#mitúLIFE

7 Home Remedies From My Colombian Abuela (That Actually Work)

All my life I grew up practicing my abuelita’s remedies. They cured anything and made everyone more beautiful… according to abuelita. But when desperate times called for desperate measures, I was forced to try these health hacks again. Turns out, being first-generation Latina has its benefits. Do try these at home!

Sore throat? Try gárgaras de agua y sal con limón.

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Gargle warm, salted water with lemon to soothe your sore throat. Trust me, mi abuelita is practically a doctor. Works every time.

Stomach ache? Drink yerbabuena.

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Making a tea with this will fix an upset stomach in a punch. You should always have this sweet-smelling plant at home; it works even better than “sana sana colita de rana.”

Feeling meh? Boil aloe.

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When you’re sick, boil aloe leaves and the sickness will leave your house. My grandma tells me to drink it, but the way it purifies the air is enough for me. (Keep in mind, though, that aloe has also been called a cure-all for all sorts of dubious things, so just make sure to do your research before using it.)

A sea salt scrub will keep your skin smooth and silky.

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Making some Peppermint scrub!!

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Abuelita always brags about her silky-smooth skin. Her trick? Use an olive oil and sea salt scrub to slough away dead skin and lock in moisture. I like using it with lavender-scented essential oil!

Vitamin E is your best friend.

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Credit: Toho /  High Steaks

Abuelita swears by vitamin E. And she’s got a point. Evidence has shown that vitamin E can help reduce extra scar tissue from growing around a wound.  You can take it in pill form, or by eating a variety of foods, like seeds, nuts, and leafy green vegetables. (Just don’t place it directly ON a wound.)

Té de manzanilla isn’t just for drinking.

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Té de manzanilla, a true abuelita favorite, really can bring out the natural highlights in your hair.  Boil a tea bag let it cool, and then soak your hair.  Many Latin American supermarkets even sell a special shampoo de manzanilla, which also leaves your hair lighter.

Coughing up a lung? Try eucalyptus.

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Credit: Instagram / @skilladflorals

Eucalyptus can help ease a bad cough. Just make sure to dilute eucalyptus oil before ingesting it or placing it onto the skin. I like to use it dried leaf form, adding honey any time I make tea out of it.  As an added benefit, when you boil these leaves, your home smells like you’re at a spa.

READ: Types of Abuelitas Every Latino Has

I can’t believe I ever doubted mi abuelita’s Colombian healing ways.  Try them; I promise you won’t be disappointed.  Do you know any more natural remedies that help you?  Share them below!

Latinos In New York City Face More Layoffs Than Non-Latino Peers

Things That Matter

Latinos In New York City Face More Layoffs Than Non-Latino Peers

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The country is witnessing a high amount of mass layoffs across several industries in the face of the COVID-19 outbreak. Last week, 3.3 million Americans filed for unemployment, the highest number in history. Economists anticipate a 20 percent unemployment rate in the United States and some cities are already feeling the impact of these layoffs. In New York City, Latinos are facing more layoffs than their peers.

Latinos in New York City are facing higher levels of unemployment caused by COVID-19.

MSNBC Legal Analyst Maya Wiley tweeted about the foreseeable disproportionate impact these layoffs would have on minority communities. The tweet is ringing true as 41 percent of Latinos in NYC have been laid off from their jobs in response to the COVID-19 outbreak.

The Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy of the City University of New York conducted a survey with 1,000 participants. The survey found that roughly 4 out of every 10 Latinos in NYC have lost their job or someone in their household lost their job due to the health crisis. The survey found that 24 percent of white and Asian employees and 15 percent of Black employees reported losing jobs.

“It’s likely because the Hispanic community, many are in service jobs like restaurants or hotels,” Professor Scott Ratzan, a senior scholar at CUNY SPH, who led the survey, said in a statement. “We do the survey in English and Spanish, and [job loss is] higher among the Spanish-speaking community.” 

New York is the hardest-hit state in the U.S. with more than 30,000 confirmed cases of the virus.

New York state is facing the most extreme outbreak of the novel coronavirus when compared to the rest of the country. Governor Andrew Cuomo delivers an address to the media every morning and has told New Yorkers to brace for a serious viral outbreak. More than 30,000 New Yorkers have tested positive for COVID-19 and 325 deaths. Around 20,000 of those cases and about 280 of those deaths are in NYC.

Gov. Cuomo shared data that showed how the measures New York has taken to slow the spread is contributing to a slowing hospitalization rate. According to The New York Times, the hospitalization rate in New York state is slowing. On Sunday, the governor shared stat showing the rate doubling every two days. By Thursday, new data shows the hospitalization rate doubling every 4.7 days.

There are resources available for New Yorkers who are losing their jobs during the outbreak.

Some New Yorkers are reporting some delays in getting a hold of people in the unemployment offices. While the waits are long, it is worth being persistent.

According to NYC Emergency Management, there are several options for people who are being laid off during the COVID-19 pandemic. Unemployment assistance is available to everyone in New York state and the state has waived the 7-day wait period to alleviate the added pressures of COVID-19. Employees should know about the Shared Work program offered as an alternative to worker layoffs that provides some income assistance while workers have to work a reduced schedule.

The Office of Nightlife is also asking nightlife employees to fill out a survey about lost income in an attempt to help contractors, performers, workers, and business owners impacted by the closures.

READ: Latinas Are Sharing How They Protect Their Loved Ones From Coronavirus

Someone Turned Cardi B’s Coronavirus Rant Into A Remix Now It’s On The Billboard Charts

Entertainment

Someone Turned Cardi B’s Coronavirus Rant Into A Remix Now It’s On The Billboard Charts

Cardi B/ Instagram

Who knew Cardi B’s rants could be music to someone’s ears.

If you haven’t already heard, Cardi B went one very long Instagram rant about the Coronavirus pandemic and its global repercussions. Last Wednesday, the Dominican rapper posted a 46-second video on Instagram airing out her fears and grievances about the disease. Towards the end of the clip Cardi B delivered the lines “Coronavirus! S*** is real! S*** is getting real!”

Now it’s Billboard hit.

Over the weekend, the Brooklyn-based DJ iMarkkeyz chopped up the soundbite and released a track called “Coronavirus.” The bit has Cardi B’s rant on loop as a trap beat plays beneath it. It didn’t take long for “Coronavirus” to take off– the song we mean. The song broke into the pop charts internationally in Bulgaria and Brazil over the weekend and eventually began to climb the ranks of iTunes. By Thursday the song was top 10 in the United States iTunes chart.

You might think the song’s virality is just another schtick but uh uh.

Cardi B and iMarkkeyz have pledged to donate proceeds from streams and downloads to go towards those affected by Coronavirus.

According to Billboard “As preliminary reports indicated, the remixed tune ‘Coronavirus’ sold 3,000 copies in the week ending March 19, according to Nielsen Music/MRC Data. The sales total prompts a No. 9 debut on Billboard’s Rap Digital Song Sales and a No. 13 start on the R&B/Hip-Hop Digital Song Sales charts dated March 28. In addition, ‘Coronavirus’ picked up 626,000 U.S. on-demand streams in the same period”

Check out the new hit below!