identities

Latino Muslims Are Talking About Their Experience At The Intersection Of Latino And Muslim

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Latinos are one of the fastest growing segments within the Muslim community. As the U.S. Latino population is on the rise as the nation’s largest minority so is the number of Latino Muslims. Yet many don’t acknowledge or are aware of this growing demographic in U.S and the conversation surrounding how these two identities intersect tends to be overlooked. That’s why last year PEN America took to Twitter to begin dialogue with users to discuss their identities and began this long overdue conversation. As Ramadan begins, we want to revisit this conversation and ask everyone to get involved.

Twitter users created #LatinxRamadan to spread awareness of the common struggles of Latinx Muslims.

For many in the intersectional community, the hashtag created a place to talk and experience the deep layers of being Latinx and Muslim. What better time to do that than during Ramadan.

Some people shared about the difficulty of being Latinx in the Muslim community.

People who live at intersections of different identities can have a hard time fitting in with either community. By having this intersectional conversation, the community is able to break down the walls and grow into their own space.

One of the many traditions of Ramadan consists of fasting from dawn till dusk and following with a community meal known as Iftar, used to break their fast together.

People shared some of the various meals that they break fast with showing the intersectionality between Latino and Muslim culture. Last year activists Rida Hamida and Benjamin Vazquez came up with the idea of bringing taco trucks to mosques all over Orange County, California in an attempt to help bridge the divide between the Latino and Muslim communities. The event was called #TacoTrucksAtEveryMosque which included a food truck that served halal food.

 Fasting during Ramadan means no eating and no drinking, not even water.

Not only is is tough to be Latinx in the Muslim community, according to some tweets, it can be just as challenging to be Muslim in the Latino community.

Pen America asked people how they integrate Latino culture into their Ramadan experience.

Whether it is through language, food, or family tradition, these people have fully developed their own way of celebrating the sacred holiday.

This year, Ramadan is from Tuesday, May 15 to Thursday, June 14.

For 30 days, Muslims will fast every day from sunrise to sunset in observance of the holiest month in the Islamic calendar.

Happy Ramadan, everyone.

How do you celebrate Ramadan?


READ: Latinos And Muslims Are Having Cross-Cultural Exchanges During Ramadan Thanks To Halal Tacos

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20 Latino Brands That Are Clearly Superior To All Others

identities

20 Latino Brands That Are Clearly Superior To All Others

Untitled. Digital Image. Juanitas. 15 May 2018.

There are certain brands that you just can’t imagine your life or childhood without. We did some digging on the company’s history and you’ll be surprised to learn which brands are Latino through and through, and which have just been adopted by our culture as our own.

Read on and decide for yourself which products will be a part of your own kids’ childhoods.

1. Goya

Latino brands
CREDIT: “Goya Adobo Seasoning.” Digital Image. Goya. 15 May 2018.

You knew we’d start here. Goya is the largest Latino-owned food company in the United States. Founded by Spanish immigrants, Goya began as a staple in NYC Latino homes in the 1930’s. Now it belongs everywhere.

2. Chupa Chups

CREDIT: Untitled. Digital Image. ChupaChupsUniverse. 15 May 2018.

The story goes that Catalonian Enric Bernat knew the world needed a “sweet with a fork” and Chupa Chups were born and are extremely popular in Mexico. So yes, we invented lollipops. Naturally.

3. HERDEZ®

CREDIT: “Tradition you can taste.” Digital Image. HERDEZ. 15 May 2018.

You can’t live without their Salsa Casera in your pantry and on all your tacos, and that’s because it’s Mexico’s No. 1 salsa brand. Any other brand is just fronting.

4. Pelon Pelo Rico

CREDIT: “Pelon Pelo Rico Tamarind Candy: 36-Piece Display” Digital Image. Candy Warehouse. 15 May 2018.

Let’s talk candy. Originally from Guadalajara, the brand now exists under the Hershey Company’s Lorena brand, and is like taking a hit of sugar.

5. Marinela’s Gansito

CREDIT: Untitled. Digital Image. MarinelaUSA. 15 May 2018.

Founded in Mexico in 1954, the strawberry filled Gansito snack cake was one of the first introduced, and is still the favorite around the US and Latin America. We cannot forget Pingüinos, Choco Roles or Submarinos, though.

6. Fabuloso

CREDIT: “Fabuloso.” Digital Image. Walmart. 15 May 2018.

