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The 9 Most Ridiculous Myths My Abuelita Swears By

I love my abuelita with all my heart, and I know she always has my best interest in mind. But now that I’m older, I’ve realized some of the lessons I’ve grown up hearing don’t really make much sense…

You’ll see what I mean:


1. Your hair will fall off if you go to sleep with it wet.

Credit: 20th Century Fox / Giphy

“Después cuando estes calva, no vengas a llorar aquí.”  You’ve been warned, I guess?


2. Walking outside with wet hair will give you pneumonia.

Credit: NBC / Julep

*Gasp* “¿¡Vas a salir con el pelo mojado?!” Basically, wet hair will destroy your entire life.


3. If you’re out after dusk without a scarf covering your nose, you will get sick.

Credit: RihannaVEVO / Tumblr

“Ponte la bufanda.”  Ain’t nobody got time for that.


4. Feel cold? It means you have low blood sugar.

Credit: Disney / Bustle

“Cómete un dulce. Tienes frío porque esta bajo en calorías.” I mean, sure. Any excuse for sweets.


5. Walking barefoot gives you tummy aches.

Credit: Fox / Simpsonworld.com

“Ve, por no ponerte zapatos.” Science.


6. Your stomach hurts because you’re hungry.

Credit: VH1 / Tumblr

“Cómete un pan.” Yeah, this stomach ache is definitely from eating too little and NOT because I just had three servings of cake.


7. Don’t leave the house on Good Friday, or the Devil will get you.

Credit: Disney / Tumblr

“¡El Diablo está afuera!” You sure he doesn’t have somewhere more important to be?


8. If you don’t sleep under the covers, you’ll get sick.

Credit: American Zoetrope / Giphy

“Debajo del cobija de lana.” Okaaaaay.

And finally…


9. Vicks Vaporub literally cures everything

Credit: LeJuan James / YouTube

“Ponte vivaporu!” Ok, so maybe this one’s a little bit true.


Read: 7 Home Remedies From My Colombian Abuelita (That Actually Work)

Does your abuela have any hilarious myths that she lives by?  We want to hear them! Comment them below.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

From COVID To Elections, Here’s Why Misinformation Targets Latinos

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From COVID To Elections, Here’s Why Misinformation Targets Latinos

One of the big surprises of the 2020 election was how even though most Latino voters across the U.S. voted for Joe Biden, in some counties of competitive states like Florida and Texas, a higher-than-expected percentage of Latinos supported Donald Trump. One factor that many believe played a role: online misinformation about the Democratic candidate.

Another important subject that’s been victim of a massive misinformation campaign is the Coronavirus pandemic and the ongoing vaccination program. But why does #fakenews so heavily target the Latino community?

Since the 2020 campaign, a large misinformation campaign has target Latinos.

Although fake news is nothing new, in the campaign leading up to the 2020 elections it morphed into something more sinister – a campaign to influence Latino voters with false information. The largely undetected movement helped depress turnout and spread disinformation about Democrat Joe Biden.

The effort showed how social media and other technology can be leveraged to spread misinformation so quickly that those trying to stop it cannot keep up. There were signs that it worked as Donald Trump swung large numbers of Latino votes in the 2020 presidential race in some areas that had been Democratic strongholds.

Videos and pictures were doctored. Quotes were taken out of context. Conspiracy theories were fanned, including that voting by mail was rigged, that the Black Lives Matter movement had ties to witchcraft and that Biden was beholden to a cabal of socialists.

That flow of misinformation has only intensified since Election Day, researchers and political analysts say, stoking Trump’s baseless claims that the election was stolen and false narratives around the mob that overran the Capitol. More recently, it has morphed into efforts to undermine vaccination efforts against the coronavirus.

The misinformation campaign could have major impacts on our politics.

Several misinformation researchers say there is an alarming amount of misinformation about voter fraud and Democratic leaders being shared in Latino social media communities. Biden is a popular target, with misinformation ranging from exaggerated claims that he embraces Fidel Castro-style socialism to more patently false and outlandish ones, for instance that the president-elect supports abortion minutes before a child’s birth or that he orchestrated a caravan of Cuban immigrants to infiltrate the US Southern border and disrupt the election process.

