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The 24 Slayingest Latina Queens From ‘RuPaul’s Drag Race’

For 9 years, “RuPaul’s Drag Race” has been showcasing the very best in the drag queen world. There have been over 100 contestants that have fought for the crown and title for best drag queen. Here are 24 of the Latina drag queens that have graced our screens and the RuPaul runway.

1. Valentina

CREDIT: allaboutvalentina / Instagram

The Los Angeles-based queen caused a stir on her season when she was shockingly eliminated after being a strong competitor. She dropped the ball during her lip sync and didn’t learn the words. She even tried to leave her mask on and Mama Ru was not having it. At least she won Miss Congeniality Fan Favorite.

2. Bianca del Rio

CREDIT: therealbiancadelrio / Instagram

You’re a winner baby! Bianca del Rio made “Drag Race” herstory when she became the first Latina drag queen to take home the crown on season 5. Since the show, Del Rio has enjoyed a fair amount of success even touring the country with her own edgy and slightly uncomfortable comedy shows. Seriously, her shows might go a bit too far for many but they are great for people with vulgar senses of humor.

3. Adore Delano

CREDIT: adoredelano / Instagram

Adore Delano first hit the “Drag Race” scene in season 6 and lasted until the 14th episode. However, her return to All-Stars season 2 was a shocker after she quit the show two episodes in. To be fair, Delano had already built a music career by the time she returned and her look works for her. She didn’t appreciate the judges critiquing her look that made her who she is to her adoring fans.

4. Violet Chachki

CREDIT: violetchachki / Instagram

Yes. She is Latina, in case you weren’t aware. She is also the second Latina queen to take home the crown as “Drag Race” winner. She can cinch her waist better than any queen and who can forget about her fall runway surprise outfit reveal on season 7. Sick. En. Ing.

5. Cynthia Lee Fontaine

CREDIT: cynthialeefontaine / Instagram

Cynthia Lee Fontaine is a two-time contestant on “RuPaul’s Drag Race”. First, she was on season 8 and then came back as a surprise contestant on season 9. If you give her a moment, she will gladly tell you about her cucu while being unapologetic about her thick, Puerto Rican accent. She’s also just loud enough to get your attention in a crowded bar during PRIDE.

6. Carmen Carrera

CREDIT: carmen_carrera / Instagram

Carmen Carrera sissied that walk down the runway in season 3. Not only did she get eliminated from the show, she was let go twice. Brutal. Luckily, that never slowed her down and Carmen Carrera, who transitioned after the show, went on to become a very successful model. She has been using her fame as a model to bring attention to the plight of LGBTQ people, especially trans people, throughout Latin America and is engaged in the fight against HIV and AIDS.

7. Roxxxy Andrews

CREDIT: roxxxyandrews / Instagram

Roxxxy Andrews is another queen to have competed on her own season as well as on an All Star season. While the was eliminated in both, Andrews wore her heart on her sleeve and never backed down from her emotions. She even shared the heartbreaking story of how the thought of elimination brought back feelings of not being wanted by her mother. According to Andrews, her mother left her and her sister at a bus station when she was just a young child and never returned.

8. Ginger Minj

CREDIT: gingerminj / Instagram

Glamor Toad Realness personified, that’s who Ginger Minj is. The Orlando queen loves everything about her body and is not about to back down from her self-love anytime soon. Minj was a contestant on All Stars Season 2 after being the runner up on season 7. Just take one second and research this self proclaimed crossdresser for Christ and you will surely fall in love.

9. Jessica Wild

CREDIT: jessicawild88 / Instagram

Jessica Wild is another season 2 queen and she definitely left a mark on fans. Her elimination came after a maxi challenge sponsored by Absolut Berri Acai cocktail. The queens were supposed to do an interview where they plug their autobiography and the cocktail but Wild spent too much time on the cocktail. There is also consensus that the language barrier might have led to misunderstandings that factored into her elimination.

10. Monica Beverly Hillz

CREDIT: monicabhillz / Instagram

Monica Beverly Hillz is credited with being the first transgender woman to come out as trans while filming the show. Three other queens have transitioned but made the announcement of their transition after the show wrapped. Hillz is the queen that sent Serena ChaCha packing in episode 2 of season 5. She was sent home the following episode.

