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A Trans Latina Is Having Her Quinceanera Aired By HBO As A Docu-Series Exploring The Time Honored Tradition

HBO followed five Latinas during four quinces and this is what they got.

HBO and Mexican actress-singer Thalía teamed up to create “15: A Quinceañera Story,” a docu-series that shows the significance of the celebration across different Latino cultures. The four-part documentary, which airs on HBO on Dec. 19-22, will profile four quinceañeras with four very different stories. Here are the five young Latinas featured in the four-part documentary special.

1. Zoey

Zoey first caught the media’s attention last year with the release of a documentary about her life titled “Raising Zoey.” The film followed her story of acceptance as a transgender Latina living in south Los Angeles. In “15: A Quinceañera Story,” Zoey’s trans godmothers, who never got to have their own quinces, are able to partake in her special day. As the documentary shows, the trans women and Zoey having her own quince marks a change in the cultural acceptance of trans people in American and Latino society.

2. Rosi

Rosi, a Guatemalan-Cuban-American, is all about embracing all aspects of her identity. Rosi has to deal with political and international immigration laws in order to have her family attend her quince. The 15-year-old eventually has to move her quince abroad to Havana, Cuba because her grandfather’s visa to travel to the U.S. for the celebration gets denied.

3. Ashley

Ashley’s story is all about immigration and the current debate gripping the nation: her father has already been deported and her mother is a DACA recipient. Ashley, who lives in East Los Angeles, is also an amateur boxer whose first fight is scheduled very close to her quinceañera. To make things even more complicated, Ashley’s boxing coach is dealing with his own deportation proceedings.

4. Jackie and Nina

Jackie and Nina are best friends living in San Antonio. The two are avid escaramuza (rodeo) riders and are Mexican-Americans who are multiple generations deep in the United States. Jackie and Nina, who have been best friends all through childhood, want to enter womanhood together. Their love for each other and traditional Mexican horse riding leads the pair to have a joint quince centered on an escaramuza.


READ: This Quinceañera Theme Was So Legit, Even The Centerpieces Followed The Theme

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Even Though The Cast Of 'Home Alone' Didn't Include Any Latinos, These Are The 9 Ways I Could Totally Relate To The Movie

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Even Though The Cast Of ‘Home Alone’ Didn’t Include Any Latinos, These Are The 9 Ways I Could Totally Relate To The Movie

One of my favorite Christmas movies growing up was “Home Alone” — you know, the film about a wealthy white family that plans a holiday trip to Paris but accidentally leaves their son at home. Although my family isn’t white nor wealthy enough to afford holiday trips to Europe, there are moments throughout “Home Alone” that totally reminded me of my Latino family…

This opening scene where the entire family is scrambling trying to get ready for their vacation trip is totally my family.

CREDIT: HOME ALONE / HUGHES ENTERTAINMENT

It doesn’t matter how much time we have to prepare for a family trip, we always end up rushing last minute. And it’s a hot mess. This happens before trips, before a family party, before misa and every day before going to school.

Before jumping into their big van (also relatable) the McCallisters do a head count, which is pretty funny, but required when traveling with my huge family.

CREDIT: HOME ALONE / HUGHES ENTERTAINMENT

When people see my family they think we’re on a school field trip because of how many of us there are.

The scene where Kevin tricks the burglars into thinking his family is home, is the EXACT same security technique my family follows every time we’re away.

CREDIT: HOME ALONE / HUGHES ENTERTAINMENT

We didn’t have the money to buy security systems. Our security technique involved leaving the lights and television on, that way it seemed like there are people home.

When Kevin’s mom wasn’t around, he found the perfect recipe to cook: mac-n-cheese for dinner. That is spot-on what my meals looked like when I was in college and didn’t have my mom around.

CREDIT: HOME ALONE / HUGHES ENTERTAINMENT

I lived on Cup-o-noodles, mac-n-cheese and quesadillas because mom wasn’t around.

The most infuriating part about having siblings is when they eat all your food. I’ve definitely felt the same as Kevin when his brother eats  his favorite cheese pizza — in front of him!

CREDIT: HOME ALONE / HUGHES ENTERTAINMENT

I would’ve punched him on the spot. You don’t mess with my food.

But the difference is, I tend to react a little more like this:

Don’t. Mess. With. My food!!

Because of the love-hate relationship I have with my siblings, the booby traps Kevin sets on the burglars are inspiration for pranks I pulled on my brothers.

CREDIT: HOME ALONE / HUGHES ENTERTAINMENT

Muahaha. ?

And the way Kevin defends himself from the burglars reminds me of some advice my parents have always given me as a kid, which is: “No te dejes.”

CREDIT: HOME ALONE / HUGHES ENTERTAINMENT

If there was ever a kid at my school that was bothering me, my parents always told me to defend myself and never let anyone push me around.

Kevin’s mom also has some great guilt-tripping skills like my mom.

CREDIT: HOME ALONE / HUGHES ENTERTAINMENT

This sounds a lot like my mom when she says: “Que van hacer el día que yo me muera…”

But the final scene of “Home Alone” hits home for me the most.

CREDIT: HOME ALONE / HUGHES ENTERTAINMENT

Because I know the holidays wouldn’t be complete without my big Latino family.


READ: These Abuela Moments From ‘Jane The Virgin’ Are Hitting Home For Many People


How does “Home Alone” remind you of your family?

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