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16 GIFs That Totally Capture A Latino Family Dinner

If there’s one thing Latinos know how to do, it’s eat with family. It may sound like a breeze, but surviving a Latino family dinner is totally a rite of passage and something we’re groomed for from the time we emerge from the womb.

Here are 15 GIFs that totally capture a Latino family dinner.


1. You open the door and about a thousand of your cousins greet you.

Credit: MTV

Even though your face hurts from smiling and kissing all of them, you try to remain upbeat because you are hungry. The faster you get through this, the better.


2. Of course, everyone insists on calling you by your childhood nickname…

Credit: Comedy Central

It doesn’t matter what you look like now, you’ll be Gordo / Flaca / Yoyi / Cabezón de Melón for the rest of your life.


3. Your abuelo insists you sit down next to him and watch “Primer Impacto,” even though dinner was supposed to start 20 minutes ago.

Credit: NBC

And of course he insists on talking throughout the entire show.


4. Your tía chismosa comments that you’re looking out of shape, and your entire family chimes in with their thoughts about it.

Credit: NBC

You summon strength you didn’t even know you had to calm yourself and not freak out.


5. By now you’re starving, but the chisme is flowing and no one in sight seems worried about when dinner is going to start.

Credit: Cuatro

At this point, you’d even eat your Tía Tati’s cooking — the same tía who’s managed to burn water.


6. Then the dreaded “mija/o, puedes ayudarme?” comes from the kitchen.

Credit:Paramount Pictures

Despite your brain screaming, “NO!!” you say, “Sure, abuela!” Because while it all seems harmless enough at first…


7. …You then proceed to be scolded about how you don’t know how to properly boil a pastele.

Credit: Netflix

OKAY, IN YOUR DEFENSE, MAKING PASTELES IS REALLY, REALLY HARD.


8. FINALLY! It’s time to eat! You feel like this:

Credit: JenniferLopezVEVO / Giphy

You’re truly so happy you could cry.


9. Oh right, except it takes about 20 minutes for everyone to stop fighting about where they want to sit at the table.

Credit: NBC

You deserve a damn gold medal for not losing your sh*t on every family member right now. (And for avoiding sitting next to that one gassy uncle.)


10. You then have to wait until all the older people are served, while fielding questions about when you’re going to graduate/get promoted/get married/have 2.5 kids.

Credit: Vacilatelo

Weren’t family dinners supposed to be, you know, enjoyable? No?


11. Every five minutes, your mami, tías and abuela ask you if you’re enjoying the food they “slaved over.”

Credit: NBC

You calmly tell them it’s very delicious, all the while trying not to blow up.


12. You get scolded at least five times for using ketchup on your pastele. “You’re too Americanized!” they shout at you.

Credit: Disney Channel

You insist you didn’t mean to offend them, but by now it’s too far gone. Everyone’s offended and fighting.


13. You make it through dinner (finally), when your abuela says it’s time for dessert.

Credit: TBS

Hell. Yeah. There’s no way you can offend your family when eating flan!


14. This then leads to approximately 18 hours of “sobre mesa,” mostly spent talking about people you’ve never heard of.

Credit: Lifetime

Who is Cousin Osvaldo, and why have we spent hours talking about his goiter?!


15. Of course, it then takes another hour-to-five months to say goodbye to everyone.

Credit: IFC Films

Do I even really know all of you???


16. …And as you leave, your abuela asks you when the last time you went to church was.

Credit: Disney Channel

Wouldn’t be a Latino family dinner if your status with God wasn’t brought up at the last second! Ay dios mio.


READ: 18 Things That Happen When You Have a Huge Family

Can you relate? What happens when your family gets together for a big meal? And can we come? 

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A ‘Father Of The Bride’ Sequel Is Officially Coming— And It’s Going To Be Super Cuban-American!

Entertainment

A ‘Father Of The Bride’ Sequel Is Officially Coming— And It’s Going To Be Super Cuban-American!

Break out the tres leches! It’s gonna be a wedding of “epic proportions!” Cuban-style!

That’s right, the beloved 1991 film Father of the Bride is getting a remake. This time, the film will star 64-year-old actor Andy Garcia, the patriarch of a Cuban American family, struggling to see his daughter walk down the aisle.

Garcia will star in and executive produce the upcoming Warner Bros. remake of Father of the Bride, a story that will follow a Cuban American family.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, Brad Pitt‘s production company, Plan B will produce the remake with Gaz Alazraki, director of Club de Cuervos, set to helm.

“I’m very excited to join The Father of the Bride, a beloved film that has brought so much joy to so many over the years and to represent my Cuban culture and heritage in this story,” Garcia explained in a statement published by THR. “I commend Warner Brothers for their foresight and celebrate this opportunity they have created.” 

Garcia’s remake is the latest in the franchise, which first came out in 1950 and starred actor Spencer Tracey and Elizabeth Taylor.

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer

The first film inspired a sequel, also starring Tracey and Taylor, called Father’s Little Dividend. The film was remade forty-years later with Steve Martin and Diane Keaton in the 1991 version. Garcia’s upcoming take will focus on a similar storyline. According to THR, “the latest remake will center on the father of a soon-to-be bride coming to terms with daughters’ nuptials. But the latest take will be told through the relationships in a big, sprawling Cuban-American family.”

The 1991 cast of the film reunited in September for a Netflix special. 

father of the bride
BUENA VISTA PICTURES

The feature filmed memorable moments from the Nancy Meyers film and its 1995 sequel Father of the Bride II and showed “the Banks family’s” home in 2020. The reunion was produced to honor the World Central Kitchen amid the pandemic.

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This Mexican Filmmaker’s Six-Pack Inspired The Oscar Statue

Entertainment

This Mexican Filmmaker’s Six-Pack Inspired The Oscar Statue

That’s right, Oscar’s real name is actually Emilio.

When it comes to the Academy Awards, there’s nothing more iconic than the actual Oscar award. That’s right, it’s not Björk’s swan dress or Jennifer Lopez’s beloved pink gown, when people think of the Oscar Awards it’s always the rip-chested statue with broad shoulders and muscled legs. The art deco god that everyone in entertainment dreams of one-day holding: the Oscar award.

But, as familiar as he may be, it turns out we don’t know Oscar very well.

Emilio Fernandez, born in Coahuila, Mexico, became the face of the Academy Awards thanks to a close friend.

Fernandez grew up during the Mexican Revolution and according to PRI, later left high school to become an officer for the Huertista rebels. In 1925, he was captured and sentenced to 20 years in prison but managed to escape his sentence and fled to Los Angeles.

Soon enough he began working as an extra in Hollywood and picked up the nickname “El Indio” when he met Dolores Del Rio, the silent film actress and wife of MGM Art Director Cedric Gibbons. the nickname was terrible but Del Rio and Fernandez became friends and when her husband was given an opportunity to design the award statuette fate happened.

Del Rio suggested Fernandez as a model for the statue and her husband agreed.

Fernandez’s life became much greater than a statue though, he became one of the biggest stars of the Golden Age of Mexican cinema. He worked in numerous film productions in Mexico and in Hollywood starring in the 1944 film María Candelaria, the 1947 film Río Escondido and Vìctimas del Pecado made in 1951.

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