11. Lineysha Sparx

CREDIT: lineyshasparx / Instagram

Lineysha Sparx was born in New York City but lives in Puerto Rico after moving there with her mother and father when she was 6. She tried her best in season 5 but just couldn’t cut it and was eliminated by Detox. She started strong with a high finish in episode 1 and a win in episode 2.

12. Naysha Lopez

CREDIT: nayshalopez / Instagram

Naysha Lopez is another queen with the rare title of being sent home twice in one season. She was the first queen eliminated in her season but was brought back by RuPaul in episode 3. Even though was was brought back in episode 3, she was quickly eliminated in episode 4 bringing her time on “RuPaul’s Drag Race” to an end.

13. Madame LaQueer

CREDIT: madamelaqueer / Instagram

Madame LaQueer is the drag mother of Lineysha Sparx. Her name is an homage to a character of a telenovela that she loved when she was younger. The character, according to LaQueer, was the villain of the show and the head of a whore house. Well, that’s something.

14. Kandy Ho

CREDIT: ho_kandy / Instagram

Kandy Ho is a member of The Doll House, a Puerto Rican drag house, that is also home to April Carrión. Ho made it 6 episodes on season 7 competing alongside Ginger Minj and Violet Chachki. She spent most of her life living in Puerto Rico and made sure that everyone knew that she is from Puerto Rico during her entrance to the workroom.

15. Alisa Summers

CREDIT: alisasummersofficial / Instagram

Alisa Summers is the only Latina drag queen to come in last place on the show. She just wasn’t able to out lip sync Jiggly Caliente to stick around for another week of season 4. Her name is an homage to Lisa “Left Eye” Lopes but it was her drag mother who recommended that she add the “A” to Lisa to make it different.

16. Alexis Mateo

CREDIT: alexismateoofficial / Instagram

Alexis Mateo first entered the RuPaul universe in season 3. She did well, winning three challenges throughout the season before being eliminated winning 3rd place. She came back in All Stars Season 1 and battled against some of the top queens to come in 5th place. Mateo continues to perform around the world often sharing the stage with her RuPaul sisters.

17. Rebecca Glasscock

CREDIT: the_javier_rivera / Instagram

Rebecca Glasscock was part of the maiden season of “RuPaul’s Drag Race” often referred to as the “Lost Season” since you can’t find clips anywhere. Season 1 started to break down the mainstream idea of what it means to be a drag queen and helped pave the way for the seasons that followed. Her social media doesn’t show her to be as active in the drag community but she still performs because you can’t be an original RuPaul queen and not perform.

18. Kenya Michaels

CREDIT: realkenyamichaels / Instagram

Kenya Michaels was a contestant on season 4 of “RuPaul’s Drag Race” and was also eliminated twice. The first time was after a bad Beyoncé impression that fell flat and the second time she was eliminated the same episode she was brought back for. Michaels is a survivor of the Pulse Nightclub shooting that shook the LGBTQ Latinx community in Jun 2016. Michaels had just finished performing her last number in the Orlando nightclub when the shooter entered and opened fire on the crowd.

19. Yara Sofia

CREDIT: yarasofiapr / Instagram

Yara Sofia was originally born in Puerto Rico and currently lives in Las Vegas. The queen slayed on season 3 ending in 4th place, and also being voted as Miss Congeniality. She then came back fro All Stars 1 where she left in 5th place. The fierce queen continues to slay on stage and even hosts her own night at Piranha Club in Las Vegas. Get it.

20. Delta Work

CREDIT: deltawork / Instagram

Delta Work was a season 3 firecracker as she battled it out with the other queens. She made it to 7th place on her season and was sent home by Manila Luzon. Since her time on the show, Delta Work has made a big name for herself, even getting the attention of Adele while dressed as her at a concert. More importantly though, Delta Work is the new mastermind behind RuPaul’s hair for “RuPaul’s Drag Race” since season 9.

21. Jade Sotomayor

CREDIT: jadesotomayor / Instagram

Jade Sotomayor stays in the public eye with appearances and performances across the country. She is another queen to have appeared on the very first season of “RuPaul’s Drag Race” and lasted for four episodes earning her 4th place.

22. Nina Flowers

CREDIT: djninaflowers / Instagram

Nina Flowers was a season 1 contestant and an All Stars 1 participant. On season 1, Flowers made it to second place losing to the first ever “RuPaul’s Drag Race” queen Bebe Zahara Benet. Flowers proved that drag queens can be super edgy and artistic and she has since used her talents to become a successful DJ.

