hide from home

After Four Years Fighting In The Marines, This Deported Veteran Came Back To The US In A Casket

Enrique Salas / Facebook

Enrique Salas used his personal social media account to share articles about deported veterans. The military veteran was an impassioned advocate for the rights of undocumented servicemen and women facing deportation. This is the reality for many service members, including Salas. Salas, who served four active years with the Marines did get back to the U.S. to his family, in a casket.

For years, Enrique Salas fought for the United States and the freedom Americans enjoy.

Happy tbt keep me in your prayers hope to b home soon.

Posted by Enrique Salas on Thursday, September 29, 2016

As an undocumented immigrant, one way to try to become a U.S. citizen is to join the military. Salas did that at the age of 17 by joining the Marines.

According to The Fresno Bee, Salas was on active duty with the Marines for four years and served in the Philippines, Thailand and Singapore.

“He was honorably discharged in 1992 after serving in the Persian Gulf War, his military record rife with commendations including National Defense Service Medal, Sea Service Ribbon, and Good Conduct Medal. He remained in the Marine Reserve until 1996,” The Fresno Bee reports.

However, Salas battled with drug addiction and, in 2004, he was convicted for possession of a controlled substance for sale. This conviction got him deported to Mexico in 2006.

Im ready to come home family and friends i really love all the support and positive vibes im getting thank you. Muchas gracias a todos por su apoyo positivo.

Posted by Enrique Salas on Thursday, June 30, 2016

Salas was deported back to Mexico in 2006 because he never applied for his citizenship before the 2004 conviction.

For the last 12 years he has lived in Tijuana, a place he had never known, but it’s the closest city to the U.S.

“My parents gave two of their children to the Marine Corps, and now they’ve lost both of us,” Salas said in a American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) report titled “Discharged, then Discarded: How U.S. veterans are banished by the country they swore to protect.”

Salas was injured in a serious car accident this year in Tijuana and required serious medical attention.

This brother, deported for no fucking reason, passed away today. RIP Enrique Salas

Posted by Marlena Fitzpatrick on Thursday, April 12, 2018

According to The Fresno Bee, Miriam Rodriguez, Salas’s sister, applied for an emergency humanitarian parole visa so her brother could get better medical care in San Diego. Salas suffered a heart attack during the 10 days it took for the visa to be approved.

Salas died in the ambulance on his way from Tijuana to San Diego from trauma caused in the accident.

On April 12, at the age of 47, Salas suffered a second heart attack while on the way to San Diego and was pronounced brain dead. The drive from Tijuana to San Diego takes about an hour and it was too long for Salas.

He was given a U.S. military burial in his hometown of Reedley, California and is now buried next to his brother, another fallen veteran.

“Unfortunately, we were not able to bring him back to the United States to seek the medical treatment that he’s entitled to in time to save his life,” Ricardo Franco, chairman of the Committee on Deported Veterans under the Veterans Caucus of the California Democratic Party, told The Fresno Bee.

Salas’s cousin, Fred Martinez, told The Marine Corps Times, “This is a bad way to get back to the states.”

According to the Committee on Deported Veterans, there’s an estimated 1,500 veterans that have been deported.


READ: This Military Veteran Served Two Tours In Afghanistan And Was Deported In The Middle Of The Night

Share this story with all of your friends by tapping that little share button below!

ICE Raids Ordered To Begin On Sunday In Major Cities

Things That Matter

ICE Raids Ordered To Begin On Sunday In Major Cities

Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) is reportedly planning a raid in the early morning hours on Sunday in 10 cities.

It is being reported that the raids will target more than 2,000 families in cities with large migrant populations including Chicago, Los Angeles, Miami, and Houston, according to officials who remain anonymous.

Trump tweeted on Monday that ICE would begin deporting millions of undocumented immigrants throughout the U.S.

More than “1 million” undocumented immigrants “have been issued final deportation orders by federal judges yet remain at large in the country” and called enforcing those judicial orders a “top priority” for ICE, a senior administration official told CNN.

They are allegedly planning to use hotel rooms to house everyone until the family can be deported together and say they might even arrest individuals that can’t be deported immediately. They will most likely be released with ankle monitors, in cases such as parents whose children are U.S. citizens.

Miami is reportedly one of the first cities that’ll be raided, according to the Miami Herald, and the other cities are Atlanta, Baltimore, Denver, New Orleans, New York City, and San Francisco.

Those who will allegedly be targeted include minors who came into the U.S. without their parents and have since turned 18; people who were ordered removed in absentia; and people who missed a court hearing and failed to respond to letters from the Department of Justice (DOJ). Additionally, families on the “rocket docket,” a set of deportation cases fast-tracked for by the DOJ.

There are around 52,000 single adults in ICE custody overall, mostly those who came from the border, according to CNN.

Many are saying Trump’s push for deportations, including essentially outing the raid, are part of his reelection bid due to his poor record.

