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New Years Eve Superstitions And Traditions That We All Swear By Because They Work

@bruccellati / Twitter

We all know that the magic of Jan. 1 is the promise of a fresh slate with mint new opportunities for love, dinero y good luck. Most people get drunk and kiss someone while they watch a giant ball drop in New York.

Latinos have a whole different method to ensure good luck, safe travels and hot sex in the new year and nobody else will understand.

If you’re Camila Cabello, you tweet this every year.

CREDIT: @CCabelloFR / Twitter

In 2016, she admitted the superstitions got to her and now she feels morally obligated to tweet that every year. I get it. Traditions make the magic happen. We bet she does literally all of this, too.

We get drunk off coquito and stuff our bodies with leftover tamales/pasteles.

CREDIT: @Latinegro / Twitter

You make enough tamales or pasteles at Buena Noche to last you until NYE because if your body doesn’t enter the New Year with food so entrenched in tradition, you get the same creepy feeling Camila gets when she considers not tweeting about her last shower. You just do it. You eat and get drunk.

Because we reuse everything, you also make sure everybody gets a chupito de coquito.

CREDIT: @JayomegaSO / Twitter

I don’t know what all this is, but we’re here for the Bacardi and we’re not going to drink it straight. Do as our ancestors taught us and prosper.

You eat 12 grapes at midnight.

CREDIT: @AmandaSalas / Twitter

One for every month of the year. Most of us make a wish for every month if we’re coherent enough to form thoughts.

Before the festivities, you scrub that house clean.

CREDIT: @ChaosAndConrad / Twitter

Because we’re all about the metaphors and superstitions. Clean the juju out of su casa unless you want to carry it all with you into the new year.

And then toss the dirty water out the window.

CREDIT: @chang40 / Twitter

*NOT* down the drain. The superstition is if you throw the bucket of dirty water out the window, that’s what officially washes you of bad juju.

Oh and before midnight, you do one last sweep.

CREDIT: @BraTheo_7 / Twitter

We’re nothing if not thorough. Plus, it’s a way to make sure the kids know that they’re always on the clock.

Lentejas bring you good luck so eat the most.

CREDIT: @bruccellati / Twitter

You also warn your date that the farts will be with them tonight, but it’ll all be worth it because you’re about to be their good luck charm in 2019. Come, come, come.

You run around the barrio with your luggage.

CREDIT: @damarizz14 / Twitter

Well, that’s what we all know we’re supposed to do, but we’re all too lazy and proud to actually go outside and do it. So you run around the house with your luggage so that your year is blessed with travels. It works!

Wear white for prosperity. Never wear black.

CREDIT: @beauty_newnew / Twitter

Maybe it’s the Santería in us, maybe it’s the Brazileño, but wherever this superstition comes from, we abide by its laws. The luck of the new year is all in the color of su ropa.

Want your year de amor? Wear red underwear.

CREDIT: @UndiesMX / Twitter

For some reason, our parents will be the first to tell you that if you wear red underwear, you’ll attract your soulmate in the next year. “It’s the law of attraction,” they say.

Want that money? Wear fresh yellow panties.

CREDIT: @Dingo_Bln / Twitter

I know. I hate the word ‘panties,’ too, but this is the script in the Great Book of Superstitions. They all say to wear yellow panties if you want good fortune next year. Don’t shoot the messenger.

Another way to earn that dough is by holding silver coins in your hand at midnight.

CREDIT: The Late Show / CBS

I mean, this one makes sense–if you follow the Law of Attraction. Make it rain, 2019.

Screw your left foot. You’re standing on your right at midnight to start the year off right.

CREDIT: The Little Mermaid / Disney

Just like we all know to walk onto an airplane with your right foot for life-saving luck, we all know to flamingo it up at midnight. Raise your hand if you made a fool of yourself the first NYE with blanquitos. 🙋🏽

Burn your enemies. Literally.

CREDIT: @Anna_Mazz / Twitter

Burn photos of the men that ghosted you, of the boss who unfollowed you on social media, of every resentment you hold dear in your heart from this terrible, terrible year. Don’t carry it with you–let the fire take it all.

Palo Santo your entire home and cuerpo.

CREDIT: @MendesCrewInfo / Twitter

Some of us use sage but most of us use Palo Santo. We flood the house with it’s purifying smoke to rid the house of ghosts, bad energy, etc. to make room for the good that’ll come with the new year.

Every single light must be on in the house at midnight.

CREDIT: @roshnip77 / Twitter

It’s the one time of year your mami isn’t running around, turning off lights, yelling, “Y que? Piensas que soy un banco?” It “brightens” the new year.

Quick! Do three squats.

