7 Home Remedies From My Colombian Abuela (That Actually Work)

credit: E! / Mitú

All my life I grew up practicing my abuelita’s remedies. They cured anything and made everyone more beautiful… according to abuelita. But when desperate times called for desperate measures, I was forced to try these health hacks again. Turns out, being first-generation Latina has its benefits. Do try these at home!

Sore throat? Try gárgaras de agua y sal con limón.

Credit: Youtube / Giphy

Gargle warm, salted water with lemon to soothe your sore throat. Trust me, mi abuelita is practically a doctor. Works every time.

 

Stomach ache? Drink yerbabuena.

Credit: YouTube / Giphy

Making a tea with this will fix an upset stomach in a punch. You should always have this sweet-smelling plant at home; it works even better than “sana sana colita de rana.”

 

Feeling meh? Boil aloe.

Credit: Instagram / playing_plants

When you’re sick, boil aloe leaves and the sickness will leave your house. My grandma tells me to drink it, but the way it purifies the air is enough for me. (Keep in mind, though, that aloe has also been called a cure-all for all sorts of dubious things, so just make sure to do your research before using it.)

A sea salt scrub will keep your skin smooth and silky.

View this post on Instagram

Making some Peppermint scrub!!

A post shared by emilyandelizabeth (@esquarednaturalbeauty) on

Credit: Instagram / @esquarednaturalbeauty

Abuelita always brags about her silky-smooth skin. Her trick? Use an olive oil and sea salt scrub to slough away dead skin and lock in moisture. I like using it with lavender-scented essential oil!

Vitamin E is your best friend.

RpYTz
Credit: Toho /  High Steaks

Abuelita swears by vitamin E. And she’s got a point. Evidence has shown that vitamin E can help reduce extra scar tissue from growing around a wound.  You can take it in pill form, or by eating a variety of foods, like seeds, nuts, and leafy green vegetables. (Just don’t place it directly ON a wound.)

 

Té de manzanilla isn’t just for drinking.

Credit: YouTube / Giphy

Té de manzanilla, a true abuelita favorite, really can bring out the natural highlights in your hair.  Boil a tea bag let it cool, and then soak your hair.  Many Latin American supermarkets even sell a special shampoo de manzanilla, which also leaves your hair lighter.

Coughing up a lung? Try eucalyptus.

Screen Shot 2016-04-22 at 12.29.05 PM
Credit: Instagram / @skilladflorals

Eucalyptus can help ease a bad cough. Just make sure to dilute eucalyptus oil before ingesting it or placing it onto the skin. I like to use it dried leaf form, adding honey any time I make tea out of it.  As an added benefit, when you boil these leaves, your home smells like you’re at a spa.

READ: Types of Abuelitas Every Latino Has

I can’t believe I ever doubted mi abuelita’s Colombian healing ways.  Try them; I promise you won’t be disappointed.  Do you know any more natural remedies that help you?  Share them below!