Culture

Stressed Out? Reasons You Should Have Chilled in College

We freaked out, lost sleep and even cried because we were so stressed out in college – only to find out none of it was worth our tears. Here is why we should have chilled.


Major Commitments

The unhappy physicist
Photo Credit: quinnanya/Flickr

Yeah, getting a degree matters, but major don’t. Only 27 percent of college grads end up in jobs related to their major. If only you knew that before.

Flying the Coop

Outdoor Living
Photo Credit: j_benson/Flickr

You threw fits to live in a swanky apartment like all the cool kids and not at home. Looking back, you wish you had saved on rent by living with the parentals.

Nailing It

5b17d648395f795514a867eae0a27ce2
Photo Credit: Warner Brothers / DailyFailCenter.com

Grades are important, but so is being well-rounded. Thank god for that summer volunteer program that showed your employers you had experience.

READ: Why Parents Freak Out About College

Hit the Snooze Button

Registration desk sign
Photo Credit: 56675543@N08/Flickr

An early registration date seemed crucial for getting into the classes you needed. Why did you panic? Someone ALWAYS dropped and you were able to swoop in.

Sleepless All-Nighters

Study
Photo Credit: juditk/Flickr

Not that studying isn’t important, but pulling all-nighters before an exam was never worth it. Being blurry-eyed and jittery were not helpful.

READ: 9 Mistakes to Avoid After College Graduation

Not Having a Perfect 4.0

final grades
Photo Credit: Sean MacEntee/Flickr

A GPA is something to brag about or hide from parents…but no one has cared post-graduation.

THE Life Plan

16161646480_9416b022b7_z
Photo Credit: Post Memes/Flickr

Five, 10 and 15-year life plans are exhausting to create and maintain. Being flexible in the real world is much more zen.

Job Track

Fortune Cookie - Job
Photo Credit: 124247024@N07/Flickr

Some people have jobs out college. Good for them. Reality is, about 83% of grads don’t…for now.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

A Judge Has Ruled That The University of California System Can No Longer Use SAT And ACT Tests For Admissions And It’s A Huge Win For The Underprivileged

Things That Matter

A Judge Has Ruled That The University of California System Can No Longer Use SAT And ACT Tests For Admissions And It’s A Huge Win For The Underprivileged

Kevork Djansezian / Getty

Advocates against the use of standardized tests for college admissions have long argued that the use of such exams sets back students from underprivileged backgrounds and those who have disabilities. Aware of the leg up it gives to privileged and non-disabled students an advantage in the admittance process, they’ve rallied for schools to end such practices.

And it looks like they’ve just won their argument.

A judge has ruled that the University of California system can no longer use ACT and SAT tests as part of their admissions process.

Brad Seligman is the Alameda County Superior Court Judge who issued the preliminary injunction in the case of Kawika Smith v. Regents of the University of California on Tuesday. The plaintiffs in Kawika Smith v. Regents of the University of California include five students and six organizations College Access Plan, Little Manila Rising, Dolores Huerta Foundation, College Seekers, Chinese for Affirmative Action, and Community Coalition.

In his decision, Judge Seligman underlined that the UC system’s “test-optional” policy on UC campuses has long given privileged and non-disabled students a chance at a “second look” in the admissions process. According to Seligman, this “second look” denies such opportunities to students who are unable to access the tests.

The decision is a major victory for students with disabilities and from underprivileged backgrounds.

News of the decision comes on the heels of the university system’s ruling to waive the standardized testing requirements until 2024.

In May, a news release asserted that if a new form of a standardized test had not been developed by 2025, the system would have to put an end to the testing requirement for California students. On Monday, the judge’s ruling took things further by banning the consideration of scores from students who submit them all together.

“The current COVID 19 pandemic has resulted in restrictions in the availability of test sites,” Seligman wrote in his ruling. “While test-taking opportunities for all students have been limited, for persons with disabilities, the ability to obtain accommodations or even to locate suitable test locations for the test is ‘almost nil.'”

A spokesperson for the University of California said the university “respectfully disagrees with the Court’s ruling.”

“An injunction may interfere with the University’s efforts to implement an appropriate and comprehensive admissions policies and its ability to attract and enroll students of diverse backgrounds and experiences,” the spokesperson said. According to the spokesperson, the UC system is considering further legal action in the case. The system said that its testing has allowed for an increase in admission of low-income and first-generation-to-college-students for the fall of 2020.

With UC being the largest university system in the country, Seligman’s ruling is a massive deal. Students and advocates have long fought for the elimination of these standardized tests arguing that they do not accurately reflect a student’s academic ability.

“Research has repeatedly proved that students from wealthy families score higher on the SAT and ACT, compared to students from low-income families,” reports CNN. It’s important to note that the analysis by Inside Higher Ed revealed that the “lowest average scores for each part of the SAT came from students with less than $20,000 in family income. The highest scores came from those with more than $200,000 in family income.”

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

‘Glee’ Creators Have Announced A College Fund They Are Creating For Naya Rivera’s Son

Entertainment

‘Glee’ Creators Have Announced A College Fund They Are Creating For Naya Rivera’s Son

Gregg Deguire / Getty Images

There are still a lot of questions surrounding Naya Rivera’s sudden and tragic death. The 33-year-old actress is survived by her young son Josey and the creators of “Glee” are coming together to help his future.

“Glee” creators Ryan Murphy, Ian Brennan, and Brad Falchuk have announced a college fund for Naya Rivera’s son.

Josey Hollis Dorsey, who is 4 years old, was with his mother when she tragically died on Lake Piru in Ventura County, California. Since the discovery of Rivera’s body, the cast and creators of “Glee” have shared touching tributes to the actress and singer.

“Our hearts go out to her family, especially her mom Yolanda, who was a big part of the ‘Glee’ family and her son Josey,” reads the statement by the three creators. “The three of use are currently in the process of creating a college fund for the beautiful son Naya loved most of all.”

The statement comes with the backdrop that Rivera sacrificed her own life to save her son.

According to the official autopsy, Rivera’s cause fo death was drowning in Lake Piru. The actress had rented a pontoon boat for her and her son to enjoy some time together on the lake around the 4th of July holiday. According to officials, Rivera made the ultimate sacrifice for her son.

“She mustered enough energy to get her son back onto the boat, but not enough to save herself,” Ventura County Sheriff Bill Ayub said in a press conference, according to CNN.

Her former “Glee” classmates remember Rivera as a loving and kind person.

It is clear that Rivera left an indelible mark on everyone she worked with. Her passion for life and her craft is evident in the constant outpouring of love from friends, family, and costars as they continue to try to make sense of the tragedy.

Rest in peace, Naya.

READ: Queer People Are Shouting Their Gratitude For Naya Rivera’s Trailblazing Character Santana Lopez

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com