CREDIT: GIPHY

Well, it’s more like, get off your ass and stand up. Now sit back down and do that three more times. Voila! You’re going to get married next year. De nada.

It’s 2018 so we’re creating new traditions.

CREDIT: @BadSalishGirl / Twitter

Honestly, mosre people need to get in on this one.

I’ll be saving my energy to smash white corporate supremacy in 2019, hbu?

CREDIT: @Shannon_Grayson / Twitter

What crazy traditions will you keep and which will you bury? Comment below!


READ: NYE Traditions That Seem Weird AF To Everyone Else But Latinos

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14 Latino Brands Latinos Cannot Live Without

identities

14 Latino Brands Latinos Cannot Live Without

BakingBusiness.com

Whether it’s abuelita’s favorite or a new found love, there are a handful of Latino brands some of us can’t live without. From makeup to household supplies, these are 14 of our favorite Latino must-have brands.

1. San Marcos

Credit: Which San Marcos Blanket is For You? (Mitú)

Our list wouldn’t be complete without our beloved San Marcos cobijas. Original San Marcos blankets were produced from 1976 to 2004 by owners Jesus and Francisco Rivera in their hometown of San Marcos, Aguascalientes, Mexico. Although the company is not technically still up and running, the brand still lives on in just about every Mexican household.

2. Cuaba Soap

Credit: Loyal Nana

If you’re Dominican, then you know that Cuaba soap is definitely a household staple. Jabon de cuaba is made out of pine resin. It’s not only used for showering but it can also be used to wash dirty laundry.

3. Suavitel

Credit: Target 

Although Suavitel is technically an American brand, just about every Latino can identify this scent. This fabric softener is definitely abuela-approved. Plus, it’s perfect for those San Marcos cobijas!

4. Beautyblender

Credit: Instagram @reaannsilva

The Latina-owned brand Beautyblenders is a staple for most Latino and Latina makeup gurus. Owner Rea Ann Silver created the infamous beauty sponge back in 2003 and the rest is history!

6. Clandestina

Credit: Clandestina

Established in 2015, Clandestina became the first Cuban urban fashion brand. They are located in Havana and sell their clothing and accessories globally. In addition to being super trendy, this must-have clothing line prides itself on being pro-zero-waste.

7. Gruma

Credit: BakingBusiness.com

Gruma, aka the mother of all things corn and flour, obviously made our list of favorite brands. Most tamales, quesadillas and tacos, indirectly come from the 79 productions plants Gruma has worldwide.

8. Bimbo

 Credit: Food Business News

As Latinos, Bimbo is part of our childhood, begging our parents to buy us Panques, Mantecadas, Doraditas. The Bimbo brand started over 70 years ago in Mexico City and was made famous for their white bread, toast, and Panques. Now Bimbo is in over 24 countries across the globes.

9. Barcel

Credit: Barcel

Takis, Hot Nuts, Dulces Vero, Ricolino… the list goes on and on. We all know that Barcel is the real MVP of Latino brands as far as snacks are concerned.

10. Ibarra 

Credit: Mexican Hot Chocolate Recipe (Pinterest)

With the holiday season in full swing, you know we can’t forget about our favorite hot chocolate brand. There’s a never-ending battle between Abuelita and Ibarra hot chocolate, but we all know who the real winner is here.

11. Gamesa

Credit: MexGrocer

Latinos everywhere grew up on Gamesa galletas. Gamesa is Mexico’s largest cookie manufacturer, giving us all of our childhood favorites like Marias, Barras de CoCo, and Arcoiris just to name a few.

12. La Universal

Credit: La Universal 

Speaking of sweet, childhood treats, let’s not forget about La Universal – maker of the Manicho chocolate bars. ¡Delicioso! La Universal is an Ecuadorian company that was founded all the back in 1889 and is recognized throughout Ecuador and Latin America for its 129 years of delicious treats.

13. Jarritos

Credit: Cultureatz

Are you thirsty after all this talk about our favorite Latino food brands? Don’t worry because we didn’t forget our favorite meal companion, Jarritos. Jarritos was founded in 1950 in Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico. These popular Mexican sodas have gained worldwide popularity and do not disappoint.

14. Inca Kola

Credit: Wikipedia

On the topic of delicious sodas, we can’t forget of course this Peruvian favorite, Inca Kola. Inca Kola aka the Golden Kola was created back in 1935 in Peru but are now bottled in the United States. Like their slogan states, it truly is ¡refrescante para todo el mundo!

Whether your favorite Latino brand makes paleta or jewelry, one thing is for certain: Latinos have the best brands hands down. For those who beg to differ, don’t forget we love chanclas too.


READ: These 20 Delicious Latino Snacks You Need To Be In Your Life Permanently

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