. Why say something straightforward when you can embellish it a bit with a fun phrase or two? But like any new object, when something is played with too much, it loses its initial allure. 

\Recently, pop culture writer Joe Berkowitz asked his Twitter followers what slang words from the 2010s they hoped to never see again with the dawning of the new decade.

From “slay” to “spirit animal” Berkowitz’s 20,000 followers had no problem sharing the slang words they’d be happy to leave behind in the 2010s. We compiled a list of the top 10 most liked and retweeted options. Take a look at some of the winners below!

1. Slay

Twitter seems to largely agree that the term “slay” has become over-used and over-exposed in the latter years of the 2010 decade. However, other Twitter users were arguing that it only became over-used when it was appropriated by the mainstream from largely POC and LGBTQ communities. “Nope,” said Twitter user @ShrimpLingSoup. “The black lbgtqia community will decide when slay dies, just like they decided the time for #slay to be born”.

2.  On Fleek

The slang term “on fleek” was invented by Kayla Newman in 2014. It quickly went viral and everyone from Ariana Grande to Sir Patrick Stewart was getting in on the action. Unfortunately, it’s possible for slang to become distinctly un-cool once it’s used too much. We vote for this phrase to be left behind in the 2010s.

3. Slaps

Twitter user @leowulv is tired of hearing the phrase “slaps” as a way to describe something that is mediocre at best. “Saying something “slaps” when it’s deemed to be generally very good” he said on Berkowitz’s Twitter thread. “I guess it was fine when talking about a song but I def. have heard ppl say stuff like ‘damn, this burrito straight slaps’ and… just no”.

4. Adulting

“Adulting” is a term millennials invented to describe their disillusionment around the transition from childhood to adulthood. As millennials began to grow older and pay taxes, get their oil changed, and buy checkbooks all by themselves, they began to celebrate their small victories online by calling these small wins “adulting”. Quickly, a wave of criticism was leveled at the term for celebrating behavior that many considered just doing the bare minimum in life.

5. Stan

The user of the word “stan” as a way to say you’re a fan of something “makes me want to murder people,” says Twitter user @Limeylizzie. And while we agree that the word is pretty over-used, we have to admit that we’ve been guilty of heavily relying on this word ourselves sometimes.

6. Clapped Back

“Clapped back” is a phrase that was born out of necessity. The internet has given birth to a culture of online haters and public shaming. All this hate has made it necessary for people (usually celebrities) at the receiving end of criticism  to have an opportunity to respond to hate. Thus, the “clap-back” was born. But, what used to be a term of empowerment has become hokey and outdated.

7. Spirit Animal

“Calling a thing that is not an animal your spirit animal. Likeee saying @lizzo is your spirit animal. No, Lizzo is a person,” says Twitter user @K_Trappp. “You can look at a baby giraffe and say ‘hey that’s my spirit animal’ but not with humans!”

8. “I did a thing”

People started using the phrase “I did a thing” especially in the captions of their Instagram posts to describe pretty much…anything. Twitter user @PrairieDawn2011 hates this phrase “especially when ‘the thing’ is getting like an inch of hair cut off”. We agree that people can be a bit more creative when describing current events in their lives.

9. Bae

Bae, which comes from the acronym “Before Anyone Else” became woefully overused in the 2010s. Everything from one’s actual S.O. to a delicious burrito was described as “bae”. As Twitter user @deidralouisee so eloquently put it: “As a whore for linguistics and social changes around language evolving, and evolving forms of communication- I love all generational slang BUT bae can kiss my ass”.

10. Karen

In the 2010s, “Karen” became shorthand for an annoying lady who used her white privilege to her advantage at the expense of others. However, it became tired after people start using the phrase at the end of every sentence in order to add some humor to an otherwise humorless statement. “Dropping a random woman’s name because you can’t think of a joke, Karen”

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com