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How To Prep For The ‘March For Our Lives’ Event Happening This Weekend

This Saturday, activists across the globe are turning up for the fight against gun violence and taking part in the worldwide March For Our Lives Event. As you gear up and prepare for the rally, it’s important to know what to expect and have at the ready.

From keeping an I.D. on hand to bringing that weird fanny pack here’s a list of things to do and pack before the protest.

1. Find a march location and decide how you will get there.

March For Our Lives
CREDIT: franklinactivists/ Instagram

This is something you won’t want to leave until the last minute. One million people are expected to attend the event taking place in downtown D.C. alone. For anyone taking part in a march that is located in a big city, be prepared to tackle busy and slightly hairy public transportation systems, particularly because so many people will be trying to go to one place. Plan out safe routes that will help you get to and out of the march once its over.

2. Make it count, remember to sign the petition! (And RSVP)

CREDIT: marchforourlivesdallas / Instagram

Make sure your presence at the rally is known on a platform that’s more valuable. Sign the March For Our Lives petition and make sure to also RSVP for the event. Signatures matter and signing the online petition will help push this movement forward. Don’t forget to continue your efforts after the march by voting and ringing up your local representatives.

3. What to wear, what to wear.

CREDIT: marchforourlivesdallas / Instagram

Stay up to date on the weather and be prepped for unexpected showers and snow. Now is definitely not the time to let the weather rain us out. If you suspect that there could be even a slight drizzle pack a light poncho or raincoat.

4. Pick reliable shoes

CREDIT: amnestyusa / Instagram

Remember, you’re going on a march. Get your feet into a pair of reliable comfy shoes that you can walk in for hours. Don’t forget to wear cozy socks!

5. Wear the right bag

CREDIT: jewishwomenintl / Instagram

 You’ll need a place to AT LEAST keep your I.D., some cash and your cell phone. (If you’re packing rain gear, snacks, and water you’ll also want to have a bag that has space for that.) There’s no better time to wear that fanny pack you’ve been feeling iffy about than now. Or, go for a cross-body bag. Avoid big bulky purses that your mom won’t be around to carry for you, or could get you into trouble with security*.

6. Things to pack.

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Make sure you keep yourself comfy and energetic by packing items that are totally essential! 

7. Bring snacks

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Marches go on for hours. If this is your first time marching make sure you have everything you’ll need to be comfortable and energized. Energy snacks like granola and protein bars are great to bring along, but also be sure to pack water.

8. Pack water.

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You’re going to be walking for a while so it’s important to stay hydrated!

9. Wear your poncho

CREDIT: mossdorothy / Instagram

Even if you don’t have a poster to bring, your hands will be occupied. Opt for a poncho or coat (bonus points if they have pockets!) instead of an umbrella so you can keep your hands free.

10. Get a portable phone charger.

CREDIT: hotlistla / Instagram

 Make sure you have a portable phone charger on hand in case of any emergencies.

11. Bring some signs.

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It’s possible that people will be handing out signs for you to carry at the march, but if you really want to make a statement, make your own!

12. And a teeny first-aid-kit.

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f you wear the right shoes, you probably won’t have to worry too much about blisters. But you can never be too prepared when it comes to Band-Aids.

13. Don’t forget your medication.

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If you need any medication, be sure to bring it with you. You will be allowed to bring medicine through checkpoints, but you can avoid any problems by making sure to keep your medication in their prescription packages and bottles.

14. Bring a bandana just in case.

CREDIT: shamellbell / Instagram

We’re hoping to have a peaceful protest this weekend, but just in case things get out of hand, be prepared for worse case scenarios which could include tear gas.

*There probably won’t be tear gas or mace sprayed at the event but canisters will likely be present because of security. In a scenario where tear gas is sprayed, be sure to protect your eyes and lungs. Poor water onto your bandana and hold over your nose and mouth as you leave. Don’t attempt to rinse your eyes out with water, seek medical assistance for this first. Because most of the marches have been approved by the city there will likely be medical personnel at the event you attend. If you suspect tear gas could be sprayed at your event, consider wearing glasses instead of contacts.

15. Pack your identification.

CREDIT: shamellbell / Instagram

Having your I.D. on hand is important for everyone, but for trans marchers, it is doubly important that you have identification that matches your gender identity should you run into any emergencies.

16.Stay safe.

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You’ll always want to bring safety to your march, you never know what could happen.

17. Bring a buddy.

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When you go to a big event like this you should never go alone. Stay safe and make sure you have at least one friend who can keep an out for you and vice versa. The buddy system is crucial here.

18. Have a plan

CREDIT: mermaid_katy / Instagram

Hopefully, you won’t get separated from a friend, but there’s a slight chance that you will. Have a plan of where and what time to meet your friends if you do get separated and someone’s phone dies (bring that charger!)

19. Stay away from counter-protesters.

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Anyone who shows up to the march this weekend to counter-protest is looking for a confrontation. Don’t engage with anyone who yells at you or attempts to get violent.

20. Know where your exit points are.

CREDIT: marina.parodi / Instagram

Again all should run smoothly over the weekend, but should anything negative go down be sure to have an exit strategy. Once you arrive at the march have an idea of where your best exit points are around you to get away if anything happens.