We grew up with the smell of Fabuloso on Saturday mornings, and while it actually isn’t the best cleaner, we’re here for the *smell* of a clean house. Also, it’s impossible to find out who began this brand, but it is now owned by Colgate-Palmolive.

7. Mistolín

CREDIT: @AngelRTalk / Twitter

Owned by Dicarina Panamá, this brand is Latino through and through, and there really is no Fabuloso vs Mistolín debate. Your mom uses them both, but probably is all about the pine scent.

8. Modelo

CREDIT: @modelousa / Instagram

Grupo Modelo started out in 1925 in Tacuba, Mexico. Today it exports all across the world and also gave us Coronas, Estrellas and Pacífico cervezas. 🙏 🙏 🙏

9. Patrón

CREDIT: “Patron Silver Tequila, 375 mL” Digital Image. Walmart. 16 May 2018.

Guys, Patrón has been around long before Pitbull. It was founded in 1492 in Mexico and is a staple in every household.

10. Café Bustelo

CREDIT: “Cafe Bustelo.” Digital Image. Walmart. 15 May 2018.

After a night of Patrón, you wake up to Cuban coffee, and it looks like this. Gregorio Menendez Bustelo moved from Cuba to the U.S. in 1917 where he founded the company.

11. Vero Mango

CREDIT: @vero.mango / Instagram

It’s like a mango covered in Tajín, except it’s actually tamarindo flavored candy covered in Tajín. This is Mexican through and through. #health

12. Tajín

CREDIT: Untitled. Digital Image. Tajín. 16 May 2018.

Speaking of, Empresas Tajín company is based out of Zapopan, Jalisco, Mexico and they have replaced table pepper. The spice is una mezcla of chile peppers, lime and salt, basically and it goes on fruit, beer, and like, all your meals.

13. de la Rosa mazapán

CREDIT: Untitled. Digital Image. Amazon. 15 May 2018.

This Mexican brand has been giving us mazapán, japones and pandinos for 70 years now. Mazapán isn’t just for weddings in my house.

14. Juanita’s Foods

CREDIT: Untitled. Digital Image. Juanitas. 15 May 2018.

In 1946, George De La Torre and Albert Guerrero established the Harbor Canning Company in California. Just a few years later, they realize that Albert’s wife, Ruth, makes a mean menudo and decide to ship it to supermarkets. Today they are the largest producer of Menudo and their motto is “To enjoy Mexican food is to enjoy life.” Brava.

15. La Victoria

CREDIT: “La Victoria Enchilada Sauce, Mild, 10-Ounce Cans (Pack of 12)” Digital Image. Amazon. 16 May 2018.

You lived off this in college. La Victoria is owned by Mexican familia La Bacas, who founded the company in 1917 and aim to keep bringing traditional Mexican flavors to cans and grocery stores nationwide.

16. Beautyblender

CREDIT: Untitled. Digital Image. Allure. 16 May 2018.

Bet you didn’t know that America’s favorite makeup applicator was founded by celebrity makeup artist Rea Ann Silva. So don’t go for the knock offs and support the badassery of this Mexican, Irish and Portuguese boss.

17. Tres Flores

CREDIT: “Three Flowers Brilliantine Pomade Solid 3.25oz Image 1 of 4.” Digital Image. Walmart. 15 May 2018.

Your mom has 100 percent smeared this jasmine and chrysanthemum pomade in your hair before ballet recitals, or you’ve seen your dad use this for the perfect mustache. You’ll be shooketh to learn that this is actually a French brand, and has only been owned by Latino culture.

18. Teta Harper

CREDIT: @tataharperskincare / Instagram

Speaking of Latinas owning the beauty game, Teta Harper Skincare is owned by Colombian health advocate, Teta Harper. After her stepfather was diagnosed with skin cancer, she made it her mission to offer people a safer, entirely chemical-free line you can feel good using.

19. Hija de tu Madre

CREDIT: @hijadetumadre / Instagram

How can you not support a company that has a bedazzled, sequined Lady of Guadalupe on denim jackets? Owner Patty Delgado uses her brand to create a fashion identity that is uniquely Latinx: “We are ni de aqui, ni de alla.”

P.S.- You’ll find Frida Kahlo denim jackets here, too.

20. Vaporú

CREDIT: Untitled. Digital Image. Vicks. 16 May 2018.

OK, this one isn’t Latino owned, but it’s definitely Latino appropriated. That’s just because we truly see the magical healing properties unlike all these other muggles.

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