Culture

9 Desserts Anyone Who Is Puerto Rican Will Recognize From Their Childhood

We know the scene well: walking into abuela’s house and seeing your favorite snack, all ready for you. Suddenly we’re all like…


Credit: Fox

YES, YES, YES. GIMME ALL THE SWEETS AND COOKIES.

If you grew up in a Puerto Rican household, these 9 desserts will bring back the memories! Try and get through this entire post without drooling.


1. Florecitas

Credit: Royal Borinquen / Sam’s Club

These devilish little iced cookies are the MOST ADDICTIVE THINGS IN THE ENTIRE WORLD. They’re easily purchased online or in certain grocery stores, and boy oh boy is it impossible to just eat one.


2. Flan

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Credit: Instagram / FlansNYC

Alright, this one’s a little obvious, but we’d be lying if we didn’t point out that this was always in the fridge at all times. This coconut custard cake is a staple in any Latino home, and Puerto Ricans really love it. 

3. Brazo Gitano

Credit: Franco & Co. / Facebook

Ahhhh yes, the perfect Sunday-after-church snack. After sitting through a ridiculously long mass, there’s nothing we wanted more than this delicious sweet roll. If you were a kid in a Puerto Rican household, your parents and grandparents likely enjoyed this with a delicious cup of coffee.

4. Mantecaditos

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Just looking at these cute little sprinkle-topped shortbread cookies will take you RIGHT BACK TO CHRISTMAS. They were always our go-to holiday cookie and always around growing up.


5. Tembleque

Credit: Instagram / gingerbreadco

This coconut dessert pudding has destroyed many a diet, but was always worth every bite. Cinnamon?! Coconut?! Are you describing heaven? Because it certainly sounds like it. This was a go-to for birthdays and, really, any random celebration.

6. Besitos de Coco

Credit: Instagram / actualidadgastronomica

Are you sensing a recurring theme? Coconut. Puerto Ricans love coconut y’all, and we aren’t afraid to admit it. These little cookies were always a favorite after-school treat. Whether homemade or store bought, #they #can #get #it.


7. Serenata Milk Chocolate Wafer

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Credit: Bingo / Amazon

Little chocolate wafers? Check! These would never last very long, but it didn’t matter when they were so good. Serenatas were always the best reward for making your bed. #BriberyWorks


8. Meringues

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CREDIT: Instagram / audrey78280

YAS YAS YAS. Meringues are basically little clouds in your mouth. Truly! It’s like if clouds were in dessert form. You could buy them in bulk and have cloud cookies on demand. PRAISE.


9. Bocaditos Cookies

CREDIT:  Fini  / dulcealmacen

And finally, rounding out the list of classic Puerto Rican desserts that we all remember from growing up: Bocaditos cookies. Marshmallow + cookies? YES. So. Into. These.

Be right back, going to lay in a puddle of my drool after going through this list. GET THEE TO A GROCERY STORE, STAT.


READ: Literally Just 11 Mouthwatering Gifs Of Latin American Foods

What are some desserts you loved growing up? mitú wants to know!

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Ricky Martin Opens Up On Being A Queer Latino And Talks New Music In Powerful New Interview

Entertainment

Ricky Martin Opens Up On Being A Queer Latino And Talks New Music In Powerful New Interview

Mike Windler / Getty Images

Ricky Martin has long been an international superstar – even long before ‘Livin’ La Vida Loca’ took over virtually every airway in the world. But it’s hard to deny that with that song, the Puerto Rican singer entered the global mainstream and ever since he’s been a pop icon.

From being one of the first major pop stars to publicly come out as gay, to acting in popular TV series, and getting married and becoming a father of four, Ricky Martin has always been a very busy man.

And despite a global pandemic that has forced all of us to stay at home and find a ‘new normal,’ Martin has forged a path forward. He recently sat down for an interview with Billboard to discuss everything from new music, the global Coronavirus pandemic, and his identity as an out and proud gay Latino.

Considering we’re all still living amid a global pandemic, the Billboard interview started on this very relevant topic.

Billboard points out that Martin and his family live in a very big and beautiful house in Beverly Hills, which likely makes staying at home a bit easier compared to the rest of us. However, Martin points out that he has a very loud home – with four kids and his mom all living under one roof. But he admits, “…I am very lucky. I am in a comfortable home where my kids can play.”

Ricky Martin is also working on new music. He released Pausa in May, and now as he works on new music the world is a very different place. He told Billboard: “I started working on my music maybe nine months ago. In my mind, the album was going to be called Movimiento, which means movement. But with all this [pandemic], it just told me… “The way it was, was not working. Let’s do it differently.” I have music with rhythm, but I was not going to tell people to move! So I named it Pausa.”