23. Serena ChaCha

CREDIT: myron.morgan / Instagram

Serena ChaCha was one of the most controversial queens to ever set foot on the catwalk. ChaCha made waves in season 5 before being sent home after the second episode. ChaCha stepped on several toes when she talked about how she was educated to the dismay of many viewers and some of her competitors. After “RuPaul’s Drag Race” ChaCha has become a wig designer with her own line of wigs sold for a pretty hefty price.

24. April Carrión

CREDIT: aprilcarrion / Instagram

April Carrión first started drag while in Puerto Rico and she knew that she found something she loved. It wasn’t long until she was performing and eventually landing a spot on “RuPaul’s Drag Race” season 6. She only made it to the 4th episode but she has used her fame to highlight the lives of trans people and drag queens living in Puerto Rico in her project called “MALA MALA”.

Aren’t they fabulous?

CREDIT: To Wong Foo: Thanks For Everything, Julie Newmar / Universal Pictures

Way to go, queens. Your visibility will make it possible for more young Latinos to show the world the beauty they have inside.

The Miss Universe Pageant Featured Its First Openly Lesbian Contestant And Crowned Miss South Africa The Winner

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The Miss Universe Pageant Featured Its First Openly Lesbian Contestant And Crowned Miss South Africa The Winner

NBC Universal / Miss Universe

Miss Universe made history this year. First crowning Miss South Africa, Zozibini Tunzi as its winner. Tunzi has dark skin and a short-cropped afro — rampant anti-blackness means most people would not have conceived of her as the most desirable woman in the universe just a few years ago. Tunzi’s win is a win for black women across the universe but she wasn’t the only victor that night, even if she reigned supreme. 

Swe Zin Htet, Miss Myanmar, is the pageant’s first openly gay contestant. In fact, Htet came out publicly only a week before the pageant’s final round. The competition hasn’t had an out contestant in its 67-year history. In Myanmar, homosexuality is illegal. Not only was Htet making a stance in Miss Universe, but in a country where she could face very real consequences, including an imprisonment sentence of 10 years to life

Htet comes out to help the LGBTQ community back home.

The 21-year-old contestant wants to use her influence to change the laws against homosexuality in Burma, Myanmar. Members of the LGBTQ community in Burma still face all levels of discrimination and ostracization in society.

“I have that platform that, if I say that I’m a lesbian, it will have a big impact on the LGBTQ community back in Burma,” Htet said. “The difficult thing is that in Burma, LGBTQ people are not accepted. They are looked down on by other people and are being discriminated against.” 

Htet came out on November 29 in an interview with a beauty blog called Missosology. When asked if Htet had any personal causes she told the interviewer that she strongly supported same-sex marriage and LGBTQ rights. It was only a matter of moments before she proudly revealed she was a lesbian herself. 

“I came to a full realization about my sexual orientation over a long period of time. I knew I was ‘one of them’ way back in 2015. It is personally quite challenging but I feel that I have a greater voice and the best position to promote this cause. Some pageant fans know about it and they still support me but this is the first time I am able to talk about it in public,” she told Missosology. 

Coming out wasn’t easy, but Htet hopes it will have a positive change.

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Este es mi último posado oficial como @missuniversespain 2018 y es tan especial como el primero que realicé a días de ser coronada en la hermosa ciudad de Tarragona. Ha pasado más de un año y la emoción de ser #España permanece intacta. Ha sido un camino de descubrimientos, aprendizajes y evolución en el que juntos hicimos historia llevando al universo un mensaje que rompió barreras sociales. Hoy quiero agradecerles a cada uno de ustedes por ser incondicionales conmigo, por acompañarme en las risas, en el llanto, en la lucha por los derechos humanos, en la ardua tarea de educar sobre la diversidad del ser humano y en el orgullo de representar la energía, la cultura y la idiosincrasia de mi país. Gracias universo, gracias #España, gracias a ustedes, mis queridos amigos. Siempre suya, Ángela Ponce. _______ This is my last official shoot as @missuniversespain 2018 and it's just as special as the very first one I did just days after being crowned in the beautiful city of Tarragona. It's been over a year and the excitement to represent Spain is just as alive today! It's been a journey in which we've learned and discovered new things. We have evolved together and made history taking a message that broke barriers and has had a social impact. Today I want to thank each of you for your unconditional support to me. You've been there for me through the good times and bad, throughout this fight for human rights and the difficult task of educating about human diversity. I am very proud to represent the energy, culture and values of my country. Thank you, Universe. Thank you, #Spain. Thank you to all you, my dear friends. Always yours, Ángela Ponce. – Fotografía: @ivandumont. – Coordinación: @rogervrgs. – Producción: @tino.constantino. – Maquillaje y peinado: @jcesarmakeup. – Vestido: @douglastapiaoficial. – Pendientes: @gwittles. – Corona: @gwittles. – Locación: Hotel @vpplazaespanadesign – Org Miss Universe Spain: @milamartinez_pageantcoach.