21. Bring your voice.

CREDIT: shamellbell / Instagram

Unless you’re a march organizer you can probably leave your megaphone at home, but definitely bring your voice!

22. Send us your pics!

CREDIT: @50milesmore / isntagram

Don’t forget to share your pics and videos from the march with FIERCE. Send us your photos with the hashtag #FIERCEESMarch and post your images in our comments section on FB!


Read: Survivor Of Florida School Shooting Emma Gonzalez Is Turning Her Anger Into Political Activism

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UPS Delivery Man Is Fired After Video Surfaces of His Anti-Latino Racist Rant

Things That Matter

UPS Delivery Man Is Fired After Video Surfaces of His Anti-Latino Racist Rant

Photo courtesy Forward Latino

An unnamed UPS delivery driver has been fired after being caught using racist language when delivering a package to a Latino household. The incident occurred on December 17th.

The video, which was caught on a doorbell camera’s security footage, shows a white UPS driver appearing to be angry when delivering a package.

“Now you don’t get f—–g nothing…You can’t read and write and speak the f—–g English language,” he says while writing a “failed to deliver” notice and pasting it on the house’s front door.

The Aviles family says that the footage shows that the UPS worker never even attempted to deliver the package in the first place. He never rang the doorbell or knocked on the door. Based on that, the family has come to the conclusion that the driver intentionally withheld the package from the family out of prejudice and spite

They believe that the only way the driver could’ve known that the family was Latino was by making assumptions based off the name on the package.

“The only information this driver had that could serve as a trigger for this deep-seated hate was the name on the package,” said Forward Latino President Darryl Morin at a press conference addressing the incident.

“So what we have here is a very intentional act to ruin Christmas for somebody, for someone to spew this hateful rhetoric, and quite honestly to deceive their employer,” Morin continued.

Per UPS, the employee has now been fired. “There is no place in any community for racism, bigotry or hate. This is very serious and we promptly took action, terminating the driver’s employment. UPS is wholeheartedly committed to diversity, equity and inclusion,” UPS said in a statement. They also said they contacted the family to apologize.

But the Aviles family is still rattled that such bigoted people are out and about, letting their petty prejudices effect other people’s lives.

“The package was a Christmas gift that we eventually received after Christmas Day, but what if it happened to have time-sensitive content like an epipen or a book I needed to take a final,” said Shirley Aviles, the mother of the man who lives at the address, told NBC News. “I don’t get it. It’s just sad.”

Aviles seemed disturbed about what this incident says about human nature. “This is about the things people do when they think no one is watching them. That’s important because that’s when you see people’s true colors and that’s what’s scary,”

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Here Are Some Christmas Traditions From Around Latin America

Culture

Here Are Some Christmas Traditions From Around Latin America

Henry Sadura / Getty Images

Christmas is a special time of year. Families have their traditions to mark the festive year and some of those traditions are rooted in culture. Here are some of the ways various countries in Latin America celebrate Christmas.

El Pase Del Niño Viajero – Ecuador

El Pase del Niño Viajero is a pageant that happens in Ecuador that lasts weeks. The parade is meant to represent the journey of Mary and Joseph. The parade highlights the religious importance of Christmas in Ecuador and is most common in the Andean region of the country.

The biggest and most important parade is in Cuenca, a deeply religious city. Citizens near the city have all day to see the parade as it starts in the early morning and runs through the late afternoon. This gives people a lot of time to make it to the city to witness the parade.

La Gritería – Nicaragua

La Gritería comes after La Purisma. La Purisma is celebrated at the end of November and is meant to celebrate the Immaculate Conception of the Virgin Mary. La Gritería is celebrated in early December and involves literal yelling. Someone would shout “Que causa tanta alegria?” (“What causes so much happiness?”) People respond “La Concepción de María.” (“Mary’s Conception.”)

Las Posadas – Mexico

Mexican posadas are the most recognizable. Posadas take place in Mexico from Dec. 16-24, though this year they are most likely to be virtual. The posada begins with a procession in the neighborhood filled with people singing and sometimes led by two people dressed as Mary and Joseph.

Another part is the posada party. Before guests can enter, there is a song exchange with the people outside playing Joseph looking for shelter. The hosts sing the side of the innkeeper saying there is no room. Eventually, the guests are welcomed into the home to celebrate Christmas.

Aguinaldos – Colombia

Aguinaldos are a series of games played by people in Colombia leading up to Christmas. There are certain games that are common among people in Colombia. One is pajita en boca, which requires holding a straw in your mouth the entire time of a social event. Another is dar y no recibir, which is about getting people to take something you are giving to score a point.

El Quema Del Diablo – Guatemala

El quema del diablo is celebrated in early December and is a way of letting go of the previous year. People burn piñatas and effigies of the devil to let go of all negative feelings and moments from the previous year. If there was every to try a new tradition, this would be the year. Burn an effigy and banish 2020 to the past, where it belongs.

READ: These Seriously Sad Christmas Presents Were Worse Than Actual Coal

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