He also speaks about his close relationship with fellow Puerto Rican, El Conejo Malo.

Shortly after Billboard released its history-making cover with Bad Bunny on the the cover, Martin described San Benito as a “Latin queer icon.” Many people – of all backgrounds – took issue with that. But Ricky Martin tells Billboard that “allies are so important. Without them, our fight for equality is impossible. It really tickles me to see Bad Bunny as a gay icon — just like Cher could be. Why not?”

The Puerto Rican singer shared what his coming out experience was like and reveals he never tires of sharing it.

In the interview, Martin is very open about his coming out as gay. The singer came out as gay in 2010, married husband Jwan Yosef in 2017, and together the couple is raising four children.

Rolling Stone asked Martin, 48, what it was like to remain closeted during “the most public, exposed period” of his life.

“I had moments of extreme positivity, and not so positive [moments],” Martin answered. “Life was a bit on steroids in those days. Everything was really intense, but I could take it! I come from a school of military discipline when it comes to training for music, dance, and acting. I started when I was 12. So for me, it was about not being ready to open [up]. When you open an egg from the outside, what comes out is death. But when the egg opens from the inside, what comes out is life. It’s something that needs to come from within. Every time someone forces someone to come out, what you’re doing is you’re destroying the natural flow of the self-discovery.”

When asked what motivated him to come out publicly, Martin said that a kid somewhere in America needs to see positive headlines about coming out.

“Today I woke up to this beautiful headline that I know someone out there is in need of. The headline was something like, ‘I came out. And ever since I’ve been the happiest.’ Something like that, something… My heart is beating faster because I know today a kid somewhere in America woke up needing to hear those words. A lot of people say they get tired of talking about the same thing. Why would I? Are you kidding me? For so many years I had to keep it inside. And then the effect of someone… What people are getting from it in their healing process?”

Billboard also asked Martin his feelings on how the media is profiting and accepting Puerto Rican and Latinx culture.

When asked if he feels that the American media has gotten better or more open to understanding Puerto Rican culture, Martin responded: “We certainly have a long way to go, but the important thing is that we see that there’s an audience that is interested. And it’s up to us to bring [the] education.”

And he’s absolutely right. This year has seen several Latino artists rise to the top of all sorts of charts. Bad Bunny and J Balvin are among the most streamed artists globally and Bad Bunny is one of the most streamed artists on YouTube as well.

Meanwhile, Maluma and Jennifer Lopez are working on a film that will be out early next year. The Emmy’s, VMAs, and other award shows finally had decent representation of artists of color – particularly among the Latinx community.

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Mountain Dew Margaritas Are Apparently A Thing At Red Lobster Now?

Culture

Mountain Dew Margaritas Are Apparently A Thing At Red Lobster Now?

Matt Winkelmeyer / Getty

We’ve seen all kinds of takes on the timeless classic that is a Margarita. From frozen Margaritas to ones with cranberry juice and dashes of blue curaçao and twists of basil and ginger beer we’ve literally seen it all. Or so we thought.

Recently, Red Lobster announced that they’re doing a Mountain Dew-take on the beloved and salty tequila cocktail.

Red Lobster’s DEW-Garita promises to set you aglow.

The drink is the first official Mountain Dew cocktail and of course, it is bright lime green. While the cocktail’s recipe is being kept strictly under wraps, like everything at Red Lobster’s, it’s supposed to pair “perfectly” with Red Lobster’s iconic Cheddar Bay Biscuits.

“Red Lobster is thrilled to work with PepsiCo, not only because it has a great portfolio of brands, but specifically because of the food and beverage innovation possibilities,” Nelson Griffin,the Senior Vice President and Chief Supply Chain Officer at Red Lobster said in a statement about the drink.

Red Lobster’s DEW-Garita is due to debut at Red Lobster locations nationwide in September and by the end of 2020.

The Margarita is an iconic Mexican drink related to a drink called Rhe Daisy.

The classic Tequila sour cocktail is one of the most beloved cocktails in the world. According to Wine Enthusiast “One story claims that the drink was created in 1938, as Mexican restaurant owner Carlos (Danny) Herrera mixed it for gorgeous Ziegfeld showgirl Marjorie King. Supposedly, Tequila was the only alcohol that King would abide, so Herrera added lime juice and salt.”

To make your own classic Margarita check out this recipe below

Ingredients

  • Coarse salt
  • Lime wedge
  • 2 ounces white Tequila
  • 1 ounce orange liqueur
  • 1 ounce lime juice

Directions

Shake out coarse salt on a plate. Wet the rim of a glass by using the lime wedge. Press the rim of the glass in the plate of salt to coat. Add ice to the glass.

Fill a cocktail shaker with ice and add the rest of the ingredients. Shake well, and pour into the prepared glass over ice.

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