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Htet told People that coming out wasn’t easy. She knew who she was since she was 15 at least, but her parents weren’t immediately as understanding as she had hoped. 

“At first, they were mad. They didn’t accept me. But later, when they found out more about the LGBTQ community, they started to accept me,” she said. 

Because LGBTQ members experience bigotry in her country, when she entered a three-year relationship with the famous Burmese singer Gae Gae, she had to keep it a secret. The contestant received praise from Paula Shugart, president of The Miss Universe Organization. 

“We are honored to give a platform to strong, inspirational women like Miss Universe Myanmar, who are brave enough to share their unique stories with the world,” Shugart said in a statement. “Miss Universe will always champion women to be proud of who they are.”

While Htet is the first out and proud lesbian in the Miss Universe pageant, there have been other open members of the LGBTQ community. Last year, Angela Ponce, who happens to be trans, was crowned Miss Spain. 

Black women reign supreme in the pageant world for the first time ever.

Hip Latina notes that in 2019, for the first time ever, Miss America, Miss Teen USA, Miss USA, and Miss Universe were all black women. The times, they’re changing! Beauty pageants have been known to promote a white European, cis, thin standard of beauty. While these wins are symbolic they do represent that the larger public perception of black women’s beauty is evolving. 

“I grew up in a world where a woman who looks like me—with my kind of skin and my kind of hair—was never considered to be beautiful,” Tunzi said as she was crowned. “I think it is time that stops today. I want children to look at me and see my face, and I want them to see their faces reflected in mine.”

Even Oprah Winfrey spoke out about the historic win.

Oprah Winfrey congratulated Tunzi on Twitter and invited her to speak at the Oprah Winfrey Leadership Academy for Girls. Leadership was on Tunzi’s mind as well when she won

She said, “I think we are the most powerful beings in the world and that we should be given every opportunity and that is what we should be teaching these young girls—to take up space. Nothing is as important as taking up space in society and cementing yourself.”

Vogue Mexico Teamed Up With British Vogue To Show The Beauty Of ‘Muxes’ An Ancestral Gender-Fluid Indigenous Community

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Vogue Mexico Teamed Up With British Vogue To Show The Beauty Of ‘Muxes’ An Ancestral Gender-Fluid Indigenous Community

voguemexico/ Instagram

Sometimes, fashion is more than just a mirror of society. In a few instances, the fashion industry has actually been responsible for reshaping reality rather than just mirroring it. One way it does this is by breaking taboos and introducing marginalized ideas into the mainstream. The current visibility of transgender people is a development that the fashion world has embraced in recent years. Granted, fashion’s focus on the topic is, more often than not, on the “blurring of traditional lines between genders” to explore androgyny, but many designers and brands are currently emphasizing on a ‘gender-neutral’ and non-binary ethos. The editorial side of fashion however, has been a bit slow to embrace representation and support genderqueer people—but this month, Vogue Mexico and Latin-America, in collaboration with British Vogue, are leading the charge, by dedicating their cover story to a small group of people in Juchitán Oaxaca who seek to live outside of binary labels: Los Muxes.

Vogue Mexico and Latin-America has proven to be the most ‘woke’ publication of Conde Nast’s portfolio this year.

instagram @voguemexico

 The magazine has doubled up on its efforts for representation and diversity. Just this year they made history by featuring an indigenous woman, Yalitza Aparicio, on the cover of a magazine for the very first time, ever. A few months later they featured four Afro-Latinas on their cover and opened the floor to discussion about what being Afro-Latina means. Just last month they honored indigenous women of different parts of Latin America for their 20th anniversary issue. And now, the magazine is shining a light on a centuries-old non-binary indigenous community of rural Mexico, and introducing them to the world. 