The inhumane treatment of immigrants in detention centers has been well documented, with a spread of illness leading to many unnecessary deaths, including those of children.

Recently the American Civil Liberties Union  ACLU shared on Instagram what people can do if ICE comes knocking on their door.

View this post on Instagram

What to do if ICE agents are at your door. #KnowYourRights

A post shared by ACLU (@aclu_nationwide) on

They advise not to open the door unless they have a warrant signed by a judge since ICE administrative warrant does not give them permission to enter a home.

The ACLU website also has an entire section dedicated to immigrants’ rights with several resources for dealing with ICE, border patrol, and the police.

In response to raid that occurred in Ohio a little more than a year ago, HOLA Ohio founder Veronica Isabel Dahlberg wrote in a blog on the ACLU site:

“Regardless of citizenship status, for workers — including teenagers, mothers, fathers, and those with medical issues — to be treated like enemy insurgents is beyond disturbing. It is terrible, barbaric, and inhumane.”

READ: Daughter Sues ICE After They Denied Father Cirrhosis And Diabetes Medication While In Detention Resulting In His Death

New Research Shows Most Undocumented Immigrants Aren’t Coming From Mexico But Instead Central America

Things That Matter

New Research Shows Most Undocumented Immigrants Aren’t Coming From Mexico But Instead Central America

@broloelcordero / Instagram

Mexicans no longer make up the overall majority of unauthorized immigrants living in the United States. According to a new study by the Pew Research Center, the number of Mexicans leaving the U.S. is more than there are coming here which is a significant change from the early 2000s. These new numbers show the changing landscape of immigration in the U.S. within the last decade where there are fewer immigrants arriving. This trend shows those who have been in the U.S. for longer are now by far the majority of immigrants as a whole.

The immigrant population in the U.S., which has its smallest unauthorized immigrant population in more than a decade, is shifting quickly.

Credit: Pew Research Center

Since 2010, migration from Mexico into the U.S. has been slowly decreasing as data shows more Mexicans have moved south across the border than the north. According to the Pew Research Center, between 2007 and 2017, about two million of the Mexican immigrants who left the U.S. had been living in the country undocumented, 6.9 to 4.9 respectively.

This shift has contributed to an overall decline in the undocumented immigrant population which has gone down from a peak of 12.2 million in 2007 to a low of 10.5 million in 2017.

There has also been an uptick in the length of time most undocumented immigrants have been in the county. The typical undocumented immigrant had lived 15 years in the United States in 2017, which is up from seven years in 1995. It’s the highest number of years since Pew started tracking that data.

While the number of immigrants from Mexico has gone down, Central Americans are coming at unprecedented rates.

Credit: Pew Research Center

There’s been a surge of migrants from Central American countries, like Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras that have arrived in the U.S. within the last few years. From 1.5 million in 2007 to 1.9 million in 2017, Central Americans represent one of the biggest increases in the overall immigrant population.

Though many Central Americans are crossing the border illegally, they’re requesting asylum, which means a much longer process and stay for many.
Even with the recent surge of families from Central America seeking asylum at the southern border, apprehensions remain far below the peak number of about 1.6 million in 2000.

Research has also found that long term residents outnumber more recent arrivals. Undocumented immigrants living in the U.S. have become more settled into their communities. In 2010, about 50 percent of the nation’s undocumented immigrants had lived in the country for more than 10 years. In 2017, that number rose to 66 percent.

Following Central America, the immigrant population of people from Asia has also risen to 1.4 million. The share of both legal and unauthorized immigrants from Asian nations has also continued to spike.

What do these numbers mean in terms of tracking and foreseeing future immigration trends moving forward?

Credit: Pew Research Center

The latest data is a reflection of the various global and domestic changes that have made noticeable differences in immigration trends. Several factors include the U.S government investing more heavily in border security which had made illegal border crossings harder. In 1994, the U.S. had fewer than 5,000 Border Patrol agents but today that number is nearly 20,000. Stopping the rising inflow of unauthorized immigrants has been one of the key issues for the Trump administration.

The Mexican economy has also improved, resulting in more Mexicans to stay in their country and more Mexicans living in the U.S. to return back. Many of the migration trends that were seen in the last 20 years have changed and Mexicans are one of those changing demographics.

Data shows that the second wave of illegal immigration isn’t coming from those in other countries but rather those already here overstaying visas.
More than 600,000 foreign travelers who legally entered the U.S in 2017 overstayed their visas and remained here by the end of the year, according to recent Department of Homeland Security data.

“The decline in unauthorized immigrants from Mexico and rise from other parts of the world is one sign of a change in how recent arrivals to this population enter the country,” the researchers wrote. “A growing share of U.S. unauthorized immigrants do not cross the border illegally, but probably arrive with legal visas and overstay their required departure date.”

READ: Ahead Of Supreme Court Decision, Census Bureau Quietly Seeks Citizenship Data

Paid Promoted Stories