Entertainment

Cars. Who Gives a Sh*t?

Not millennials. With car shuttle services like Uber, this demo is less motivated than ever to buy their “dream car.”

“Millennials don’t give a sh*t about cars,” said venture capitalist Bill Gurley at a conference at SXSW adding that this generation “view[s] cars a a utility, not as a social statement.”

According to Gurley, whose Benchmark Capital is an investor in Uber, the company is growing 300% year over year. How could it not? The $40B company gives millennials just about every reason NOT to spend money on their own car.

Make It a Double Because, Why Not?

"This margarita mix is delicious." -Jeremy #uberfiesta #itsfiveoclocksomewhere

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When You’re Too Hungover to Make Breakfast

Spend Your Money on Something Cooler than Insurance

Bonjour, @uber_paris. #TakeMeThere

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Ride Like a Rapper

They Deliver Puppies and Kitties!

Get High

Here's a shot from one of our #UberCHOPPER riders! Demand is high, but keep checking back as more open up ?

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Parking Can Be a B*tch

Do you use Uber or Lyft? Tell us what you like most about the services. 

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Uber Says It May Shutdown In California As It Fights Against Gig Worker Law

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Uber Says It May Shutdown In California As It Fights Against Gig Worker Law

Mark Ralston / Getty Images

Is it possible that you won’t be able to get an Uber or Lyft in California? Well, it’s actually very likely that your apps won’t work much longer. The two companies are threatening to go dark in the Golden State as the two fight back against AB5 – a state law that offers protections to gig economy workers.

Uber says that they’ll need to rethink their entire business model if forced to follow AB5, hence the likely shutdown. But many find it suspicious that the company will be shutting down through the November election, when voters will be asked to vote on Prop 22, a ballot measure that would exempt Lyft and Uber from the new regulations.

An Uber shutdown is looking more likely in California as the company plans its response to new state laws.

All the drama started when California (among some other states) started enacting ‘gig worker’ protection laws that were meant to force companies like Uber to reclassify drivers as employees. Currently, drivers are classified as ‘independent contractors’ and are not eligible to receive any benefits, such as healthcare, retirement plans, and overtime.

Uber moved to limit the impact of that law while also admitting that change was needed to better protect their drivers. Not too long after Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi published an op-ed in The New York Times with the headline “Gig Workers Deserve Better,” a San Francisco judge ruled that Uber and Lyft had to reclassify their drivers as employees within 10 days.

In his ruling, Schulman wrote of Uber and Lyft, “It is high time that they face up to their responsibilities to their workers and to the public.” He rejected the argument that Uber and Lyft are simply technology companies, asserting “drivers are central, not tangential, to Uber and Lyft’s entire ride-hailing business.”

Two days later, Khosrowshahi responded with an ultimatum: If Uber had to abide by California labor law, it would require a business model change so extreme the entire company would have to pull out of the state until November. Which is convenient, since California has an initiative in the November election that would overturn much of the state’s gig economy law.

The shutdown would be used to fight back against a recent gig economy law that Uber says would eat away at profits.

Over the last five years, several states have enacted legislation against Uber and Lyft’s operating methods. The companies have come to rely on a tried and tested playbook: threaten to suspend service in the area. The threat, which the companies would sometimes follow through on, appeared designed to rile up customers and drivers, and put more pressure on lawmakers. And it often worked: look at Austin, TX.

Now, both Uber and Lyft say they are once again considering suspending service to get what they want. They say they may suspend their operations in California as soon as this week while simultaneously pushing for a referendum in November to exempt them from the law, known as AB-5.

Although the pandemic has reduced demand, a shutdown would largely impact Black and Brown communities.

Credit: Mark Ralston / Getty Images

Although the companies are planning on going dark in the next week or so, many industry experts don’t think the shutdown will have the impact they hope for. The pandemic has greatly reduced demand for ride sharing as people are staying at home and many more are working from home.

However, much like the pandemic itself, the shutdown would likely have an outsized impact on Black and Latino communities – two groups who have largely come to reply on the companies for commuting to and from work or school. Several studies have shown that Black and Brown workers make up the majority of ‘essential workers’ – so many don’t enjoy the privilege of working from home.

An Uber or Lyft shutdown would force many of these workers back on to buses and trains, further putting already impacted communities under increased risk for contagion of the virus.

The companies are betting on a November ballot initiative to help bail them out from new regulations.

Credit: Mario Tama / Getty Images

Although a judge has tried to force the companies to follow the law – the legal system may not have the last word. Uber and Lyft are counting on California’s voters to help them circumvent AB5, which went into effect in January and makes it more difficult for companies to use independent contractors. Uber and Lyft built their respective businesses on the concept of using freelance drivers who aren’t eligible for traditional benefits like health insurance and paid leave. 

Earlier this year, the companies, along with DoorDash, raised nearly $100 million to place a question on the November ballot. They succeeded, and this fall, voters will be asked to permanently classify ride-hailing drivers as independent contractors. The measure, called Proposition 22, also directs the companies to adopt certain labor and wage policies that fall short of traditional employment.

To help build support, the companies are turning to their customers. Lyft has taken a very active approach with urging its customers to vote yes on Prop 22 – they’ve emailed them and added pro-Prop 22 messages to the app. Meanwhile, Uber is considering similar tactics to ones the company used in 2015 in New York, when the company added a pop-up feature in its app to troll the mayor of New York City and encourage the company’s customers to pressure him to back off on proposed legislation that could seriously hamper Uber’s growth efforts in the city. It worked, and Mayor Bill de Blasio relented.

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Lyft Driver Dumps Racist Passenger At Their Starting Point After Racist Tirade

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Lyft Driver Dumps Racist Passenger At Their Starting Point After Racist Tirade

Rideshare Madness / YouTube

The COVID-19 pandemic has exposed a lot of about the people around us. We have figured out who was cannot live without, who we don’t need anymore, and who does and doesn’t believe in facts and science. It has also brought up a lot of racism that the U.S. still needs to deal with.

One Lyft driver got an earful of racism from an angry passenger who doesn’t believe in COVID-19.

The video starts with the driver making his way to the pick-up location for a new ride. As he arrives, he slides on a mask and the passenger gets in the car. The conversation goes from 0 to 60 with the racism after the passenger decides that his freedoms are being threatened because of the mask.

Driver: “By any chance, do you have a mask?”

Passenger: “No. I don’t.”

D: “Do you mind to put your shirt up here [motions to face]?”

P: “I can.”

D: “That would be really appreciated.”

P: “Do you believe in that sh*t?”

The driver says he does believe in COVID-19 because he has family members who have gotten sick from the virus. Meanwhile, the man in the back of the car is covering his mouth with his hand. The passenger than continues to let him know that he does not believe the government saying that there is a deadly virus spreading.

Things quickly escalate as the passenger starts to say that he doesn’t like the driver. The driver asks if he wants to end the ride, of course, the passenger doesn’t want to. However, the driver decides that he has had enough.

P: “I’ve got a contract with you so I’m going to ride with you.”

D: “Nope. The contract ends right now.”

The driver then takes the passenger right back to where he started and refuses to move the care until the passenger leaves. The passenger continues to argue with the driver long after the driver has ended the trip and tells him to leave the car.

Then things turn racist when the passenger starts to verbally attack the driver for his accent. The one part he really holds onto is the “b” sound when the man says in the video. It wasn’t long after that that the passenger followed it all up with the most common attack: claiming the driver is not from this country.

Watch the full video above and watch the whole exchange.

READ: Racist ‘Karen’ Strikes Again: Smashes In Her Neighbor’s Car And Tells Them To ‘Go Back To Mexico’

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