identities

Latinos Are Not Shy About Being Out, Loud And Proud Because It’s Always Pride In Our Hearts

Being part of the LGBTQ community is hard in itself. There are societal pressures and a recent spike in hate crimes committed against the LGBTQ community. Being queer and a Latino brings another set of issues that so many people never have to deal with. There is deep-seeded anti-LGBTQ sentiment within the Latino community connected to machismo that still needs to be dealt with.

However, one thing queer people know is that you have to be out, loud and proud when it is safe to do so. It changes people’s perception of the community when they know someone who is LGBTQ. It becomes personal and helps the community strive. Here are some Latinos who are proud to be part of the LGBTQ community and they are not hiding it.

Queen Sara Ramirez offered support lines for what can be a very difficult, or very cathartic day for folks.

CREDIT: @SaraRamirez / Twitter

Coming out is the most intense and nerve-wracking day for anyone trying to live their authentic self. What if my parents don’t accept me? What if my friends stop talking to me? It is a scary time and people some times need help outside of their immediate friends group.

LGBTQ people are sharing their PDA everywhere they can on the internet.

CREDIT: @realrainbowlove / Twitter

I’m here for this. It’s unreal that gay PDA was stigmatized on television and movies as recently as five years ago. Remember when that petition went around to get Cam and Mitch to kiss on screen on “Modern Family”? We’ve made strides but there is still so far to go.

“One Day at a Time” writers gave LGBTQ Latinos a chance to see themselves represented on television in a non-stereotypical fashion.

CREDIT: @ODAATwriters / Twitter

It is one of the few times we have seen a Latino family coming together to support an LGBTQ person on their family on television. It is a sweet reminder that Latino families just love their families.

Fun fact: Puerto Rico ranks higher than the U.S. on Spartacus’ Safety Travel Index.

CREDIT: @everwilde / Instagram

They have more laws on the books to protect trans people than the U.S. This is easy to do because the United States has *zero* laws that protect trans people from discrimination.

Seeing queer Latinos all over the internet as a normal couple goes a long way.

CREDIT: @harahsernandez / Instagram

Representation is so important for people living in a marginalized community. Queer Latinos have long been over dramatized in the media and it gives an unreal expectation of what it means to have a queer famiy member.

There are times when humor is the best way to go about coming out.

CREDIT: @69gummybears / Twitter

“Oh, hi mami, I’m just bingeing this really great show, “The L Word” because I don’t like men. Want to watch it with me? Want to hear my favorite characters?”

If you’ve got it, flaunt it.

CREDIT: @mommaamiaaa / Twitter

The pride wear is real. Most of us go all out for pride… and also #NationalComingOutDay. Peep Latina owned TomboyX for queer-friendly, everybody-friendly underwear. Yes, some of the waistbands are rainbow. 🌈

What we know on the other side:

CREDIT: @papergabe / Twitter

Once I accepted who I was and was out to the world, I assumed my family would disown me once I told them. A whole year later, I told them and it was a mixed bag. Whatever your fears are, they’re much bigger than the reality. Come out in your own time. You’ll know when you’re ready.

Yep, anyone who was paying attention could have called it.

CREDIT: @DiscreetLatino / Twitter

As Latinos, we thrive in the art of denial and we learn it from the best. So what if I played rugby all through high school and talked about my “girl crushes.”

They will ignore you until you start shining rainbows out your ears. Don’t expect them to willingly take the hint.

Bad Bunny is almost definitely the present day crush for all genders.

CREDIT: @tpxrk / Twitter

Yes to these glasses, yes to this attitude. You don’t have to come out as anything other than queer. I mean, we all know by now that gender is a construct with infinite expressions across the spectrum so why name just one, or two, or three if you’re attracted to more?

Everyone has a ‘song’ or artist crush.

CREDIT: @anthonysthots / Twitter

I was in love with Avril Lavigne growing up, hbu? My Christian elementary school told me she was a sinner and then I fell harder.

Some Latinos repped for Jesus.

CREDIT: @thelatinohandmodel / Twitter

I mean, personally, I’m forever scarred by the Catholic Church and my homophobic father, but I  👏🏽 am 👏🏽 here 👏🏽 for 👏🏽 you. We need more people willing to open LGBT youth with loving arms in every corner of the world.

Other people repped themselves. ✌🏽

CREDIT: @lavodnas_j / Twitter

Also, very cool, mijx. There is nothing better than living your truth regardless of people’s perceptions.

We can’t forget to shine some light on our bi friends and family.

CREDIT: @uncool_vicki / Twitter

Bisexuals make up the vast majority of the LGBT community and yet have some of the worst stigmas. The more folks own it with pride, the stronger the community. Vale.

There’s nothing like celebrating your coming out anniversary.

CREDIT: @_leilanipinedo / Twitter

Every year there is a whole new set of feelings around it, verdad? You look back at how your life looked and how you felt a year ago and see the evolution. It’s something worth celebrating.

