Entertainment

Finally, Latinas with DDs Can Feel Sexy Under Their Clothes

Being a Latina with big bubis, tetas, chachas, or however you want to call them is not easy… and trying to find a bra that resembles anything but two fabric costales is even harder.

Latina’s with bubis size DD or larger know the stress is legit when trying to find something sexy, comfortable and durable — did we say sexy? Yup, let’s be real, all big-chested Latinas can’t help but want to be and look sexy. Luckily, .Mic found Hips & Curves, Curvy Kate and Harlow & Fox, three brands that are making these kinds of bras available and explain why it’s so hard for other brands to do so.

“It requires years and years in technical skills,” Roisin Brodie from Hips & Curves said. Charlotte Davies, Curvy Kate’s head of design, adds “with regards to the cost, obviously the bigger size you go to, the more fabric per garment you are using.” And although the demand is big, it can be very costly to produce, which is why other brands have limited options.

But as Leanna Williams from Harlow & Fox put it: “We’re as complex and multifaceted as any woman of any other size, and we want to feel just as decadent and luxuriant when we feel like it.” So get to it Victoria’s Secret!

Read more about how these bras are becoming more popular here.

READ: This is How You Respond to Body Shamers

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A Woman Was Attacked By A Dog As Child– Now She Has Hair Growing Out of Her Cheek

Entertainment

A Woman Was Attacked By A Dog As Child– Now She Has Hair Growing Out of Her Cheek

E!

Over the course of its five-season run, fans of the E! series “Botched” have seen it all. The series follows doctors Terry Dubrow and Paul Nassif remedy the disasters at the hands of extreme plastic surgeries. Together the two doctors have the most bizarre scenarios in plastic surgery from a woman whose breasts morphed in a “uni-boob” after a botched job, to a woman whose face was filled with cement. Once, a patient showed up to the doctors with the desire to be transformed into an alien-look alike. In the most recent episode of the series, the doctors have their work cut out for them when a woman whose surgery left her with pubic hair sprouting from her face came on the show to ask for help. 

Crystal Coombs appeared on the show to have a surgery that she’d had at age 9 fixed for the good of her self-esteem.

Not too many years ago, a serious dog bite to the face would undoubtedly lead to extreme disfigurement for the rest of a person’s life. Today, doctors have been able to improve their techniques for patching up the results of these attacks all with the help of plastic surgery. For Coombs, who had been attacked and bitten by a dog decades ago when she was 9 years old, this proved to be very true. 

“When I was 9 years old, my grandfather was holding the dog, and I was actually pretty terrified of the pitbull,” Coombs told the doctors in the episode. “All I remember is black.”

“Full attack mode?” Dubrow asks her while Nassif asked, “So he bit out the chunk of tissue?”

“Clean,” Coombs replied. “Then went to the emergency room, and there the doctors suggested that we wait until we see a plastic surgeon.” 

At the time, Coombs had been left with a gaping wound which she told the doctors of “Botched” had been “open for a while. Like how the outside of Freddie Kruger’s face looks, with the burn? That’s what the inside looked like.” Fortunately, after some time, Coombs saw a plastic surgeon who was able to create a skin graft for her. With a complex procedure, he took skin from her groin and created the graft. Sadly, when puberty began for Coombs, so did another painful aspect of her scarring. 

“So you were getting pubic hair on your face?” Nassif asks her in the episode.

The answer? Yes. Yes, she did.

Coombs began to grow pubic hair on her face. 

“Yes. Literal pubic hair. I don’t believe that the doctor mentioned I would grow pubic hair out of my patch,” she explained while speaking to the doctors. “I don’t remember that.” Fortunately, Coombs seemed to have a bit of sense of humor about the growth of hair despite the fact that it was sprouting from her cheek.

Nassif later explained on the show that Coombs, while suffering from an odd predicament was lucky. “Crystal is very lucky that the emergency room physicians didn’t just try to stitch up that big gash and opening in her cheek because the ER doctor does not have the same skill set as a plastic surgeon,” Nassif explained. “If they did, she would’ve been like this–.” Nassif tugged his eye down to show what it might have looked like for her. 

Speaking to the doctors about the hair growing from her akee, Coombs explained that she had been fine with the growth before her daughter was born.

Coombs told the doctors that the odd graft hadn’t really affected her life or self-esteem until she became a mother. “Now since having my daughter, I really started to get conscious of it,” Coombs, who is the mother of a 6 months old, explained. “I’m worried about the kids that she’ll go to school with… “After having my daughter, I am very nervous about how other kids will treat her because of how I look. I don’t want her to be teased.” 

Coombs asked the doctor if they could help her with reconstructive surgery that would be as small and minimal as possible.

