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16 GIFs That Totally Capture A Latino Family Dinner

CW

If there’s one thing Latinos know how to do, it’s eat with family. It may sound like a breeze, but surviving a Latino family dinner is totally a rite of passage and something we’re groomed for from the time we emerge from the womb.

Here are 15 GIFs that totally capture a Latino family dinner.


1. You open the door and about a thousand of your cousins greet you.

Credit: MTV

Even though your face hurts from smiling and kissing all of them, you try to remain upbeat because you are hungry. The faster you get through this, the better.


2. Of course, everyone insists on calling you by your childhood nickname…

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Credit: Comedy Central

It doesn’t matter what you look like now, you’ll be Gordo / Flaca / Yoyi / Cabezón de Melón for the rest of your life.


3. Your abuelo insists you sit down next to him and watch “Primer Impacto,” even though dinner was supposed to start 20 minutes ago.

Credit: NBC

And of course he insists on talking throughout the entire show.


4. Your tía chismosa comments that you’re looking out of shape, and your entire family chimes in with their thoughts about it.

Credit: NBC

You summon strength you didn’t even know you had to calm yourself and not freak out.


5. By now you’re starving, but the chisme is flowing and no one in sight seems worried about when dinner is going to start.

Credit: Cuatro

At this point, you’d even eat your Tía Tati’s cooking — the same tía who’s managed to burn water.


6. Then the dreaded “mija/o, puedes ayudarme?” comes from the kitchen.

Credit:Paramount Pictures

Despite your brain screaming, “NO!!” you say, “Sure, abuela!” Because while it all seems harmless enough at first…


7. …You then proceed to be scolded about how you don’t know how to properly boil a pastele.

Credit: Netflix

OKAY, IN YOUR DEFENSE, MAKING PASTELES IS REALLY, REALLY HARD.


8. FINALLY! It’s time to eat! You feel like this:

Credit: JenniferLopezVEVO / Giphy

You’re truly so happy you could cry.


9. Oh right, except it takes about 20 minutes for everyone to stop fighting about where they want to sit at the table.

Credit: NBC

You deserve a damn gold medal for not losing your sh*t on every family member right now. (And for avoiding sitting next to that one gassy uncle.)


10. You then have to wait until all the older people are served, while fielding questions about when you’re going to graduate/get promoted/get married/have 2.5 kids.

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Credit: Vacilatelo

Weren’t family dinners supposed to be, you know, enjoyable? No?


11. Every five minutes, your mami, tías and abuela ask you if you’re enjoying the food they “slaved over.”

Credit: NBC

You calmly tell them it’s very delicious, all the while trying not to blow up.


12. You get scolded at least five times for using ketchup on your pastele. “You’re too Americanized!” they shout at you.

Credit: Disney Channel

You insist you didn’t mean to offend them, but by now it’s too far gone. Everyone’s offended and fighting.


13. You make it through dinner (finally), when your abuela says it’s time for dessert.

Credit: TBS

Hell. Yeah. There’s no way you can offend your family when eating flan!


14. This then leads to approximately 18 hours of “sobre mesa,” mostly spent talking about people you’ve never heard of.

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Credit: Lifetime

Who is Cousin Osvaldo, and why have we spent hours talking about his goiter?!


15. Of course, it then takes another hour-to-five months to say goodbye to everyone.

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Credit: IFC Films

Do I even really know all of you???


16. …And as you leave, your abuela asks you when the last time you went to church was.

Credit: Disney Channel

Wouldn’t be a Latino family dinner if your status with God wasn’t brought up at the last second! Ay dios mio.


READ: 18 Things That Happen When You Have a Huge Family

Can you relate? What happens when your family gets together for a big meal? And can we come? 

Alexis García Gamboa's Death Inspired Her Aunt's Open Letter About México's Femicide Crisis

#mitúVOICE

Alexis García Gamboa’s Death Inspired Her Aunt’s Open Letter About México’s Femicide Crisis

Facebook / Carmen García Núñez

On Sunday, April 17, Alexis Gabriela García Gamboa, a 17-year-old from Monterrey, México, was killed by her 23-year-old ex-boyfriend, Sergio Arturo Alanís. Alexis and Sergio were neighbors. She had known him her whole life. He shot her in the neck. Her mother and sister tried to protect her, but Sergio attacked them both. They’re now under hospital care. Sergio currently awaits sentencing.


Alexis and her sister Sharito were getting ready to see a cheerleading performance. As they were leaving, Sergio was waiting for them out on the street. Moments later, Alexis was killed.


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Credit: Flickr CC / Chakana Colectivo

Gamboa’s death adds to the rising tally of femicide cases in México. Femicide occurs when a man violently kills a woman because of her gender. The systemic roots of femicide cases derive from corruption and machismo. Too often, threats and violence against women are overlooked by Mexican authorities. Typically, these femicide victims had been abused and harassed by their killers in the past.


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Credit: Mitú / Alberto Urias


According to Humberto Padgett, author of Las Muertas del Estado, police and government authorities in México often blame women for their own murders. They believe that they’re “asking for it,” for reasons such as wearing short skirts, falling for the wrong guy, or because they are or work in the same parts of town as sex workers.


Alexis’ aunt, Carmen García Núñez, recently wrote an open letter about her niece’s murder, hoping to draw greater attention to these murders and encouraging women and their allies to do more when it comes to reporting violence and abuse.


“The last time I saw her…There was sadness inside of her. I don’t know. Like as if she was looking for something., as if she wanted to run from something. Now, I’m wondering, why didn’t I question anything then. Why hadn’t I intervened more?

Crying doesn’t comfort me. Understanding comforts me. Why do these things happen? Why are we harmed by the people who supposedly love us? Why does harm come from the people who supposedly love you? Why did Alexis love a troubled kid? Why didn’t she seek help? Why didn’t she believe in her fear? What can we do as parents to protect our daughters from this?

I think it’s about empowering women. Of knowing when to say no, and to report the attack the moment it happens.

Make a fuss. Yes, we must make a fuss when someone is being misogynistic or sick. Report it. Even if they call us “feminazis” or viejas arguenderas, or viejas locas. At this point in life, me vale madre whatever they say.

Yesterday, when I asked my cuñada, how are you? Dead, she told me. They took away my Alexis. Why live. I didn’t know how to respond. There are no words of comfort.”


You can read her original letter in its original Spanish on Facebook.


READ: YouTube Removed This Mexican Singer’s Music Video After People Criticized It For Promoting Violence Against Women

For help and information:

The National Domestic Violence Hotline

LoveIsRespect.org, a group that aims to “engage, educate and empower young people to prevent and end abusive relationships.”

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