The glo up is self-evident and ever glowing!

CREDIT: @mirandajadee7 / Twitter

Ever looked back on photos of yourself when you were still trying to perform to fit in? Only do this around Halloween because there is no other appropriate time for it.

Some of us called out white-washing when we see it.

CREDIT: @anthonysthots / Twitter

The organization actually does an incredible job of representing the diverse LGBT community. Check their feed and check their apoyo of Emma Gonzalez.

Organizations that offer mentorships can be so important for people who can’t come out to their families.

CREDIT: @jaileaan / Twitter

We all remember whatever periods of time we acted straight or used “they” pronouns to describe our significant other. Going home to the family in those days sucked. There’s a light at the end of the tunnel, friend.

TBH, not everyone has a hard coming out story.

CREDIT: @shlomo4u / Twitter

I’m not saying that this guy didn’t struggle. I hope he didn’t. I hope that one day, nobody feels strange and alone in a hetero world. Times are changing.

READ: Here Are 11 LGBTQ Latinos Who Will Make You Proud To Say You Are Part Of The Same Community

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I Started Yearly Trips To Mexico With My White Husband So We Could Better Understand Each Other

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I Started Yearly Trips To Mexico With My White Husband So We Could Better Understand Each Other

Courtesy of Araceli Cruz

Do you know how long it takes to drive from Southern California to Nayarit, Mexico? Approximately a day and a half. I know this because when I was a kid my family took that trip every year. I have such strong memories of those vacations; leaving our house around 4 a.m.; my mother packing up the car with an immense about of food; Los Bukis’ classics blasting on the radio; getting car sick and devouring Sal de Uvas. Most of all, it was just being together with my family, with no other choice but to remain a unit for the entire car ride until we arrived in my parent’s hometown of Jalcocotan. Now, we’re all grown adults, and those family trips are a thing of yesteryear. That’s why I have started taking my husband to Mexico every year to celebrate my culture, family and home country.

For the past couple of years, I’ve been slowly finding my way back to those memorable ventures by creating a whole new tradition — with my white husband.

Mexico has changed since I was a child. For as long as I could remember, the region where my family is from — Jalcocotan and Tepic — rarely experienced any kind of violence. Around 2009, however, a surge of shootings and murders occurred in the area and the increase in violence kept me away from my home country. Now that things seem to have gone back to normal, I’ve begun to go back and reignite the tradition once again.

I suppose, at the core of it, I miss that closeness I used to have with my family while we visited Mexico.

My siblings and I rarely fought, and neither did my parents. We just seemed to always get along and have so much fun while we vacationed. It’s like our day-to-day problems didn’t matter and simply faded away. So bringing my husband, Aaron, to Mexico, helps me get back to that place of nostalgia and a culture that I adore.

This time around I’m revisiting places I haven’t been to since I was a kid and seeing them in a whole new light, through my husband’s lens.

CREDIT: Courtesy of Araceli Cruz

I’m also discovering new beaches and towns that I never even know existed. It’s quite thrilling to experience memories as an adult and even more bizarre to share them with someone who is completely new to all of it.

The trips back are becoming a yearly occurrence again and this Christmas will be our third consecutive trip. For me, visiting my home country at the holidays is always so special.

Aaron knows a lot about my Mexican traditions like celebrating Day of the Dead and doing a bunch of crazy rituals on New Year’s Eve. He’s the tallest person at our family gatherings, so he was once asked to hold the piñata for all my nieces and nephews to hit. But that was in L.A. Celebrating Christmas in Mexico is going to be way different than anything we could do in the U.S.

There’s nothing quite like Noche Buena — Christmas Eve.

CREDIT: Instagram/@aliciadrc

I’m really looking forward to sharing our Mexican Christmas traditions with him such as drinking champurrado (perhaps spiked with tequila!), singing posadas, breaking piñatas, eating tamales and buñuelos, dancing all night and of course honoring el Niño Jesús.

Although I’m very proud my Mexican culture, I’ve also learned to incorporate Aaron’s traditions into my life as well.

He’s of German descent, born in eastern Iowa and raised in St. Louis. Suffice to say, our cultures aren’t the same. Aaron and I, have lived in North Carolina, and now we’re in Savannah, Georgia. So we’ve added some delightful Southern culinary traditions into our celebrations. For example, this past Thanksgiving we smoked our turkey. Sounds insane, right? But I’m here to tell you that Oprah did it too, so I don’t feel so weird now. Aaron’s family also has a Thanksgiving tradition of reading from William Bradford’s diary before they start the meal. This year we read Abraham Lincoln’s “Thanksgiving Proclamation” in which he declared Thanksgiving a national holiday. Not what I’m used to, but this cultural sharing has to go both ways or it doesn’t work.

To get us ready for our trip, I’ve created a really incredible playlist full of retro ’80s songs.

You’re invited to listen to it too! Enjoy!


READ: Latinos Are Some Of The Most Festive People And These Traditions Prove It

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