Latino Muslims Are Talking About Their Experience At The Intersection Of Latino And Muslim

credit: mitú

Latinos are one of the fastest growing segments within the Muslim community. As the U.S. Latino population is on the rise as the nation’s largest minority so is the number of Latino Muslims. Yet many don’t acknowledge or are aware of this growing demographic in U.S and the conversation surrounding how these two identities intersect tends to be overlooked. That’s why last year PEN America took to Twitter to begin dialogue with users to discuss their identities and began this long overdue conversation. As Ramadan begins, we want to revisit this conversation and ask everyone to get involved.

Twitter users created #LatinxRamadan to spread awareness of the common struggles of Latinx Muslims.

For many in the intersectional community, the hashtag created a place to talk and experience the deep layers of being Latinx and Muslim. What better time to do that than during Ramadan.

Some people shared about the difficulty of being Latinx in the Muslim community.

People who live at intersections of different identities can have a hard time fitting in with either community. By having this intersectional conversation, the community is able to break down the walls and grow into their own space.

One of the many traditions of Ramadan consists of fasting from dawn till dusk and following with a community meal known as Iftar, used to break their fast together.

People shared some of the various meals that they break fast with showing the intersectionality between Latino and Muslim culture. Last year activists Rida Hamida and Benjamin Vazquez came up with the idea of bringing taco trucks to mosques all over Orange County, California in an attempt to help bridge the divide between the Latino and Muslim communities. The event was called #TacoTrucksAtEveryMosque which included a food truck that served halal food.

 Fasting during Ramadan means no eating and no drinking, not even water.

Not only is is tough to be Latinx in the Muslim community, according to some tweets, it can be just as challenging to be Muslim in the Latino community.

Pen America asked people how they integrate Latino culture into their Ramadan experience.

Whether it is through language, food, or family tradition, these people have fully developed their own way of celebrating the sacred holiday.

This year, Ramadan is from Tuesday, May 15 to Thursday, June 14.

For 30 days, Muslims will fast every day from sunrise to sunset in observance of the holiest month in the Islamic calendar.

Happy Ramadan, everyone.

How do you celebrate Ramadan?


READ: Latinos And Muslims Are Having Cross-Cultural Exchanges During Ramadan Thanks To Halal Tacos

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