Dubrow later explained that the surgery needed to reconstruct Coomb’s face is “actually very deceptively complicated” because “that skin graft is very close to critical anatomical structures like the nose, the cheeks, and the eye, that if altered even a little bit can change the entire shape of the face and look very deformed.”

Eventually, the doctors performed the surgery for Coombs and the transformation was quite remarkable. 

Speaking about her end results, Coombs explained “Before, I was way too self-conscious,” Crystal recalled. “And now, I’m no longer worried about Sana having to go through 21 questions about what’s on my face. I’m excited, I feel beautiful…it’s like a closed chapter.”

Check out a clip from the episode here.

Slick Woods’ Stage 3 Melanoma Diagnosis Has Sparked a Conversation About Skin Cancer Among Communities of Color

Fierce

Slick Woods’ Stage 3 Melanoma Diagnosis Has Sparked a Conversation About Skin Cancer Among Communities of Color

slickwoods / Instagram

Fans of fashion model Slick Woods are in shock after the edgy alternative model took to Instagram last Wednesday to announce that she was going through chemotherapy. On November 20th, The Shade Room then exclusively announced that Woods was currently battling Stage 3 Melanoma and was “fighting for her life”. “At this time, we continue to pray for Slick’s health and that she’ll beat this disease,” The Shade Room said. “Her good spirit and will to fight is a testament to her strength and she’s certainly not alone in this fight given the outpouring of love and support from friends and fans all over the world”.

Woods’ initial hint towards her health troubles came from a photo she posted on Instagram last Wednesday. The photo was of herself, decked in a neon green ensemble, surrounded by friends and throwing her head back with her tongue sticking out. She captioned the photo: “How I feel about chemotherapy, shout out to everyone that gotta go through it #atleastimalreadybald”. 

The cancer diagnosis of the model, famous for being one of the faces of Rihanna’s Fenty Beauty line, has rocked the fashion world.

Friends and fans have flocked to Woods’ social media accounts to express their shock, grief, and support to Woods. No one expected a seemingly healthy woman of only 23-years-old to be faced with such a challenging health battle. On Woods’ photo, fans commented with supportive statements like “You got this Queen #wearesurvivors. You have my support” and “u got this. sending prayers & love ur way”.

The diagnosis is one in a long list of challenges that Slick Woods has had to face in her life. In the past, Woods has been upfront about her difficult past. Originally raised by a single mother, and then by her grandmother after her mother was incarcerated, Woods didn’t have a permanent home during her childhood. “I had a job, I had to do things I didn’t want to do, I saw a lot of s*** I shouldn’t have seen,” she told Evening Standard magazine. Once she was on her own, Woods revealed that she battled opiod addiction while living in a “traphouse”. She scraped together cash by running credit card scams. 

Woods’ diagnosis has sparked a conversation around the common misconception that people of African descent are somehow immune to skin cancer.

While statistics for skin cancer among people of African decent are lower with black people in the United States only making up 1-2% of skin cancer cases in comparison to white Americans who make up 35–45% of skin cancer cases, the truth is, anyone can get skin cancer, regardless of race. In fact, the survival rate of melanoma for people of color is lower, due to the fact that there is lower public awareness in communities of color and it shows up in less-likely places (like the soles of your feet).  “Melanin does confer some natural protection against the risk of skin cancers from UV, but everyone, of any complexion, is still at risk for sun-related skin cancers,” says dermatologist Dr. Andrew Alexis, the director of the Skin of Color Center in New York City. “There’s also just an overall lack of awareness that these cancers actually do occur in patients of color”.

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That body hurt huh #ugglife

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Slick Woods’ diagnosis and battle is a reminder to everyone why regular skin cancer screenings are so important. As for Woods, we respect her request to not be treated like a victim by her fans or the media during this time. Instead, we commend Woods for her bravery and honesty about a situation that is so personal to her. Her courage and forthrightness is inspirational.  

On Twitter, fans of Slick Woods have taken to the social media platform to process her shocking revelation. 

It’s natural that Woods’ diagnosis would spark such a large reaction on social media–the place where she largely rose to prominence.

This fan was effusive in her praise of Slick Woods as the paradigm of female power.

Woods’ battle with cancer is simply another reasons to recognize her as the icon that she is. 

This woman used Woods’ diagnosis as an opportunity to educate the public on the omnipresence of skin cancer.

Contrary to popular belief, skin cancer does not discriminate–everyone has the potential to be at risk, regardless of ethnicity.

This person is still processing the injustice of Woods’ diagnosis as a new mother.

It seems like just yesterday when Woods was sashaying down the catwalk with a full baby bump. Life is unpredictable.

This woman had nothing but good vibes and positive thoughts for the game-changing model.

The optimistic outlook is exactly the outlook that Woods is exemplifying on her own social media platforms.