Democratic strategists looking ahead to the 2022 midterm elections are concerned about how this might sway Latino voters in the future. They acknowledge that conservatives in traditional media and the political establishment have pushed false narratives as well, but say that social media misinformation deserves special attention: It appears to be a growing problem, and it can be hard to track and understand.

Some believe that Latinos may be more likely to believe a message shared by friends, family members, or people from their cultural community in a WhatsApp or Telegram group rather than an arbitrary mainstream US news outlet; research has found that people believe news articles more when they’re shared by people they trust.

Fake news is also impacting our community’s response to the pandemic.

Vaccination programs work best when as many people as possible get vaccinated, but Latinos in the United States are getting inoculated at lower rates.

In Florida, for example, Latinos are 27% of the population but they’ve made up only about 17% of COVID-19 vaccinations so far, according to an analysis by the Kaiser Family Foundation. And Latinos are relying on social media and word-of-mouth for information on vaccines — even when it’s wrong. There’s myths circulating around the vaccine, whether you can trust it and the possible the long-term effects.

And it’s not just obstacles to getting information in Spanish, but also in many of the native Mayan indigenous languages that farmworkers speak in South Florida.

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Watch This Video Called ‘Project Abuelita’ About COVID-19 and Try Not To Cry

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Watch This Video Called ‘Project Abuelita’ About COVID-19 and Try Not To Cry

Screenshot via YouTube

Slowly but surely, the COVID-19 pandemic is winding to a close. If you’ve been following the news closely, you know that the CDC has given the go-ahead for fully-vaccinated people to gather indoors without social-distancing or having to wear a mask.

This is especially good news to those of us who haven’t had close-contact with our family members in over a year.

Unfortunately, many Latinos are suspicious of the COVID-19 vaccine–especially the older, less-informed generation.

Luckily, the Ad Council has partnered with ad agency Pereira O’Dell to create a marketing campaign called “Project Abuelita”.

“Project Abuelita” is a campaign aimed at encouraging older Latinos to get vaccinated. The campaign is part of the Ad Council’s Vaccine Education Initiative. And as a side note, we dare you to watch the minute-long video and try not to cry.

The video shows an abuela cleaning her home and getting dressed. She has knick-knacks and sentimental mementos around her house, like kids’ drawings and family photos. The doorbell rings and the abuela greets her daughter and two grandchildren.

The children, visibly excited to see their abuelita, hesitate to touch her. But after their mother gives them the go-ahead, they rush into her arms. The abuela looks overcome with emotion as she is finally able to hug her grandchildren for the first time in ages.

Despite COVID-19 hitting the Latino community particularly hard this past year, Latinos remain skeptical about the safety of the new vaccine.

According to a poll conducted by the Kaiser Family Foundation, only 26% Latinos said they would get the vaccine as soon as possible, compared to 40% of white people. 43% of Latinos said they would “wait and see”.

Latinos aren’t skeptical of the COVID-19 vaccine for no reason. There are multiple historical incidents where the U.S. government has exploited people of color and Latinos in the name of “health”. Like when U.S. Public Health service purposefully exposed unknowing Guatemalan prisoners to syphilis in order to record its symptoms. And unfortunately, there are many other examples.

But the COVID-19 vaccines are nothing to be afraid of. Scientific consensus is that the vaccines are safe. Not only that, but getting vaccinated will help us get back to our normal lives.

The “Project Abuelita” video is for a free service of the same name that the Kern County Latino COVID-19 Task Force launched.

According to a press release, the service will utilize bilingual volunteers to reach out to the elderly, monolingual Latino population to help with vaccination efforts. The volunteers will schedule testing, vaccination appointments and follow-up appointments.

As Jay Tamsi, co-founder of the Kern County Latino COVID 19 Task Force says: “Our abuelitos need us more so now than ever in setting up their vaccination appointments solving transportation issues, and helping them make sense of our changing ways.”

Find out more about Project Abuelita here.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com