In recent years, Oaxaca has become somewhat of a trendy destination. 

instagram @oaxtravel

The Zapotec state is a multicultural hub in the south of Mexico known for its delicious climate, rich food and complex history. The people of Oaxaca have fought hard to keep a lot of their centuries-old traditions and beliefs alive, and one of these beliefs —or rather, a group of people— is called “muxes.”

In Juchitán, a small indigenous town in Southern Oaxaca, a community of individuals known as ‘Muxes’, seek to live free of binary labels “male” and “female.”

instagram @johnohono

 The word muxes also spelled muxhes in some instances, comes from the Spanish word for woman “mujer,” and it generally represents people who are assigned male at birth, but identify as non-binary. Muxes have their own gender identity, different from what the West has traditionally dubbed to be female and male. 

The iterations among the Muxe community and their self-identifications vary – some identify as male but are female-expressing, while others identify as female and are more closely associated with Western culture’s understanding of transgender. In their culture, the term “third gender” might be more suitable to define Muxes. 

Muxes are ‘dual’ beings, they don’t believe in being ‘female’ or ‘male’, they simply are.

Instagram @salvadorconpan

“To be muxe is a duality. We carry out the role depending on the circumstances, sometimes I might seem like a man, and others like a woman,” says Pedro Enriquez Godínez Gutiérrez, a person known locally in Juchitán as “La Kika,” in an interview with Vogue Mexico. Apart from being a muxe, he’s the Director of Sexual Diversity of Juchitán Town Hall. 

Muxes have lived in Juchitan since pre-hispanic times, there are a few indigenous legends that explain their origins and give a faith to the antiquity of their existence.

instagram @voguemexico

There are two legends in Juchitán, that recount the origin of Muxes. One says that San Vicente Ferrer, the holy patron of Juchitán, had a pocket with holes in it, from which they fell out of. Another version says that as he walked the earth, San Vicente Ferrer, always carried three bags: one with male seeds, another loaded with female seeds, and a third that contained both seeds, mixed up. This last bag was the one that broke as he walked through Juchitán, and that is why there are so many muxes there. 

The people of Juchitán are a sort of pre-hispanic family. In this town the women are as strong as the men and muxes are as respected as both men and women. Ironically, the system of tolerance and respect that’s existed there for centuries is considered ‘modern’, elsewhere. 

Mixes are a community that not even the 21st century can wrap its head around. 

Instagram @rafa213

“Gubixha bizaani guirá neza guzá ca,” writes Vogue Mexico, is Zapotec for “the sun illuminated all the roads they have walked”, and perhaps that is why they can walk the streets without fear in a predominantly Catholic country that still struggles to offer equal rights for women and that is mostly intolerant of sexual orientations and preferences, Juchitán remains greatly untouched by this hate. Muxes walk the streets with flowers in their hair, they wear light huipiles —a traditional garment worn by indigenous women— and colorful skirts. This indigenous town is a model of how a culture can make space for life outside of the binary. Juchitán is an example to even the most progressive cities of the world. 

Vogue Mexico and Latin America teamed up with British Vogue to celebrate both British and Mexican talent. 

Instagram @voguemexico

The collaboration marked the first time both publications work together on a joint story. The experience allowed both publications to exchange ideas and share their cultures. Vogue Mexico’s cover, featuring Estrella, one of the muxes from Juchitán, was shot by Tim Walker, the iconic British fashion photographer, and the story will be published on both magazines for the month of December. 

Vogue Mexico’s Editor-In-Chief took to Instagram to share the news of the cover story. 

Instagram @karlamartinezdesalas

“It’s finally here!!! We are releasing one of our December covers early as it is a special joint collaboration with @britishvogue – thank you @edward_enninful for featur[ing] the beauty of MEXICO in the pages of British Vogue. No one could have captured the magical realism better than Tim Walker and Kate Phelan. Stay tuned for more!” wrote the Mexican editor Karla Martinez de Salas on her personal Instagram page.

Vogue Mexico’s December issue will be available nation-wide starting December 1st.